What are you reading right now?

Andy Bear

Clanker
I have just start reading Flashman and will be working my way through the books in chronological order. I enjoy historical fiction (blessed be the Cornwell) and like to research the historical truths of the events that happen in the stories. I am always in awe of how good authors and story tellers can weave a compelling story from the dry bones of history, with a little bit of artistic licence.
 
I have just start reading Flashman and will be working my way through the books in chronological order. I enjoy historical fiction (blessed be the Cornwell) and like to research the historical truths of the events that happen in the stories. I am always in awe of how good authors and story tellers can weave a compelling story from the dry bones of history, with a little bit of artistic licence.
Read them as they were written, not in chronological order.
You'll enjoy them more.
 
The Complete MacAuslan is a favourite.

I have somewhere in the house a hard copy of the book but also the Kindle version ... also amongst my favourites ... if you want to have a laugh try using the " Text to Speech " option on Kindle .... especially in passages which feature MacAuslan .
 
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I have somewhere in the house a hard copy of the book but also the Kindle version ... also amongst my favourites ... if you want to have a laugh try using the " Test to Speech " option on Kindle .... especially in passages which feature MacAuslan .
Flashman - yes
MacAuslan - yes.
Mr American - yes
Hollywood history - yes
Quartered safe - yes
Light on at Signpost - yes.
But Pyrates, Black Ajax, Reavers, Captain in Calico? Nope - tried hard, but never finished any of em.
 
Thanks for the advice. Why would they be more enjoyable in order written? Anything to do with evolution of writing style or character development. Genuine question.
Because GMF referred to incidents which happened, but which he hadn't written about yet.
So you will get a few spoilers.
Writing style as well, as you noted.
Also, Flashy makes a few appearances in Mr American, being his caddish self.
 

Lacking Moral Fibre

War Hero
Book Reviewer

This is a great book, I've read plenty about the Normandy campaign but to follow this Sherman equipped Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry Regiment as it struggles off Sword beach and fights it's way into Germany is fascinating. The book has many detailed maps and photographs including aerial pictures taken on D Day showing the AFV's moving off inland as well as diagrams of the Sherman.
I was very surprised how many tanks were bogged down or knocked out and yet were recovered and repaired and back in action the following day and throughout the rest of the war.
Also how often the rapid firing 75mm main gun could and did knock out Tigers and Panthers. The tactic was to rapid fire the main gun at every opportunity. On one day in June a crew knocked out 4 IIRC. Max Hastings Normandy book reckons you had no chance of knocking out these tanks.
He also explains that tanks didn't usually brew up immediately unless it was fully loaded with shells and fuel and that most crew casualties occurred outside the tank.
The reader get's to know the names of many of the officers and other ranks, many were brave tough leaders all mainly in their 20's.
The padre was an exceptional man, he took it upon himself to find and bury and record, often on his own, every dead soldier, often crawling out in front of the enemy to look for the missing.
Later on in Holland the Regiment is supporting American glider troops, several Sherman's are sent to a position to find the American troops casually walking and relaxing in view of the Germans who are doing the same. The Lt Troop leader asks the American Senior why he's not attacking, the American officer replies that 'they aren't shooting so why should we?'
Oh really replies the troop officer 'watch this' and sends his 3 Sherman's charging at the Germans knocking out a SP gun and scattering the survivors. After 5 years of war these young men were becoming hardened to it.
If you get the audio book version Al Murray narrates it.
 


The padre was an exceptional man, he took it upon himself to find and bury and record, often on his own, every dead soldier, often crawling out in front of the enemy to look for the missing.
Was that the padre who also took it on himself to bury German dead and on one occasion as he finished burying some German dead turned around to see a Panzer with the crew saluting him? I recall something along those lines in a thread on this site.
 

Lacking Moral Fibre

War Hero
Book Reviewer
Was that the padre who also took it on himself to bury German dead and on one occasion as he finished burying some German dead turned around to see a Panzer with the crew saluting him? I recall something along those lines in a thread on this site.
I don't think so, I will check though.
 

