What badges/flashes do I wear? (ex Royal Marine joins Army)

A dagger is purely for stabbing

In fairness, so's the fighting knife.

IIRC all the drawings showing use of the knife in F/S's book 'Get Tough' show the point being used - even the slashes use the point.

But I agree - It's deemed a knife. For those unaware, initially they were ground down from out of service bayonets.
 
It ain't a dagger, It's a knife. Sykes/Fairburn.


I may have spelt that incorrectly.
Which as a double edged knife designed principally for thrusting, makes it a dagger.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
As an old brigade bod if I'm at funerals etc for vets I wear a beret, I have the RE cap badge (of course) but I decided to put a pin of the AVRE above it . Just to let people know that the Sapper God is Armoured, if you see me about don't abuse me just remember that I am a fan of liquorish allsorts .
 
In fairness, so's the fighting knife.

IIRC all the drawings showing use of the knife in F/S's book 'Get Tough' show the point being used - even the slashes use the point.

But I agree - It's deemed a knife. For those unaware, initially they were ground down from out of service bayonets.
Very true regarding the FS, I was referring to the difference between knives and daggers generally.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Very true regarding the FS, I was referring to the difference between knives and daggers generally.
And I was referring to Jinxy's personal definition.

I would agree with your definition of a dagger and go on to say all daggers are knives, but not all knives are daggers.
There again Jinxy may have an entirely different view on matters.
 

jinxy

LE
And I was referring to Jinxy's personal definition.

I would agree with your definition of a dagger and go on to say all daggers are knives, but not all knives are daggers.
There again Jinxy may have an entirely different view on matters.
I suppose I define dagger, as a knife that is held in a closed fist, with the blade pointing away from the little finger, as opposed to the blade pointing away from the thumb. The former would seem to me to be limited in its use, whereas the latter seems to me to be more flexible.

I think the S F knife was designed to be a tool, so as well as slitting throats, stabbing spinal cords, you could probably open a can of beans with it.
 
A knife has a primary edged blade.
A dagger has edges on both sides going a single point.
Some historical daggers had triangular blades. Some medieval rondel type and Second World War sneaky beaky examples in particular.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
I suppose I define dagger, as a knife that is held in a closed fist, with the blade pointing away from the little finger, as opposed to the blade pointing away from the thumb. The former would seem to me to be limited in its use, whereas the latter seems to me to be more flexible.
It seems odd to define a knife by the way one picks it up.
In fact by that very definition any short bladed tool would sometimes be a dagger and sometimes a knife.

I still believe a dagger is double edged knife designed for thrusting attacks.

I think the S F knife was designed to be a tool, so as well as slitting throats, stabbing spinal cords, you could probably open a can of beans with it.
The Fairbairn-Sykes is very good as a stabbing tool and utterly pants at everything else.
See "All-In Fighting" for drawings of use - all use the point.

As for opening a can of beans, that's a quick and efficient method of shortening the blade.
If you see original wartime, or even later, blades, many have been reground due to their owners using them for anything other than killing an enemy.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Some historical daggers had triangular blades.
I've been shown triangular seventeenth century artillery daggers where lines and numbers were engraved on the flats providing a ready reckoner to work out charge and elevation for a particular range.

Some medieval rondel type and Second World War sneaky beaky examples in particular.
Sleeve dagger ?
 
I've been shown triangular seventeenth century artillery daggers where lines and numbers were engraved on the flats providing a ready reckoner to work out charge and elevation for a particular range.


Sleeve dagger ?
I'd forgotten the artillery ones, some also had another scale for measuring how much powder was in a container.

Sleeve dagger and some versions of the nail dagger/bodkin.
 

Truxx

LE
I have served in lots of units with RM retreads.

I have yet to see any wearing mudflaps, just the dettol badge.

Some units encourage the retention of the green beret, others not.

Like all things less is more, or put it another way be who you are now not who you were then.
 

Alamo

LE
Hello all,

I was a fully trained Royal Marines Commando for a few years. After several years as a Civvy I have joined my local army reserves unit. While on Mod 1 I was advised by the DL that I should wear the commando dagger and be proud of my previous achievements in the forces (which I am). However, I have also been advised by another source to where the army commando flashes which, I am not sure is correct cos I didn't do the AACC.

There are several threads about this on here but I am yet to see a definitive answer, any help will be gratefully received.

Cheers,
Steve.
Why not do something completely radical, like ask an authoritative source, rather than a bunch of unknowns on a website?
 
Hello all,

I was a fully trained Royal Marines Commando for a few years. After several years as a Civvy I have joined my local army reserves unit. While on Mod 1 I was advised by the DL that I should wear the commando dagger and be proud of my previous achievements in the forces (which I am). However, I have also been advised by another source to where the army commando flashes which, I am not sure is correct cos I didn't do the AACC.

There are several threads about this on here but I am yet to see a definitive answer, any help will be gratefully received.

Cheers,
Steve.
Never mind all that. Can you stamp your feet?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

Latest Threads

Top