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What are you reading right now?

I am reading and enjoying 'A Raid Over Berlin' by John Martin. Thoroughly recommend. I won't go into more details as it deserves not to be spoiled but anyone with an interest in aircrew history and Bomber Command will find the autobiographical account very interesting.
 

Poppy

LE
I got my copy from a charity shop too!

I would say 90% of all my books are second hand and I assume that is quite the norm in the round.
50p bargain :)
 
71dMHLhcHzL.jpg

The second and last book by Damien 'Hyperbole' Lewis I will ever read, ******* gash.
 

Sexton Blake

War Hero
View attachment 514403
The second and last book by Damien 'Hyperbole' Lewis I will ever read, ******* gash.
Couldn't agree more.

I gave up reading his 'Op Certain Death' book after about 10 pages. And for me (and probably most of you here) giving up reading a book once started is an absolute sin.

The only other one (not by Damien 'made up squaddie vocabulary' Lewis) that I had to sack after about 5 attempts was the ubiquitous Ulysses by James Joyce.
 
John Stieber was a twelve-year-old schoolboy in Ireland when he was sent to secondary school in Germany. Caught there by the outbreak of the Second World War, he was unable to return to his parents for seven years.In due course, he was called to serve in an anti-aircraft battery and in the National Labour Service. Just after his eighteenth birthday, he was sent to the Russian Front with the elite Paratrooper and Tank Division, Hermann G?ring. He lived through an amazing series of events, escaping death many times and was one of the few survivors of his division when the war ended.In this narrative of his early life, John Stieber describes how he went from a carefree childhood through increasing hardships, until every day of his life became a challenge for survival.
 
The only other one (not by Damien 'made up squaddie vocabulary' Lewis) that I had to sack after about 5 attempts was the ubiquitous Ulysses by James Joyce.

I do agree. Mercifully, I was headed off at the pass by having - "Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man' to wade through. I was even considering the moniker Stephen_ D when I first joined this website.
 
I got my copy from a charity shop too!

I would say 90% of all my books are second hand and I assume that is quite the norm in the round.
@Poppy

... and on that subject I too have bought some excellent books from such shops ... I have posted before I hold Ernest Shackleton in high esteem as a man with superb leadership qualities . I have many books about him . When his ship the Endurance became trapped in the ice in 1915 he and his men were forced to man haul boats across the ice to reach the open sea as the first part of their epic journey to safety . He issued an order that each man was only allowed to carry ( IIRC ) 2 lb in weight of personal items . To demonstrate quite clearly that he would lead by example he threw away his Gold Watch and as Captain took only one page from the Ship's Bible . There followed a long debate between Shackleton and Frank Hurley , the Official Photographer , concerning what to do with all the photographs which had been taken . Shackleton finally agreed that Hurley could pick a specified number of photographic glass plates which would be a record of their achievements in the event of their deaths .

Below is a " Coffee Table Book " which contains most of those photographs ... I picked it up for £10 in a shop in Wooler ... I do not think it had ever been opened ...


Shackleton Pics WL.jpg



ETA .... a new copy costs ~£110 .
 
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Ritch

LE
Having seen the miniseries "Band of Brothers" several times, I've never actually read the book by Stephen Ambrose until now.

The main thing I've discovered with the book is that it seems to have a very poor opinion of British troops and their tactics in battle. Every mention of British troops is usually followed by the author stating that the 101st Airborne thought we were a bunch of muppets.
 
I gave up reading his 'Op Certain Death' book after about 10 pages. And for me (and probably most of you here) giving up reading a book once started is an absolute sin.
I think it was serialised in the Mail. In it as the Chinooks are coming in to land he alledges that the D Sqn Troopers in the back were banging their heads against the side of the helicopter shouting out "we are going to do it", "we are going to do it". If that had been in the 'Victor' comic for boys in the sixties I would have found it unbelievable.

