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What are you reading right now?

You had better order the next in the series now then, very amusing and convincing.

Thanks for that - I'm a few chapters in and just getting over that adjustment phase I notice when I go from one author to another. But I'm enjoying it and will seek out (and download) the next volume.
 
This one is one of my 'comfort collection'. Comfort Collection being the book(s) I read exclusively on the throne (never a book reading opportunity should be wasted).

Covers all theatres of WW2, which once again (as if I/we ever need it) reminding me of the bravery and stoicism of the men of WW2. Yes, and the RAF too!

Absolutely packed with vignette after vignette (not all with a happy ending) supplemented with some rare photo's. Brilliantly written and researched. Try it, even if this is not your normal Military area of reading.

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Thanks again for your Post … a fascinating read on a subject about which I had little knowledge . We were really poorly prepared to recover Aircrew that came down in the sea at the beginning of WW2 … needs must ensured the rapid development of kit , rescue services and training . Perish the thought of spending a few days in the North Sea / English Channel in an open Life Raft … some did indeed perish this way .

Intriguing to see how recovery developed and the measures taken to successfully rescue crews and troops from downed Aircraft and Gliders during Operations D Day and Market Garden .

On a personal note when I was about 10 I acquired a One Man Dinghy which gave myself and friends a new “ toy “ for use off Tynemouth Beach … great fun even after someone tore the floor … we simply cut it out and had a “ Four Kid “ Life Belt to surf into the beach .

I too would strongly recommend " Shot Down And In The Drink " as a read .
 
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Just finished "The Volunteer - The True Story of the resistance hero who infiltrated Auschwitz" by Jack Fairweather. Phenomenal book about a seriously brave man.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
I don’t do SF as a rule, the Dames a huge fan and I always said I would know when it was coming to the last days when I started reading Thomas Covenant.

But there’s this guy called Marko Kloos who does a fine line in space war stories, The first one was Terms of Enlistment and on from there,
Very readable.
 
I've been listening to Audiobooks A little Hatred and The trouble with Peace by Joe Abercrombie and read by Steven Pacey. Both books are excellent. It's a fantasy world but really mirrors ours and is set around the time of Industrial revolution drawing in similarities between Watt Tyler, the English civil war and a touch of Peterloo. The characters have some great lines and personalities and it's peppered with dark humour throughout. If you have a spare 30 hours to listen the time will fly by.
 
You had better order the next in the series now then, very amusing and convincing.

I finished Slow Horses last night - very enjoyable. I will be 'sourcing' the next in the series.

To the inevitable dismay of Flashman purists, tonight I start Thomas Blackwell's very recently-published book:

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Synopsis:
While many people have heard of the battle at Rorke’s Drift, (featured in the film Zulu) and the one at Isandlwana that preceded it, few outside of South Africa know of an earlier and equally bloody conflict. Under a tyrannical king, the Zulu nation defended its territory with ruthless efficiency against white settlers. Only a naïve English vicar, with his family and some translators are permitted to live in the king’s capital. It is into this cleric’s household that Thomas Flashman finds himself, as a most reluctant guest.

Listening to sermons of peace and tolerance against a background of executions and slaughter, Thomas is soon fleeing for his life, barely a spearpoint ahead of regiments of fearsome warriors. He is to learn that there is a fate even worse than his own death before being pitched in with Boers and British settlers as they fight a cunning and relentless foe. Thomas strives for his own salvation, before discovering that chance has not finished with him yet.


E2A: On 10 Oct on Facebook the author posted - "Facebook have objected to me promoting the cover of the book as it is too violent. Indeed, they have banned me promoting anything and so I will struggle to bring the series to the attention of fresh readers."

FFS!
 
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Ritch

LE
I'm reading Stephen Leather's new book, Slow Burn. As usual, the storyline isn't bad and it's an enjoyable read.

The only gripe I have with his books is that it seems every character in every book seems to have "slab-like teeth and nails bitten to the quick". It gets boring quickly. Also everyone always seems be nodding at each other at random times and the phrase "Secret Squirrel" is thrown around in each of his books like he's forgotten he's not ten and watching Danger Mouse.

