What are you reading right now?

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Not sure. Looks like a fiver off the cover price.
Or is this a wah?
£15.720 hardback or £8.99 paperback on Amazon. RRP £25.00.
As per my earlier post I’m not sure how Waterstones survive.
 
Just finised David Nobbs's Reggie Perrin omnibus, and I'm glad it's over. I thought the first two books were excellent (just like the series) but the last book was an ordeal (just like the series). There were some off-putting things like Jimmy "cock-up on the catering front" sleeping with his niece not just once but multiple times which I found did nothing for the story as a whole.
 
Halfway through Tiamat's Wrath - like all of The Expanse book buggered if I know what the title has to do with anything.

I bought it off The Book People in hardback last year when Amazon wanted nearly 20 quid and similar amounts for the kindle version where I have the rest of the series.
Having bought 6&7 on the Kindle at the same time I only got round to it last week......noting that Amazon are now selling the Kindle version for 6 quid :mad:

Anyway so far so good fantastic special effects ;) and an interesting story line that's leaving me wondering if, when I reach the end, they can milk another from the series.
 

Tiger-Monkey2

War Hero
"Rise and Kill First: The secret history of Israeli's targeted assassinations", by Ronan Bergman.

It is a very good read. A very balanced account of what the Israeli's have been up to and why. It is certainly no anti-Israeli rant while at the same time it does nothing to white wash some very dark chapters of Israel's military and intelligence history and politics.
 
"Rise and Kill First: The secret history of Israeli's targeted assassinations", by Ronan Bergman.

It is a very good read. A very balanced account of what the Israeli's have been up to and why. It is certainly no anti-Israeli rant while at the same time it does nothing to white wash some very dark chapters of Israel's military and intelligence history and politics.
Any chance of ahem auctioning it off for charity, i may have a few euros to spare for a good cause….
 
The latest Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London series has landed in my Kindle. I hope the series isn't going downhill.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
The latest Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London series has landed in my Kindle. I hope the series isn't going downhill.
Same here. My copy arrived today but I've not started it yet. I'm putting off the pleasure until I have some peace and quiet. Probably in 2022
 
Trampled Under Foot: The Power and Excess of Led Zeppelin @Kirkz
  • ISBN-10: 0571259359
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571259359

    View attachment 450184

    Interesting written, it's a series of quotes. I've read quite a few books about Zep and its members, notably Page and Plant. All the usual stuff is in this book: Page being wankered and having to be wheeled about on a trolley, Peter Grant's son being a little shit and causing the "Oakland Incident", teenage groupies and the utter vanity and folly of Swan Song Records.

    What I hadn't known, though, is that John Bonham was an utter c**t. Sure, I'd read that he was a pain when drunk/high, but not that this horribleness was there at all times.

    Peter Grant, their manager, was a big chap, and used his size to intimidate people. Yet he gave away a Rolls Royce, and was capable of other incredible kindness. Yet Bonzo (Bonham) appears to have been just a bastard.

    Plant could be an arrsehole as well, he and Page butted heads on a regular basis. Page was like an earlier day Axl Rose, or a latter day Mick Jagger: total control. Except Page was wasted most of the time, and never really got what he wanted.

    The only sensible one seems to have been John Paul Jones (real name John Baldwin). One hell of a musician, he stayed away from the other three (or four, if you include Grant) whenever he could.

    Grant would start contract negotiations by putting a pound of cocaine on the table. "Let's get through this lot and see how we go" One promoter reported three days on the Marching Powder before Grant would let him go home.

    Dunno if it's still true, but as of 2012 there was a standing offer of $300 million for the remaining members of Zep to tour again. Mind bending.
I read somewhere that Grant would have a lackey follow Bonham around with a suitcase full of cash to pay people off for assaults, criminal damage etc. He was that full of random mayhem.
JP Jones came close to quitting a few times due to the behaviour of the others.
 
Vintage Stuff by Tom Sharpe. I haven't read any Tom Sharpe for ages and had forgotten how clever and truly funny his writing is. I will now search out inter alia Wilt, Blott on the Landscape and Porterhouse Blue. Incidentally the latter two were great TV adaptations as well.
 
