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What are you reading right now?

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
With British Snipers to the Reich


don't know why the link isn't working for you, sorry. other people can see it ok.
Such are the mysteries of the Interweb ... thanks for the info .

ETA ... Kindle version downloaded ... for <50p you cannot go wrong .
 
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“Roth’s three journals were discovered many years after his disappearance, tucked away in the home of his brother. After his brother’s death, his family discovered them and sent them to Rosel, Roth’s wife. In time, Rosel handed down the journals to Erika, Roth’s only daughter, who had emigrated to America. Roth was likely working on a fourth journal before he was reported missing in action in July 1944. Although his ultimate fate remains unknown, what he did leave behind, now finally revealed, is an incredible firsthand account of the horrific war the Germans waged in Russia”

The writing is a bit flowery and his tendency to portray the Germans as victims is annoying but overall a decent read.
 
I just finished reading James Ellroy's "This Storm", his second novel in his second LA Quartet.

It's readable, but it was more like an ordeal that had to be borne instead of a pleasure, as he seems to be coasting on the legacy of his great novels like LA Confidential and The Big Nowhere.

Not worth buying, but it's worth checking out of the library.
 
The Fighting Temeraire the legend of Trafalgar by Sam Willis.
sam willis temerrair.png


every so often, a non fiction comes my way that educates me about areas of History that I thought I knew about. Thought I knew about Trafalgar, But the description of Temeraire's heroic action has changed my opinion about the whole battle. I had never really thought about prison hulks before, and what life was like for the men inside. No contemporary details survive of what work was done to convert a ship to a hulk. Temeraire was relegated to the ignoble state of a prison hunk after her bright career was over and she had become obsolete as a ship of the line, then she was thrown a lifeline and was refitted as a receiving ship, taking recently trained recruits before their first deployments, then years later, once again refitted as a Victuelling ship, a supply ship, chained at her moorings, ships to be Victuelled drew up alongside. Then when she was too costly to keep afloat, she was towed up the Thames to be broken up, and was immortalized in Will Turners Painting, voted Britains Favourite painting in 2005.

I have to quote some impressive figures from the book...
between 1793 to 1815 the RN lost just 5 ships of the line & 16 Frigates. while her enemies lost 92 in the American war, and 172 lost in the Napoleonic war, one of the most remarkable combat records in History.
 
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The Fighting Temeraire the legend of Trafalgar by Sam Willis.
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every so often, a non fiction comes my way that educates me about areas of History that I thought I knew about. Thought I knew about Trafalgar, But the description of Temeraire's heroic action has changed my opinion about the whole battle. I had never really thought about prison hulks before, and what life was like for the men inside. No contemporary details survive of what work was done to convert a ship to a hulk. Temeraire was relegated to the ignoble state of a prison hunk after her bright career was over and she had become obsolete as a ship of the line, then she was thrown a lifeline and was refitted as a receiving ship, taking recently trained recruits before their first deployments, then years later, once again refitted as a Victuelling ship, a supply ship, chained at her moorings, ships to be Victuelled drew up alongside. Then when she was too costly to keep afloat, she was towed up the Themes to be broken up, and was immortalized in Will Turners Painting, voted Britains Favourite painting in 2005.

I have to quote some impressive figures from the book...
between 1793 to 1815 the RN lost just 5 ships of the line & 16 Frigates. while her enemies lost 92 in the American war, and 172 lost in the Napoleonic war, one of the most remarkable combat records in History.
If that's the Sam Willis I think it is, he has done some good stuff on BBC 4.
 
If that's the Sam Willis I think it is, he has done some good stuff on BBC 4.

The one and only........................ A thoroughly engaging chap, equally on the topics of shipwrecks, pirates and highwaymen. I'm not to enchanted with his singing however.
 
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Just finished the 3 books. I admit when I turned over page 704 of the last book, I felt a degree of relief. Felt I had run a couple of marathons by the end. I suppose on the whole I enjoyed them but Lisbeth is somewhat of an anti-hero, and sometimes I felt like giving her a couple of smacks around the head. The computer hacking as described in the books is also somewhat farfetched. Will I read any more? Nope.

