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What are you reading right now?

Just finished Gerald Seymour’s Battle Sight Zero. One of his better Recent efforts, about a wannabe jihadi trying to smuggle an AK47 to the UK, interspersed with said particular rifle’s journey from factory in 1950s to the present day.

The Virgin Soldiers by Leslie Thomas - very funny and well written tale of National Servicemen in the Far East after WW2

We We’re Soldiers Once...and Young by Hal Moore - memoirs of a Vietnam War Colonel. Describes the first major battle of that war, Ia Drang, featured in the Mel Gibson film based on the book.
 

Poppy

LE
Just finished Gerald Seymour’s Battle Sight Zero. One of his better Recent efforts, about a wannabe jihadi trying to smuggle an AK47 to the UK, interspersed with said particular rifle’s journey from factory in 1950s to the present day.

The Virgin Soldiers by Leslie Thomas - very funny and well written tale of National Servicemen in the Far East after WW2

We We’re Soldiers Once...and Young by Hal Moore - memoirs of a Vietnam War Colonel. Describes the first major battle of that war, Ia Drang, featured in the Mel Gibson film based on the book.

I enjoy Gerald Seymour's books

I'm currently reading the latest John le Carre
 
Just sat this morning and started/finished Titania McGrath's latest book. Very, very funny and so well written that people clearly miss the satire.

Book mcGrath.JPG
 
Just sat this morning and started/finished Titania McGrath's latest book. Very, very funny and so well written that people clearly miss the satire.

View attachment 505619

I don't necessarily agree with everything he says, but he wrote a spoof article for the Independent which surprisingly is still online. The story behind it is in the second link. The Independent article actually has a hidden message in it - Titania McGrath wrote this you gullible hacks.


 
I just got a Chris Ryan "The History of the SAS" for father day (Im in Australia). Refreshing my son thought about a gift rather than a pair of socks, but I will refrain from commenting if a bottle of Jamieson would be more appreciated until I have read it.

Seems good so far, I assume the fact its "Told by the men on the ground" its not made up by Colin, I haven't got to the bit where Laba the Great Fijian tells his story of Oman, I have read enough books I could probably pick if he is regurgitating other peoples stories.

Point of note, the History isnt from the Long Range Desert Group, it starts after they were disbanded to TA and then reintroduced in Malaya.

Not a bad read but nothing really new, just a rehash of everything else you may have read, he doesn’t even hide it, quoting the Author and their book, I didn’t bother with the last two chapters and skimmed them as it was just the author inventing potential future conflicts.

Two main revelations, A Squadron were attacked by an A-10 in Iraq when it used an AIM-9 on them.

When attacking ISIS in their Jackals, they use Stingers on them.

Both these errors happen towards the end of the book where it becomes quite apparent as the chapters get shorter and the content he’s vaguer, there are even several blank pages after a letter from Norman Schwarzkopf, a Glossary and a Bibliography to quote all the books he copied from and embellished.
 
Peter's books are massive because his descriptions are insanely detailed. Unfortunately "Britain's Number One Science Fiction Writer" employs American English.
For now I'm enjoying what I'm reading. His world has its own identity and one can vividly feel and see what is happening. I'm still more than 700 pages away from the end, so it's too soon to recommend it.
Fallen Dragon is, for me, one of his best. It's a favourite alongside Joe Haldermans forever war trilogy and most things that William Gibson has written.

Problem with Sci Fi is the frequent requirement to let the Yank English slip by and just enjoy the stories. Though it's jarring from a British author.
 
Rereads of the following.
Screenshot_20200923-221152__01.jpg
Screenshot_20200923-221112__01.jpg


Been a few years now but still highly interesting and educational. Two very different snapshots of peacekeeping that took a dark turn and both well worth a read.

Certainly the UN are not always portrayed in a good light when it comes to internal politics and infighting during a crisis.
 

Ritch

LE
I decided to buy Mark "Billy" Billingham's (ex Para and SAS) book on Kindle. Not usually a fan of the "start of life through to modern day" books but this one is better than the others I've read in the past.

Not bad for three quid.
 
I decided to buy Mark "Billy" Billingham's (ex Para and SAS) book on Kindle. Not usually a fan of the "start of life through to modern day" books but this one is better than the others I've read in the past.