Recently skipped through:
“The Year of Living Biblically” by AJ Jacobs. Found in a charity shop.
Jacobs is an editor for Esquire magazine, and secular Jewish. He decides to live a year living by the Bible’s commandments. Of which there are a lot, depending on the version you observe. He does the first 7 to 8 months as per the Old Testament, then the other bit as per the New Testament. It’s day by day, so you could pick it up and drop it.
The book is actually quite amusing in places. Jacobs uses lots of guidance from Jews and Christians to help him. One of the surprises for me was the amount of Biblical translations/interpretations and commentaries. Spoiler alert: there are a lot, and no one agrees with the other.
Coming from a journalistic background, he tries to cover a lot. The section on serpent handling was interesting. Jacobs is ultimately a liberal city-dweller and you will have to read it for the full story.
If you see it in a charity shop, worth picking up.
 
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Vintage Stuff by Tom Sharpe. I haven't read any Tom Sharpe for ages and had forgotten how clever and truly funny his writing is. I will now search out inter alia Wilt, Blott on the Landscape and Porterhouse Blue. Incidentally the latter two were great TV adaptations as well.
I particularly enjoyed "The Throwback". Though "Rioutous Assembly" and "Indecent Exposure" had some memorable characters, notably "Constable Els". :)

Must re-read them.
 
“The Anatomy School” by Bernard MacLaverty.
Random pickup from Hampshire Libraries. The narrator, Martin, is at a Catholic Grammar School in Belfast in the late 1960s. Doing re-sits as he flunked the last year of school. His friend is the world-wise Kavanagh and they are joined by a new lad who is a bit subversive.
It starts with Martin being taken by the school on a retreat with enforced silence to open talk and questioning. Some of the scenes where Martin is the observer on his mother’s evenings with friends and the local priest are very good, and very funny.
Full of daft schoolboy humour. Worth a try. Would read more MacLaverty.
 
Another one:
”Chasing the Dram: Finding the Spirit of Whisky” by Rachel McCormack.
McCormack is from Glasgow, and has lived in Spain for years. She writes and broadcasts on food and drink.
The book is about travelling around Scotland, drinking whisky, and doing some cooking with it. Simple premise, simple book.
I learnt quite a bit from it. McCormack is good at telling a story in an engaging, amusing way, and some parts are very funny. She also encourages the reader to use whisky in cooking, for example suggesting its addition to broth.
And whisky as an accompaniment to chips.
 

Mrsheeny

War Hero
Just read ‘The Fear Bubble’ by Ant Middleton. Enjoyed it, I quite like getting into his mind. The fear bubble technique is one I wish I’d knew when I was 16, would have saved me pebble dashing every toilet in the North West before every rugby game I ever played :)
 

jg505

Old-Salt
Vintage Stuff by Tom Sharpe. I haven't read any Tom Sharpe for ages and had forgotten how clever and truly funny his writing is. I will now search out inter alia Wilt, Blott on the Landscape and Porterhouse Blue. Incidentally the latter two were great TV adaptations as well.
I remember reading Tom Sharpe novels nearly 30 years ago and still remember the embarrassment of actually laughing out loud whilst reading his books, pure brilliance.

I'm a huge Clive Cussler fan, been reading his stuff for 36 years now, just getting into the Isaac Bell series.
 
Time for a new non-fiction read. From coaching international rugby (Eddie Jones) to this:

View attachment 451133

Synopsis:
At the beginning of the Second World War, Koestler was living in the south of France working on Darkness at Noon. After retreating to Paris he was imprisoned by the French as an undesirable alien even though he had been a respected crusader against fascism. Only luck and his passionate energy allowed him to escape the fate of many of the innocent refugees, who were handed over to the Nazis for torture and often execution. Scum of the Earth is more than the story of Koestler's survival. His shrewd observation of the collapse of French determination to resist during the summer of 1940 is an illustration of what happens when a nation loses its honour and its pride.
This has just been mentioned in the book I'm reading about the escape routes.
 
I've read the first five books in the Chronicles of St. Mary's and I must say they're a pretty good read. The latest in the Rivers of London series - False Value, dropped into my Kindle this morning so reading that now.
 

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