What are you reading right now?

Were they trying to scam assistance?
The reason I got to know about it was that some claimed to be setting up charities to fund mine clearance, and the MA asked me to sit in on some meetings with them.

There have been a couple of veteran’s charities that have helped fund projects (VVMF being one of them) but we never understood the walts.
 
He's on FaceBook. So a friend told me . . .
Unfortunately, I am not on Faceache, and have no plans to join either that or Twitter (I feel that American conglomerates have far too much info on us already - why give them any more?) - pity, I would have liked to have contacted him.
 
Unfortunately, I am not on Faceache, and have no plans to join either that or Twitter (I feel that American conglomerates have far too much info on us already - why give them any more?) - pity, I would have liked to have contacted him.
He has a website for his books and it has a 'Contact Me' page too.

 
Fully support those who have recommended ( @DaveDaffe and @Sexton Blake ) Kriss Dhillon and her Curry Secrets book, my favourite cookery book for curries.
Also the shout (@Gluteus Maximus and @Poppy )for the Bryant and May series by Christopher Fowler, a bit on the strange side but well worth persisting with.

Currently reading “The Water of the Hills” by Marcel Pagnol a saga of Provençal life, countryside, legends and people. Set between the wars, it is an epic story of family tragedy, betrayal and revenge. Possibly better known by the two films “Jean de Florette“ and “Manon of the Springs“ by Claude Berri.
 
Fully support those who have recommended ( @DaveDaffe and @Sexton Blake ) Kriss Dhillon and her Curry Secrets book, my favourite cookery book for curries.
Also the shout (@Gluteus Maximus and @Poppy )for the Bryant and May series by Christopher Fowler, a bit on the strange side but well worth persisting with.

Currently reading “The Water of the Hills” by Marcel Pagnol a saga of Provençal life, countryside, legends and people. Set between the wars, it is an epic story of family tragedy, betrayal and revenge. Possibly better known by the two films “Jean de Florette“ and “Manon of the Springs“ by Claude Berri.
It really is a cracking book to be honest. I just have to get around to getting ingredients in and try some of the recipes.
 
It really is a cracking book to be honest. I just have to get around to getting ingredients in and try some of the recipes.
The only downside being aroma given off when cooking the basic sauce of onions, garlic and ginger, tends to fill the house even with an extractor on full, it lingerS somewhat and any clothes you wear will require washing.
 
The only downside being aroma given off when cooking the basic sauce of onions, garlic and ginger, tends to fill the house even with an extractor on full, it lingerS somewhat and any clothes you wear will require washing.
Will put the air extractor in the kitchen on full blast and shower and throw my clothes in washer when done. Good advice cheers!!
 

Sexton Blake

Old-Salt
Rather a niche subject and I am in no way anti American, quite the opposite, but I found this very interesting and does perhaps explain some of my personal encounters with our US cousins as well as wider perceptions that 'we' sometimes pick up on over the years.

I trust Sandhurst instructors get to peruse this.

Written by a bloke who instructed at West Point for many years. I read it in 3 sittings!
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Sexton Blake

Old-Salt
To add some balance this is the premier account (my view) of a study of military incompetence and the characteristics of poor Officers and NCO's we may have served with. I include my failings in this too.

Not strictly a 'book I am reading right now' but always to hand.

Military blunders (regardless of nation) and poor leadership/management is one of my number one topics of study. I know it will not be others but I may post a few more titles here over the next few days.

I have 4 books on the go at any one time. Yes, I live on the edge.

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Edited to state that this book is referenced quite a bit on this site in other forums/threads. Apologies for the repetition.
 
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sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
History of Freemasonry in England from 1567 to 1813 by Leon Hyneman.
first published 1878.

Its realy a commentary of Andersons constitutions and Prestons masonry illustrated. It's a typical masonic theory type tome. The author basis his main premise on a supposed " rebellion" of free masons in 1717 who broke away from the grand Lodge of Yorke . However when he quotes the revolution he missed the point it was the Jacobite rebellion that was being mentioned in his source matirieal . Then in true masonic form he goes on to talk about " as we have seen from the rebellion" , as you know the from " rebellion " ,as recorded during " the rebellion" and so forth.