Not bad for three quid.
I'm about a quarter of the way through 'Riding Rockets' by Mike Mullane. One of the early shuttle astronauts.

It's pretty good and he's bluntly honest about a lot of aspects of the experience and quite funny at times too.

Refreshing change from many memoirs that are dry or somewhat hard to read.
 
I'm reading a book by Quentin Letts titled "patronising Bastards" which sort of exposes how the ruling elite and showbiz luvvies are taking the piss out of us.
By using the woke and Pc to control our behaviour.
 
Earlier this week I downloaded a number of free Audibooks .... " Rumpole of the Bailey " all read by Leo McKern ... excellent easy listening and I came across this ...


... again easy listening and it is about a pompous diarist ... Charles Pooter . Arthur Lowe is well chosen as the reader .... the character similarities between Charles Pooter and Captain Mainwaring add to the enjoyment .
 
I have finished Blue Rondo by John Lawton and very good it was too. The author takes plenty of time to get round to the main plot, but it moves along quite nicely with only one weird sexual episode. The main character is certainly a root rat.

I have not read any of Mick Herron's books, but thought I would give the first in the Slough House series a go:

64.jpg


Synopsis:

You don't stop being a spook just because you're no longer in the game.

Banished to Slough House from the ranks of achievers at Regent's Park for various crimes of drugs and drunkenness, lechery and failure, politics and betrayal, Jackson Lamb's misfit crew of highly trained joes don't run ops, they push paper.

But not one of them joined the Intelligence Service to be a 'slow horse'.

A boy is kidnapped and held hostage. His beheading is scheduled for live broadcast on the net. And whatever the instructions of the Service, the slow horses aren't going to just sit quiet and watch . . .
 
The current mrs_mush came home with the rations on Saturday and confessed to stealing. The stack of the Times' didn't have any magazine supplements with them so she snuck in a copy of The Guardian's weekend supplement into the copy of The Times that she bought.

I've not read The Guardian weekend magazine for years and it's hardly changed at all. Dull, knowing, arch, liberal and smug. In most weekend paper's supplements there's usually a '20 questions' piece to someone worthy (as parodied by Private Eye's 'my favourite spoon' column). All the usual suspect invariably have a question such as: 'Who do you most admire? / who's your greatest mentor? / etc'

The Guardian has instead 'Who do you most despise?'

Well that's the kinder, gentler politics then.

Discussing this with the current mrs_mush, she asked me "Well, go on then, who do you most despise?". I pointed out that there's far too much hate in the world and I don't intend to add to it. The world urgently needs love not hate. But there again, there's always Man Utd fans
 

RedDinger

Clanker
I enjoy Gerald Seymour's books

I'm currently reading the latest John le Carre
I've read all of Gerald Seymour's books. I've just finished Beyond Recall, and I'm suspicious about the author. It reads to me like someone impersonating his style. I'm wondering if he's going to be like Robert Ludlum, and carry on writing for years while being dead.
 
I've read all of Gerald Seymour's books. I've just finished Beyond Recall, and I'm suspicious about the author. It reads to me like someone impersonating his style. I'm wondering if he's going to be like Robert Ludlum, and carry on writing for years while being dead.

He's currently still alive.
 
I have finished Blue Rondo by John Lawton and very good it was too. The author takes plenty of time to get round to the main plot, but it moves along quite nicely with only one weird sexual episode. The main character is certainly a root rat.

I have not read any of Mick Herron's books, but thought I would give the first in the Slough House series a go:

View attachment 507887

Synopsis:

You don't stop being a spook just because you're no longer in the game.

Banished to Slough House from the ranks of achievers at Regent's Park for various crimes of drugs and drunkenness, lechery and failure, politics and betrayal, Jackson Lamb's misfit crew of highly trained joes don't run ops, they push paper.

But not one of them joined the Intelligence Service to be a 'slow horse'.

A boy is kidnapped and held hostage. His beheading is scheduled for live broadcast on the net. And whatever the instructions of the Service, the slow horses aren't going to just sit quiet and watch . . .
You had better order the next in the series now then, very amusing and convincing.
 

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