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What are you reading right now?

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A very fascinating read. Apart from anything else, the revelations of how poor Britain's defences against invasion in the period post Dunkirk should make those in charge of the defence budget sit up and take note.
 
Thank you for sharing that.

I am currently reading that a second time round. It is one of my collection that is/has been read exclusively 'on the throne'. Sorry if that is too much information!

Unlike other diaries which can be as dull as dishwater this one I find to be utterly riveting. Although you know how it all ends, so to speak, you still get that 'real time' sense of feeling such as the fall of Singapore and his absolute brilliance in understanding the greater strategy required to win WW2 and having to convince the USA of how to go about it.

Totally brilliant book, thank you.
That's where I read mine :D
 

Sexton Blake

War Hero
View attachment 504055
A very fascinating read. Apart from anything else, the revelations of how poor Britain's defences against invasion in the period post Dunkirk should make those in charge of the defence budget sit up and take note.
As someone mentioned a few pages back (apologies for not recalling the avatar or scrolling back) this thread is costing me a fortune!

I am now scouring ebay and ABEbooks to secure a copy of your posted book, The Last Ditch.

I always try for hardback, 1st editions with dustcover for all my books and fortunately Mrs SB puts up with this vice/hobby/OCD habit of mine. Bless her.
 
As someone mentioned a few pages back (apologies for not recalling the avatar or scrolling back) this thread is costing me a fortune!

I am now scouring ebay and ABEbooks to secure a copy of your posted book, The Last Ditch.

I always try for hardback, 1st editions with dustcover for all my books and fortunately Mrs SB puts up with this vice/hobby/OCD habit of mine. Bless her.
Let me know where to send it and I'll bung it in the post, dustcover and all.
 

Sexton Blake

War Hero
Let me know where to send it and I'll bung it in the post, dustcover and all.
PM inbound to you as I insist on paying you for the book and P&P.

God bless ya.
 
Just finished " Touched by angels" By Derek Jameson. A truly inspiring autobiography. By his own admission, an illegitimate, born into grinding poverty in the east end,( Strangely enough, not a mile away from where I was brought up in the 50's) rising to become a very popular Wireless talk show host, and his meteoric rise in fleet street, via the northern ireland, and Manchester press, to become the editor of the daily express, then the biggest circulation paper in the UK. A cracking read, and a object lesson on a truly, rags to riches fairy story.

Back in 1982, while working in Henry Pool, the Saville row tailors, doing some electrical work, in walked DJ, he was just the same in person, as you saw him on TV, that lovely lugubrious east london accent, a real nice bloke.
 
Anyone read this? It gets a bit of a drubbing on Amazon reviews for lazy research & being just a collection of dits from other books.
I’m tempted, but don’t want to waste £14 on a steaming pile.

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A Royal Navy helicopter pilot’s firsthand account of British Special Forces operations in the Falklands Islands and a failed raid on mainland Argentina.

In 1982, Argentina’s invasion of the Falkland Islands initiated an undeclared war with the United Kingdom. During the ten-week conflict, Colonel Richard Hutchings served as a commando helicopter pilot with 846 Naval Air Squadron flying Sea King helicopters. Though the sensitive nature of his experiences prevented him from telling his story for decades, Hutchings now provides a firsthand chronicle of the Falklands War, offering fascinating insight into the conduct of operations there.

Colonel Hutchings was charged with transporting Special Force units onto the enemy occupied islands, either to gather intelligence or conduct offensive operations, including the Special Air Service's successful Pebble Island raid and its ill-fated raid on mainland Argentina. That raid, known as Operation MIKADO, has been little discussed. But as Captain of the Sea King involved, Hutchings gives an authoritative account of what went wrong both in the air and on the ground. He details the circumstances of his crash-landing, encounters with the Chilean authorities and British diplomats in Santiago, as well as the debriefing in an MI6 safe house on return to the UK

I couldn't put it down.
 

Sexton Blake

War Hero
View attachment 504546
A Royal Navy helicopter pilot’s firsthand account of British Special Forces operations in the Falklands Islands and a failed raid on mainland Argentina.

In 1982, Argentina’s invasion of the Falkland Islands initiated an undeclared war with the United Kingdom. During the ten-week conflict, Colonel Richard Hutchings served as a commando helicopter pilot with 846 Naval Air Squadron flying Sea King helicopters. Though the sensitive nature of his experiences prevented him from telling his story for decades, Hutchings now provides a firsthand chronicle of the Falklands War, offering fascinating insight into the conduct of operations there.