Boxer96

Old-Salt
This sounds like a good read:
Soldiers: Great Stories of War and Peace, edited by Max Hastings, William Collins, 517pp; £25
Reviewed in today's Times - here's a taster
Robert Graves tells of two Scottish privates in the Great War who decide to murder a tyrannical sergeant. After bungling the killing, they seek out their adjutant. “We’ve come to report, sir, that we are very sorry but we’ve shot our company sergeant-major.” “Good heavens,” the adjutant replies, “how did that happen?” “It was an accident, sir.” “What do you mean? Did you mistake him for a German?” “No, sir, we mistook him for our platoon sergeant.”
 
Flashman - yes
MacAuslan - yes.
Mr American - yes
Hollywood history - yes
Quartered safe - yes
Light on at Signpost - yes.
But Pyrates, Black Ajax, Reavers, Captain in Calico? Nope - tried hard, but never finished any of em.

BBC radio Scotland serialised it with GMF narrating, a good book worth keeping alongside

 
BBC radio Scotland serialised it with GMF narrating, a good book worth keeping alongside

I must find a copy of the audio.
GMF gets quite vexxed in his writing, hearing him say it would be amazing.
Thanks for that.
 
Flashman - yes
MacAuslan - yes.
Mr American - yes
Hollywood history - yes
Quartered safe - yes
Light on at Signpost - yes.
But Pyrates, Black Ajax, Reavers, Captain in Calico? Nope - tried hard, but never finished any of em.
Totally agree with your reaction, I have struggled with the same ones as you. You didn't mention The Steel Bonnets, a good factual read.
 

This is a great book, I've read plenty about the Normandy campaign but to follow this Sherman equipped Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry Regiment as it struggles off Sword beach and fights it's way into Germany is fascinating. The book has many detailed maps and photographs including aerial pictures taken on D Day showing the AFV's moving off inland as well as diagrams of the Sherman.
I was very surprised how many tanks were bogged down or knocked out and yet were recovered and repaired and back in action the following day and throughout the rest of the war.
Also how often the rapid firing 75mm main gun could and did knock out Tigers and Panthers. The tactic was to rapid fire the main gun at every opportunity. On one day in June a crew knocked out 4 IIRC. Max Hastings Normandy book reckons you had no chance of knocking out these tanks.
He also explains that tanks didn't usually brew up immediately unless it was fully loaded with shells and fuel and that most crew casualties occurred outside the tank.
The reader get's to know the names of many of the officers and other ranks, many were brave tough leaders all mainly in their 20's.
The padre was an exceptional man, he took it upon himself to find and bury and record, often on his own, every dead soldier, often crawling out in front of the enemy to look for the missing.
Later on in Holland the Regiment is supporting American glider troops, several Sherman's are sent to a position to find the American troops casually walking and relaxing in view of the Germans who are doing the same. The Lt Troop leader asks the American Senior why he's not attacking, the American officer replies that 'they aren't shooting so why should we?'
Oh really replies the troop officer 'watch this' and sends his 3 Sherman's charging at the Germans knocking out a SP gun and scattering the survivors. After 5 years of war these young men were becoming hardened to it.
If you get the audio book version Al Murray narrates it.
Thanks for this, it's just become my Christmas treat!

Because I have a tight family background (financially speaking), I just glanced at the price on Amazon UK for the book, and it comes in at 50% cheaper.. Only mentioning it in case anyone else wants to grab a bit of a bargain (hardback)..
 
Just re-reading Evelyn Waugh’s Scoop about journalists in a fictional African country to cover a civil war. Very funny and well written.
However in the spirit of Durham University students dummy-spitting at Rod Liddle’s recent invitation to speak at one of their dinners, it was written in 1938 so contains views and terms that may offend.
 
Just re-reading Evelyn Waugh’s Scoop about journalists in a fictional African country to cover a civil war. Very funny and well written.
However in the spirit of Durham University students dummy-spitting at Rod Liddle’s recent invitation to speak at one of their dinners, it was written in 1938 so contains views and terms that may offend.
“Up to a point, Lord Copper”
Terrific stuff. I’m no Tory, and enjoy the skewering Waugh takes part in.
I‘m a firm advocate of just reading/watching stuff without filtration.
Left/fight, lampoon them all.
And enjoy them all; I have a feeling that Waugh, and Kingsley Amis will be gradually erased before long.
 
download (1).jpeg

I've just finished this and I have no idea what it was about, awful from one of my favourite authors.
 

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