Rant over.
 
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This WWII memoir of an NCO Royal Air Force pilot offers a vivid, personal account of wartime life and dangerous operations over Europe.

In 1941, Graham White was passing a Royal Air Force recruiting center and, on the spur of the moment, signed up. As a non-commissioned RAF pilot, he went on to fly long-range night-fighters against the Luftwaffe. White experienced badly designed and dangerous aircraft, such as the Beaufighter with its Merlin engine. But he also flew some of the finest planes ever built, like the “Wooden Wonder” Mosquito.

In this candid memoir, White offers a rare glimpse of what life was really like in that time of international crisis. He pulls no punches as he describes the blinding errors made by officers who conceived impossible operations for young airmen to fly. But he also shares tales of nights out on the town, when crews could relieve the stress of combat
An amusing and interesting book.
 

Sexton Blake

War Hero
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This WWII memoir of an NCO Royal Air Force pilot offers a vivid, personal account of wartime life and dangerous operations over Europe.

In 1941, Graham White was passing a Royal Air Force recruiting center and, on the spur of the moment, signed up. As a non-commissioned RAF pilot, he went on to fly long-range night-fighters against the Luftwaffe. White experienced badly designed and dangerous aircraft, such as the Beaufighter with its Merlin engine. But he also flew some of the finest planes ever built, like the “Wooden Wonder” Mosquito.

In this candid memoir, White offers a rare glimpse of what life was really like in that time of international crisis. He pulls no punches as he describes the blinding errors made by officers who conceived impossible operations for young airmen to fly. But he also shares tales of nights out on the town, when crews could relieve the stress of combat
An amusing and interesting book.
Another one added to the list of books to get, thank you.

It never ceases to amaze me of the bravery (massive minerals) displayed by so many young RAF and other nations (SA, CAN, AUS, NZ etc, etc) airman in WW2.

Even now 'new' accounts and books still come to light.

I was extremely fortunate in 1997 to meet a man named Brin Weare who, as a very young RAF aircrew SNCO on a Halifax sortie over Germany, was blown out of his aircraft by flak. He was the only survivor. Landed with no shoes on (a common occurrence apparently) and proceeded to walk from Germany to Northern France. On the way he was 'invited' by the Belgian Resistance to 'work with them' which he did for 6 months before he made it back to Blighty.

He was the first Chairman of the RAF Escaping Society.

I arranged for him to be a guest speaker at my old Unit. He was late 70's then and was married to a 30 years old who had just given birth to his baby!

Always immaculately turned out, unassuming and a pleasure to be with. I don't think he wrote a book on his experiences and he died sadly in 2000.

Apologies all for the thread drift here.

The RAFES was founded in 1945 as a non sectarian and non political society. In summary, its aims were to give financial assistance to surviving helpers and dependents of those who lost their lives assisting members of the Royal Air Forces to evade and escape make charitable donations in their countries to worthy causes, as an expression of thank encourage visits between the helpers and the helped foster good relations and friendship between their countries

In evading or escaping they forced the enemy to devote scarce resources to finding them. They also gave heart to the Allied Forces operating over enemy territory - aircrew knew it was possible to get back.Thousands of brave, ordinary people in the Occupied countries took extraordinary risks at huge cost to help these airmen

The first chairman of the AFES was Mr WTB Brin Weare, who was the Standard Bearer at the laying up of the RAFES Standards in Paris and Lincoln Cathedral in 1995.
 
Another one added to the list of books to get, thank you.

It never ceases to amaze me of the bravery (massive minerals) displayed by so many young RAF and other nations (SA, CAN, AUS, NZ etc, etc) airman in WW2.

Even now 'new' accounts and books still come to light.

