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Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Amazon don't let me rummage before I buy!
Have you tried any of the John Shakespear books by Rory Clements?
John the brother of Will works for Francis Wallsingham. His intelligencer work in the setting of Elizabethan England makes for a truly great read, mixing fiction with fact they are great stories and I’m sure they won’t disappoint.

trying to put up a link but it won’t work. Any way you’ve guessed available on Amazon.
 
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sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
Sorry if its cheating but I am now in to you-tube free audio-books. I've avoided to hell and back by Audry Murphey in the past thinking that it would be all Hollywood , however it turned out to be a smashing piece of work. Also was Carlos Hathcote a Viet Nam sniper with 93 confirmed kills, a joy to listen to . The only problem with these is that after 20 minutes I drop of to sleep so Ive had to replay them at least three time each.
 
Sorry if its cheating but I am now in to you-tube free audio-books. I've avoided to hell and back by Audry Murphey in the past thinking that it would be all Hollywood , however it turned out to be a smashing piece of work. Also was Carlos Hathcote a Viet Nam sniper with 93 confirmed kills, a joy to listen to . The only problem with these is that after 20 minutes I drop of to sleep so Ive had to replay them at least three time each.
Did notice a couple of titles appear while watching Nero Wolfe

If anyone fancies Quebec murder inc
Try the series by Louise Penny, best to read in order
 
Sorry if its cheating but I am now in to you-tube free audio-books. I've avoided to hell and back by Audry Murphey in the past thinking that it would be all Hollywood , however it turned out to be a smashing piece of work. Also was Carlos Hathcote a Viet Nam sniper with 93 confirmed kills, a joy to listen to . The only problem with these is that after 20 minutes I drop of to sleep so Ive had to replay them at least three time each.
I've got a load of Roman and Greek history audiobooks on my itunes narrated by a guy called Charlton Griffin and, while I love the topic.... his voice just has a ridiculously soothing tone to it. Took me weeks to listen through a whole one in the evenings as I'd zzzzz out.
 
I've got a load of Roman and Greek history audiobooks on my itunes narrated by a guy called Charlton Griffin and, while I love the topic.... his voice just has a ridiculously soothing tone to it. Took me weeks to listen through a whole one in the evenings as I'd zzzzz out.
20 min timer on iPhone,iPad or laptop it takes a while but works
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Sorry if its cheating but I am now in to you-tube free audio-books. I've avoided to hell and back by Audry Murphey in the past thinking that it would be all Hollywood , however it turned out to be a smashing piece of work. Also was Carlos Hathcote a Viet Nam sniper with 93 confirmed kills, a joy to listen to . The only problem with these is that after 20 minutes I drop of to sleep so Ive had to replay them at least three time each.
Murphy's autobiography is actually a masterpiece in understatement, and I found him to be rather self=effacing. The word 'hero' is bandied about freely but I do believe it applied to him
 
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Battalion 3/5 suffered the highest number of casualties in the war in Afghanistan. This is the story of one platoon in that distinguished battalion.
Aware of U.S. plans to withdraw from the country, knowing their efforts were only a footprint in the sand, the fifty Marines of 3rd Platoon fought in Sangin, the most dangerous district in all of Afghanistan. So heavy were the casualties that the Secretary of Defense offered to pull the Marines out. Instead, they pushed forward. Each Marine in 3rd Platoon patrolled two and a half miles a day for six months--a total of one million steps--in search of a ghostlike enemy that struck without warning. Why did the Marines attack and attack, day after day?

Every day brought a new skirmish. Each footfall might trigger an IED. Half the Marines in 3rd Platoon didn't make it intact to the end of the tour. One Million Steps is the story of the fifty brave men who faced these grim odds and refused to back down. Based on Bing West's embeds with 3rd Platoon, as well as on their handwritten log, this is a gripping grunt's-eye view of life on the front lines of America's longest war. Writing with a combat veteran's compassion for the fallen, West also offers a damning critique of the higher-ups who expected our warriors to act as nation-builders--and whose failed strategy put American lives at unnecessary risk.

Each time a leader was struck down, another rose up to take his place. How does one man instill courage in another? What welded these men together as firmly as steel plates?

This remarkable book is the story of warriors caught between a maddening, unrealistic strategy and their unswerving commitment to the fight. Fearsome, inspiring, and poignant in its telling, One Million Steps is sure to become a classic, a unique and enduring testament to the American warrior spirit.

An interesting book and I like West as an author but it's a bit 'American' for obvious reasons.
 

Poppy

LE
thriller called "Secret Service" by Tom Bradby - quite good so far

I haven't read any of his others. It's a light read which is what I want right now
 

Poppy

LE
Asda Tesco Sainsbury’s all sell books granted it’s often a in the moment book, better than buying every magazine though
are any local independent bookshops doing delivery service?
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Just been having a retrospective period; Harold Coyle, Team Yankee, The Ten Thousand and Trial by Fire. Also - on a seperate platform - re-reading 'Armageddon'd Song'
 
Just been having a retrospective period; Harold Coyle, Team Yankee, The Ten Thousand and Trial by Fire. Also - on a seperate platform - re-reading 'Armageddon'd Song'
Love Harold Coyles books. Though Sword Point is well worth a read alongside those 3. Coyle, along with Reeman, Cornwell, Gemmell and Pratchett, basically formed most of my fiction reading when I was growing up. All hold a fond place in my literary heart, though Cornwell feels to have fallen by the wayside somewhat in recent years.
 
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no f in beer

Old-Salt
Finished Sir Terry P's Pyramids yesterday, forgot what a wonderful book that is.

Now half way throught Guards!Guards!, re-reading the early descriptions of Vimes,Colon,Nobby and Carrot, plus the budding romance between Vimes and Sybil, glorious stuff.

T'other half has ordered me the next 8 books, just hope the delivery system is still working
 
Currently on book four (Zoe's Tale) of the Old Man's War series by John Scalzi.
Set in the future where mankind has begun to colonise the stars only to find that other species are doing the same and it is a violent competition.
The premise of the story is that Earth residents can join the colonial defence forces at 75. You are given a new, young body with enhancements and set out to defend the colonies. The only thing is, you can never go back to Earth and if you survive 12 years - and not many do - you get a new 'normal' body and can become a colonist yourself.
The first book isn't the best written, but Scalzi soon finds his form from the second onward. It deals with the colonisation and defence of a large area of space very well and there is action and plots aplenty.
Recommended if like me, you have taken a break from sci-fi for a while.
Can be picked up used on Amazon for very little.
 
Just about to start reading this as I'm nearly finished with David Mearns' excellent 'The Shipwreck Hunter'
 
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