I've been advised (on here) that the three subsequent books (not written by Larsson but by David Lagerkrantz) are not worth the effort. I enjoyed the Larsson books, but I read them after watching the films.
 
I started this last night:

the-merry-misogynist-2.jpg


Synopsis:
Somebody in Laos is wooing and wedding country girls - and then killing them on honeymoon and binding their bodies to trees. The horror of what this monster does to his victims appals Dr Siri and his morgue team and they vow revenge.
But they're distracted by the disappearance of itinerant Crazy Rajid. Siri has been getting premonitions that he's in danger. A trail of elaborate clues and remarkable disclosures about the Indian's past lead them to Vientiane's most ancient temple - and a terrible discovery.
 
Are the films worth watching?

They are in my queue to watch again, so I'd say yes. My versions are sub-titled, but I've just looked and YouTube have an English-dubbed version of the first one.


Edited multiple times to try to get the URL to go to the start of the film!
 
I started this last night:

View attachment 501808

Synopsis:
Somebody in Laos is wooing and wedding country girls - and then killing them on honeymoon and binding their bodies to trees. The horror of what this monster does to his victims appals Dr Siri and his morgue team and they vow revenge.
But they're distracted by the disappearance of itinerant Crazy Rajid. Siri has been getting premonitions that he's in danger. A trail of elaborate clues and remarkable disclosures about the Indian's past lead them to Vientiane's most ancient temple - and a terrible discovery.
Any good so far??
 
Any good so far??

I like his books, this is the sixth out of eight featuring this main character. Cotterill's books are almost whimsical, but with occasional savagery. He appears to know his Lao PDR.
 
I've read "The Day of The Jackal" more times than I care to remember so was pleasantly surprised when the audio book appeared in my YouTube feed.



There area few disjointed bits where it has obviously been re-recorded but not bad overall. The narrator is Stuart Prebble. My only previous experience of audio books was Andy McNab's "Bravo Two Zero", which was pretty good for my insomnia.

Anyway, spurred on by this I thought that I would try the audio book of "The Hunt for Red October". Sadly a great book ruined by a narrator who can only seem to do caricature accents. I can just about tolerate the mispronunciation of "Basil" as "Bay-Zil", but after four hours when the narrator gave the British Sea Harrier pilot the sort of cockney accent that made Dick Van Dyke sound credible, I gave up.
 

danielwayne

Clanker
I'm a massive science fiction fan.
However, I never read “Britain's Number One Science Fiction Writer”, Peter F. Hamilton. I'm now reading his Great North Road (I chose this one because its setting is my city, Newcastle). Well written and intriguing until now. Peter sure loves to write gargantuan books (+ 1000 pages).

Also reading A New World Begins: The History of the French Revolution by Jeremy Potkin.
 
Just browsing through the bookshelves today and pulled out my copy of Puckoon , by Spike Milligan , bought in the late 70’s . The first time I read it there were tears running down my cheeks … just two quotes … “Many people die of thirst but the Irish are born with one.” … “Patience, thought Milligan, that word was invented by dull buggers who couldn't think quick enough.” … and for those in the know one word “ Squrrox “ . An exceedingly funny book and easy to read .

I went on to buy , read , enjoy and keep all of his WW2 books and a few of his Poetry books which I did not enjoy .

Anyhoo … the photograph below is but some of my collection … well thumbed , bedraggled but well read ….

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… A few years ago Mrs B_R bought me a complete set of all his works for an incredibly low price in a book sale … they are still in the box they came in because I cannot bring myself to throw out my originals which have brought much pleasure …. strange old world .
Just reread his war memoirs for the third time since getting them. Wish I could have met the guy.

I'm planning a trip to Woy Woy in NSW (the greatest above ground cemetery in Australia) when COVID settles down to view the Spike Milligan collection at the local library.
 
Just finished ‘Prisoners of Geography: ten maps that tell you everything you need to know about Global Politics” by Tim Marshall. Excellent read.
 

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