I was extremely fortunate in 1997 to meet a man named Brin Weare who, as a very young RAF aircrew SNCO on a Halifax sortie over Germany, was blown out of his aircraft by flak. He was the only survivor. Landed with no shoes on (a common occurrence apparently) and proceeded to walk from Germany to Northern France. On the way he was 'invited' by the Belgian Resistance to 'work with them' which he did for 6 months before he made it back to Blighty.

He was the first Chairman of the RAF Escaping Society.

I arranged for him to be a guest speaker at my old Unit. He was late 70's then and was married to a 30 years old who had just given birth to his baby!

Always immaculately turned out, unassuming and a pleasure to be with. I don't think he wrote a book on his experiences and he died sadly in 2000.

Apologies all for the thread drift here.

The RAFES was founded in 1945 as a non sectarian and non political society. In summary, its aims were to give financial assistance to surviving helpers and dependents of those who lost their lives assisting members of the Royal Air Forces to evade and escape make charitable donations in their countries to worthy causes, as an expression of thank encourage visits between the helpers and the helped foster good relations and friendship between their countries

In evading or escaping they forced the enemy to devote scarce resources to finding them. They also gave heart to the Allied Forces operating over enemy territory - aircrew knew it was possible to get back.Thousands of brave, ordinary people in the Occupied countries took extraordinary risks at huge cost to help these airmen


The first chairman of the AFES was Mr WTB Brin Weare, who was the Standard Bearer at the laying up of the RAFES Standards in Paris and Lincoln Cathedral in 1995.

Thank you for posting this. I had the equal pleasure of meeting Brin in 1983 when I was tasked with parachuting seven members of the RAFES onto a DZ in Belgium. The late Fred Holroyd was in the chair that year and had dreamed up a charity scheme wherein they would re-enact their arrival by parachute onto previous enemy territory.

The RAF were quite nervous about the project and determined it could only be achieved under BPA ( Sport ) regulations. Mercifully, it all went well. That task left an indelible mark on my psyche and my name on their 'Man of the Year' award board.
 

Sexton Blake

War Hero
Apologies all as this book is not what I am 'reading right now' but having just read the synopsis in my newspaper this morning I wanted to highlight it. I know there are a lot of Falklands war buffs on this site.

Only just released.

Regards

 
I eased into this last night, reluctantly as there are only two after this one.

prussian-blue-6.jpg
 
I read this and I'm afraid I am is very close to throwing in the towel concerning his books, shame because I really enjoyed his earlier stuff.
I started reading Wilbur Smith in the 70s after seeing Shout at the Devil in the cinema. I can't say I've read all his books because I gave up after reading the first of the Egyptian ones. Surprised he's still alive TBH.
 

Sexton Blake

War Hero
I seem to have a problem with managing to post about books I am reading 'right now' as I keep posting about books I have yet to read or ones I have read!

Apologies all.

Therefore, in keeping with my normal state of rubbishness, here are the 2 I have just finished (of the 4 books I am always working on).

1. Lots of books exist about Allied POWs in WW2 but I found this an interesting read of the circa 2500 Japanese POWs held by the Brits/Indians in that theatre.
 

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Sexton Blake

War Hero
Having 'issues' posting pictures but book No 2 I found very interesting on the high level politics and interaction from our Ambassador in AFG and his relationships and discussions with Generals (Brit, US) and the world leaders involved in the recent campaign in AFG.
 

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Poppy

LE
Having 'issues' posting pictures but book No 2 I found very interesting on the high level politics and interaction from our Ambassador in AFG and his relationships and discussions with Generals (Brit, US) and the world leaders involved in the recent campaign in AFG.

I got this from a charity shop on Saturday, I'm looking forward to reading it
 
PJ O'Rourke's "All the Trouble in the World" from 1994. He comes out with this pearler:

"When are the world's political parties going to get appropriate symbols: snake, louse, jackal, outhouse, trash can, clown face, dildo, dollar bill with wings on it?"
 

Sexton Blake

War Hero
I got this from a charity shop on Saturday, I'm looking forward to reading it
I got my copy from a charity shop too!

I would say 90% of all my books are second hand and I assume that is quite the norm in the round.
 

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