AS a review and potted history of the pre 1717 grand lodge , (which wasn't a grand lodge just an agreement by four lodges to revive the old tradition of a grand lodge feast) You payes yer money and takes yer chance. Hyneman is absolutely convinced that Sir Christopher wren was both Grand Master of all masons and held other posts in an ancient pre 1717revival . WITHOUT a shred of real evidence to back this up, I mention this because after 300 years Freemasons are still arguing and writing about this point. So far there is only one piece of contemporaneous written " proof " that he was Grand Master but it 's not enough to actually prove the point .

I only put this here because of lock down and I'm desperate for something to read. I have Matterhorn stashed away for a re read but its in a junk cupboard and I will have to shift tons of stuff to get it out again.
I'm so desperate that I have even been reading my old instruction manuals for stuff that I still cant work !!

Did I tell you that I actually met that there Michael Baigent ????
 

Sexton Blake

Old-Salt
This is an absolute belter of a read (if you are into this sort of thing of course). I would put a bet on the strong possibility that the author is a contributor/lurker on this site.

Written by a Brit and using British examples and interviews from WW2, Korea, Falklands, Iraq, Afgahn etc. From Para Regt, RM, Inf, Armour et al.

If you are involved in trg, or have a colleague who is, read it or put them onto it. This book is not only thought provoking but utterly brilliantly.

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Sexton Blake

Old-Salt
I am not attempting to up my post rate by any means but I leave 3 further books below which may appeal to anyone with an interest in military failure and causes there of.

Plus the first book is an ideal 'leaving gift' to any RAF person you may work with at some point!

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Having finished John le Carre's The Spy Who Came in from the Cold last night I was struck by how much the film adhered to the book. I will search out the two books le Carre wrote before The Spy.

I have now started this:

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Synopsis:

Beautiful seductive and extremely dangerous Franca Tantardini is one of Italy's most ruthless political extremists. When she is captured in a shoot-out her fanatical young lover Giancarlo Battestini vows to set her free and with quiet watchfulness waits for the moment to strike.

In Rome a British businessman Geoffery Harrison has been taken hostage by a ruthless organised crime syndicate - kidnap is after all a growth industry. The British Government are adamant that they will not pay the two-million-dollar ransom and discharge responsibility to the Italian police. As political wrangling takes hold Battestini sees a weakness and realises that the only way to secure the release of his beloved Franca is to capture Harrison and bargain his life for hers.

The authorities are confronted with a terrible choice. Should they release a woman who has masterminded the murder of so many or let an innocent man die?
 
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Well worth a look especially the chapters covering the post US involvement and subsequent betrayal.
 
That's Gerald Seymour's Red Fox polished off, and a good read it was.

Tonight I start this, Timothy Hallinan's final book in the Poke Rafferty series:

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Synopsis:

Eight years ago, Poke Rafferty, an American travel writer, and his Thai wife, Rose, adopted a Bangkok street child named Miaow, forming an unconventional intercultural family. That family has weathered extreme challenges—each of its three members carried the scars of a painful and dangerous history—but has stuck together with tenacity and love (and a little help from some friends).

Now that family is in jeopardy: the birth of Poke and Rose’s newborn son has littered their small apartment with emotional land mines, forcing Poke to question his identity as a dad and Miaow to question her identity as a daughter. At the same time, the most cantankerous member of the small gang of Old Bangkok Hands who hang out at the Expat Bar suddenly goes missing under suspicious circumstances. Engaged in the search for the missing American, Poke is caught completely off-guard when someone he thought was gone forever resurfaces—and she has the power to tear the Raffertys apart.
 
A few on my hols reading list:

The Death of Grass by John Christopher - filmed as No Blade of Grass - about a post-apocalyptic world where a Chinese virus has killed the world's grass, which specie includes an awful lot of crops.

Prince of Thieves by Chuck Hogan - filmed as The Town

Battle Sight Zero by Gerald Seymour - tracing the journey of an AK47 from its factory to the present day
 
To add some balance this is the premier account (my view) of a study of military incompetence and the characteristics of poor Officers and NCO's we may have served with. I include my failings in this too.

Not strictly a 'book I am reading right now' but always to hand.

Military blunders (regardless of nation) and poor leadership/management is one of my number one topics of study. I know it will not be others but I may post a few more titles here over the next few days.

I have 4 books on the go at any one time. Yes, I live on the edge.

View attachment 484528

Edited to state that this book is referenced quite a bit on this site in other forums/threads. Apologies for the repetition.
Required reading for Intelligence Corps JNCOs. Helps enormously in learning how to answer the (very occasional) patronising and/or insulting questions at the end of a briefing.
 

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