Colonel Hutchings was charged with transporting Special Force units onto the enemy occupied islands, either to gather intelligence or conduct offensive operations, including the Special Air Service's successful Pebble Island raid and its ill-fated raid on mainland Argentina. That raid, known as Operation MIKADO, has been little discussed. But as Captain of the Sea King involved, Hutchings gives an authoritative account of what went wrong both in the air and on the ground. He details the circumstances of his crash-landing, encounters with the Chilean authorities and British diplomats in Santiago, as well as the debriefing in an MI6 safe house on return to the UK

I couldn't put it down.
Just ordered it off ebay thanks to your post.

Regards
 
Re reading Alexei Sayle's book, Thatcher Stole My Trousers.
Although raised a Communist, he didn't really seem to buy into the teachings of Marx and Engels, and had aspiration to improve himself. He didn't really want to spend his life stood on a picket line, and talks about the absurdity of hard left politics of the seventies and eighties.
Oh, and it's very funny.
 
Re reading Alexei Sayle's book, Thatcher Stole My Trousers.
Although raised a Communist, he didn't really seem to buy into the teachings of Marx and Engels, and had aspiration to improve himself. He didn't really want to spend his life stood on a picket line, and talks about the absurdity of hard left politics of the seventies and eighties.
Oh, and it's very funny.
see also:

Stalin ate my homework.
 
As someone mentioned a few pages back (apologies for not recalling the avatar or scrolling back) this thread is costing me a fortune!

I am now scouring ebay and ABEbooks to secure a copy of your posted book, The Last Ditch.

I always try for hardback, 1st editions with dustcover for all my books and fortunately Mrs SB puts up with this vice/hobby/OCD habit of mine. Bless her.



My bold..
Mrs Sig as well, as our living room has a motley collection of book cases, and more than a few hundred excellent books.
 
On my bedside table waiting to be read is an autographed copy of 'Wings on my Sleeve' by Winkle Brown. As a slight non-sequitur, I can't recommend his Desert Island Discs episode highly enough. What a man.
 
On my bedside table waiting to be read is an autographed copy of 'Wings on my Sleeve' by Winkle Brown. As a slight non-sequitur, I can't recommend his Desert Island Discs episode highly enough. What a man.

I heard it broadcast live ... what a man ... lived a life to the full and more ... my Bold still available on BBC ...

 
Having raced through Stephen Leather's New York Night, I have now started this, the fifth in John Lawton's Inspector Troy series:

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Synopsis:

Written by 'a sublimely elegant historical novelist as addictive as crack' (Daily Telegraph), the Inspector Troy series is perfect for fans of Le Carré, Philip Kerr and Alan Furst.

An old flame has returned to Troy's life: Kitty Stilton, now wife of an American presidential hopeful, has come back to London, and with her, an unwelcome guest.

Private eye Joey Rork has been hired to make sure Kitty's amorous liaisons don't ruin her husband's political career. But before Rork can dig any dirt, he meets a gruesome end...

But he isn't the only one, and with the body-count mounting is it possible that the blood trail leads back to Troy's police force and into his own forgotten past?
 
Just finished Gerald Seymour’s Battle Sight Zero. One of his better Recent efforts, about a wannabe jihadi trying to smuggle an AK47 to the UK, interspersed with said particular rifle’s journey from factory in 1950s to the present day.

The Virgin Soldiers by Leslie Thomas - very funny and well written tale of National Servicemen in the Far East after WW2

We We’re Soldiers Once...and Young by Hal Moore - memoirs of a Vietnam War Colonel. Describes the first major battle of that war, Ia Drang, featured in the Mel Gibson film based on the book.
 

Poppy

LE
Just finished Gerald Seymour’s Battle Sight Zero. One of his better Recent efforts, about a wannabe jihadi trying to smuggle an AK47 to the UK, interspersed with said particular rifle’s journey from factory in 1950s to the present day.

The Virgin Soldiers by Leslie Thomas - very funny and well written tale of National Servicemen in the Far East after WW2

We We’re Soldiers Once...and Young by Hal Moore - memoirs of a Vietnam War Colonel. Describes the first major battle of that war, Ia Drang, featured in the Mel Gibson film based on the book.

I enjoy Gerald Seymour's books

I'm currently reading the latest John le Carre
 

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