I had a look at 'Bloody Heroes' in the library and I couldn't help groaning out aloud, it was that bad. The pictures in it were obviously staged, but he thinks he can get away with it by sticking a bit of black nasty ovder their eyes. At best his books can be described as 'faction' i.e there was a rescue operation by the SAS and A Coy 1 Para to rescue RIR soldiers held hostage by the West Side Boys and that the closest you will get to the fact side of faction.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I’ve been reading a lot and watching a lot of videos on wood turning lately.
I’ve got myself a lathe
B0F4761D-1C80-4F4C-90BA-6165BF764D5D.jpeg
and all the bits and bobs and in the process spent a bloody fortune but a man needs a hobby in retirement.
The wife was perusing a charity shop a few weeks back and got this for a £1.00
I’ll be very honest and say these designs are far beyond my capabilities at the moment but it’s something to inspire too. Forty different projects are contained within the book.
Contains 20 colour photos and detailed drawings of how the projects were made, it was printed as a result of a wood working magazine competition back in 1987 so as you can guess the standard of detail is pretty high @Legs might find this beneficial, but then again Legs probably won the competition and had a hand in selecting the entries.
 
Having seen the miniseries "Band of Brothers" several times, I've never actually read the book by Stephen Ambrose until now.

The main thing I've discovered with the book is that it seems to have a very poor opinion of British troops and their tactics in battle. Every mention of British troops is usually followed by the author stating that the 101st Airborne thought we were a bunch of muppets.
There are a number of differences between the book and the series also, and the book explains the sudden disappearances of some of the characters. Even though I enjoyed the series, the impression was that Easy Company pretty much won the war on their own. In The World At War, Ambrose states that the British only contributed 25% of the Allied forces in quite a sneering tone.
 

Ritch

LE
There are a number of differences between the book and the series also, and the book explains the sudden disappearances of some of the characters. Even though I enjoyed the series, the impression was that Easy Company pretty much won the war on their own. In The World At War, Ambrose states that the British only contributed 25% of the Allied forces in quite a sneering tone.

To be honest, I got that feeling from the book as well - that Easy were single-handedly handing the Germans their backsides.

There's another.book on sale called "The Real Band of Brothers" and I may try that to see if it's any better. I have gone right off Stephen Ambrose.
 
Having seen the miniseries "Band of Brothers" several times, I've never actually read the book by Stephen Ambrose until now.

The main thing I've discovered with the book is that it seems to have a very poor opinion of British troops and their tactics in battle. Every mention of British troops is usually followed by the author stating that the 101st Airborne thought we were a bunch of muppets.
There are a number of differences between the book and the series also, and the book explains the sudden disappearances of some of the characters. Even though I enjoyed the series, the impression was that Easy Company pretty much won the war on their own. In The World At War, Ambrose states that the British only contributed 25% of the Allied forces in quite a sneering tone.
To be honest, I got that feeling from the book as well - that Easy were single-handedly handing the Germans their backsides.

There's another.book on sale called "The Real Band of Brothers" and I may try that to see if it's any better. I have gone right off Stephen Ambrose.
Ambrose fails to hide his antipathy for anything British in any of his writing. He's been roundly criticised and pulled up for it, and the efficacy of his comments, many, many times by 'real' historians.
 

Ritch

LE
Ambrose fails to hide his antipathy for anything British in any of his writing. He's been roundly criticised and pulled up for it, and the efficacy of his comments, many, many times by 'real' historians.

I'm glad to hear that. He comes across as a sulking child at times.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
I’ve been reading a lot and watching a lot of videos on wood turning lately.
I’ve got myself a latheView attachment 514846 and all the bits and bobs and in the process spent a bloody fortune but a man needs a hobby in retirement.
The wife was perusing a charity shop a few weeks back and got this for a £1.00
I’ll be very honest and say these designs are far beyond my capabilities at the moment but it’s something to inspire too. Forty different projects are contained within the book.
Contains 20 colour photos and detailed drawings of how the projects were made, it was printed as a result of a wood working magazine competition back in 1987 so as you can guess the standard of detail is pretty high @Legs might find this beneficial, but then again Legs probably won the competition and had a hand in selecting the entries.
Cheeky sod. I only turned 17 that year.
 

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