What are you reading right now?

Thanks for the link.

I don't 'do' ebooks. Nothing against them but just not for me. However, the picture on that site of the library room is very nice.

I was even thinking of starting a 'Show us your Library' thread similar to the 'Show us your Kitchen' one but knowing my form it will probably crash and burn!

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Compared to a hardback, I find an ebook is a lot lighter when it hits me in the face as I fall asleep at night.
 

Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou


This is the story of Elizabeth Holmes. A woman currently in court.

I'm finding the story and the book a cracker.

Elizabeth Holmes was a woman with a hell of an idea and a Steve Jobs fixation. She couldn't deliver on the idea but carried on anyway and duped investors.

She had the idea for a machine that could do multiple blood tests with just a drop of blood. This would revolutionise the planet.

Imagine popping into a pharmacy, or supermarket giving the machine a few drops of blood and it telling you if you were a diabetic, had cancer, syphilis, HIV, hepatitis etc.

The result being sent to you while you were shopping etc. No doctors, labs, clinics, hospitals. Would be carried in a casevac helicopter, used in the Third World etc.

The market was huge and would change the world.

Just one problem.

It didn't work.

The impression is it would be like me having the idea for a space ship that would fit in your garage and then having team meetings on whether it should be like a flying saucer or a rocket ship while not getting the thing actually working.

But this didn't stop Elizabeth. If it doesn't work, fake it for the investors and sue anyone who talks while dressing like Steve Jobs and speaking in a low voice while staring and not blinking.

Once the story did get out that it didn't work then the multi-billion pound valuation of her company crashed to zero.

She is now potentially looking at decades inside. Her case was delayed by covid and getting pregnant.


 
There is the additional risk of electrocution if you fall asleep in the bath though. I take it you like living life dangerously.
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The author of this compelling memoir proved himself one of the most successful small ship commanders during the Norwegian campaign in 1940, and then served at sea continuously throughout the rest of the War.In Norway, as second-in-command of a Black Swan sloop, he experienced the suspense and nervous strain of operating in the narrow waters of a twisting fjord under heavy air attack, but his humour was never far away. 'I don't want to appear fussy, but are we going to be greeted by cheers and kisses from Norwegian blondes, or a hail of gunfire from invisible Huns?' he remarked to his officers on approaching the small town of Andalsnes. His next task - in command first of a corvette and then a destroyer - was escorting East Coast convoys, and his experiences reflect the danger of this work against the menaces of E-boats, enemy aircraft and mines. He then took part in the landings at Anzio and the Normandy landings in 1944; finally, he rescued internees from the Japanese prison camp on Stanley, Hong Kong. His career was much helped by his highly developed sixth sense for danger, the deep affection of his crews and his affinity with cats which he believed brought him luck. This record of varied and almost incessant action ranks among the most thrilling personal stories of the war at sea.
Excellent.
 
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The author of this compelling memoir proved himself one of the most successful small ship commanders during the Norwegian campaign in 1940, and then served at sea continuously throughout the rest of the War.In Norway, as second-in-command of a Black Swan sloop, he experienced the suspense and nervous strain of operating in the narrow waters of a twisting fjord under heavy air attack, but his humour was never far away. 'I don't want to appear fussy, but are we going to be greeted by cheers and kisses from Norwegian blondes, or a hail of gunfire from invisible Huns?' he remarked to his officers on approaching the small town of Andalsnes. His next task - in command first of a corvette and then a destroyer - was escorting East Coast convoys, and his experiences reflect the danger of this work against the menaces of E-boats, enemy aircraft and mines. He then took part in the landings at Anzio and the Normandy landings in 1944; finally, he rescued internees from the Japanese prison camp on Stanley, Hong Kong. His career was much helped by his highly developed sixth sense for danger, the deep affection of his crews and his affinity with cats which he believed brought him luck. This record of varied and almost incessant action ranks among the most thrilling personal stories of the war at sea.
Excellent.

Thought this might be interesting and while the kindle price is rational, a paperback edition (albeit a reprint) is $641. I had an attack of the vapours at that!
 
I recently bought “A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush” by Eric Newby in a charity shop.
Browsing in the library a day or two later, I borrowed a book of his collected writings “A Merry Dance Around the World”.
Read the latter before Hampshire Libraries Gestapo apply the overdue thumbscrews (You can spot ‘em mile off. They wear a ’LAH’ cuffband: Library Assistants Hampshire)*
Newby’s WW2 POW exploits in Italy are worth the price of admission alone. Warry bits glossed over, his admiration for the Italians who repeatedly went out of their way shines through.
Great read.
* Any resemblance to Hampshire Library Services and the Liebstandarte Adolf Hitler is fleeting, and only in my fevered imagination. One is ruthlessly efficient and organised and one allows tramps and drunks to ride its coat-tails.
 
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Ashamed to say it took me this long (I like to consider myself a bit of a historical novel buff) but finally getting round to reading Robert Harris' Cicero trilogy. Annoyingly it's in the first person 'lost history' narrative of his secretaty (a la Count Belisarius) but fortunately doesn't attempt to have a deliberately antique, clunky style like Robert Graves does. Enjoying it so far.
 
First, two admissions: I am not reading this book now, but I will as soon as I can source it. Secondly, I know that some Arrsers regard Flashman books not written by GMF (PBUH) as sacrilege. I'm not one of those, but I do recognise GMF's books as the apogee of Flashman books.

Here it is:

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Synopsis, courtesy of Henlow Publishing Ltd:
On 1st October our best selling author, Robert Brightwell, will be publishing his eleventh novel featuring the adventures of Thomas Flashman (Harry's Napoleonic era uncle.) Book details below:
'Flashman's Winter' fills in two gaps in Flashman’s career, hitherto uncovered by his memoirs. The bulk of this volume is taken up with Flashman’s adventures in what was then Prussia, but which now comprises Poland, Russia and the Baltic states. In 1806 Prussia declared war on France and in a disastrous campaign lost most of its territory. Russia was forced to come to its aid and Britain too sent observers to assess how to help. Flashman joins this mission in what should have been a safe diplomatic visit – but of course was anything but.
From bloody, frozen retreats to battles in blizzards, he is soon in the thick of the action as a country fights for its very survival. Diplomatic intrigues follow and, with the aid of a Russian countess, our hero uncovers the enemy’s plans – and works to frustrate them.
Also included is the short story 'Flashman’s Christmas', set in Paris a few months after the battle of Waterloo. As royalists conduct vindictive purges on former Bonapartists, Flashman is embroiled in a notorious eve of execution jailbreak as he is reunited with old friends to outwit old enemies.
 

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