What are you reading right now?


A Submariner's Story by Lt Joel Blamey, DSC, DSM

You couldn't make a film of this - nobody'd believe it. 35 years service in the RN, 28 years in submarines in peace and war; depth-charged over 200 times; the privations, the heat, the danger, bravery, resilience, endurance and unique camaraderie, it's all here. Couldn't put it down. Something I didn't know: the operating depth of a WW2 sub was only about 250 ft (although PORPOISE, Blamey's first wartime boat, was restricted to 200ft due to damage). The boat is only 290ft long itself. And if you're interested in engineering, it's even more un-put-down-able.
 
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As often with Tolstoï, it's better to read it with a notebook or the corresponding Wikipedia page opened as the gallery of characters is very extensive and one can get lost...
 

Scorcher68

Old-Salt
Stephen Fry's Mythos. Fry like me has held a life long love affair with Greek Mythology. Alas as I am not touched by the muses to the degree he is I cannot write about them in such an eloquent manner.
 
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Girl with Dragon tattoo,very absorbing,might try his next one.
 
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Have just started this about a murder in East Berlin during the Cold War. Interesting start, with the interplay between the Stasi and the local murder comission. Very Bernie Guntheresque.
When you finish you can read Stasi Wolf by the same author. Both are excellent.
 
I'm starting this tonight:

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It is actually the fifteenth in the Vincent Calvino series. I am re-reading it as when I discovered the author I did not realise that it was one of a series which are chronological. Moore has recently published the seventeenth and final book in the series.

Synopsis:
In Crackdown visual art becomes a powerful take down tool to push back against the oligarchs. People adjust to the surveillance state and its agents who are emergent forces. Post-coup Thailand is the setting as high tech competes with traditional power in a battle for hearts and minds. It is a noir landscape where Calvino finds himself ambushed as casualties from this battle leave behind a mystery or two. Calvino enters a world of ancient maps, political graffiti, student protesters and murder. The finger points at Calvino as the killer. He searches for allies who will help him prove his innocence.
 
As a counterpoint to the mostly excellent offerings on this thread, I was recently treated to a short clip from Good Reads. Obviously a Lockdown read, the author was Troy SomethingorOther, his main protagonist Brett 'Crusader' Whatever, an ex-SEALGRUDELTASAS thingy: the opening paragraph contained the immortal line, ' . . . Brett glanced at his Rolex Oyster and saw that it was a quarter after 0400 . . . '.

Reader, I went and turned the ground for some late 'taters.
 
I started this as my day-time non-fiction read today:

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Synopsis:

I look down at my boots and wait for the humiliation that is sure to come when someone is forced to take me in their team as the last option.
“I’ll take Rach,” says Fred.
And with that decision, he changes the whole shape of my military career and everything I think about myself.
During chopper flights into unsecured airfields, on the receiving end of a face-ripping, through the hi jinks of field life and into the moments before setting off on patrol in Afghanistan, Rach Ranton explores the actions and behaviours of those who led her through the most volatile and unpredictable of situations.
Their words and actions echoing through her life, Rach tells the stories of those leaders who lifted her up, encouraged her to be her best and helped her find the purpose in her work.
Leaders who were not fearless but who did not shy from facing their fears. Who were authentically themselves, openly sharing their failures and weaknesses. Who were bold, took risks and who were forced to make critical decisions in extreme circumstances. Those who succeed on the battlefield, in the boardroom and in business.
Dauntless leaders


The author was an EW operator who served with INTERFET, the Australian-led operation to oversee the departure from East Timor of Indonesian forces and stabilisation after the murderous rampage by the militia in 1999. She later served in Afghanistan.

I was encouraged when on only the second page of the prologue the author talks about a trickle of sweat running through her bum-crack. that bodes well for the rest of the book!
 
Started re-reading ,Game Set and Match,really like Len Deighton. 'Bomber' was the finest anti war book I have read,way up in Cruel Sea class.
 
‘If this is a man‘ by Pimo Levi:
Primo Levi's Holocaust memoirs stand among the best literature of the 20th century.

Shocking insight into the reality of the Holocaust, through the eyes of Primo Levi.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
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Oh well, it has to be done. Self isolating should be entertaining.
 
I’m currently reading this, which is very good.
It starts off with the development of the RAF from the RFC & also their early aircraft throughout WW1 up until the 1930s
There’s also a bio of Arthur Harris & other high ranking officers.
Also mentioned is the disappointment of the Avro Manchester, which morphed into the Lancaster.
It then turns to ‘The Crew’, where they’re from, their training, how they crew up etc & follows their progress to 97 Sqn at Bourn.

The author also mentions this book by Jörg Friedrich & I wondered if anyone had read it & was it worth my hard earned cash. I ask, as I particularly enjoy books written from the perspective of the ‘runners up’.

 
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I’m currently reading this, which is very good.
It starts off with the development of the RAF from the RFC & also their early aircraft throughout WW1 up until the 1930s
There’s also a bio of Arthur Harris & other high ranking officers.
Also mentioned is the disappointment of the Avro Manchester, which morphed into the Lancaster.
It then turns to ‘The Crew’, where they’re from, their training, how they crew up etc & follows their progress to 97 Sqn at Bourn.

The author also mentions this book by Jörg Friedrich & I wondered if anyone had read it & was it worth my hard earned cash. I ask, as I particularly enjoy books written from the perspective of the ‘runners up’.

Some of the reviews are interesting, thanks for mentioning it
 

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