What are you reading right now?

That appears to be part of a series of thirteen books: "Consisting of 13 books written across 26 years, the adventure-filled epic Fortunes of France is one of France's best-loved historical fiction series. Never before published in English, book one, The Brethren, makes its debut in the US in the spring of 2015..."
I thought there were a couple of sequels, not that many!
ETA: only the first four have been translated into English so far.
 
Last edited:
That appears to be part of a series of thirteen books: "Consisting of 13 books written across 26 years, the adventure-filled epic Fortunes of France is one of France's best-loved historical fiction series. Never before published in English, book one, The Brethren, makes its debut in the US in the spring of 2015..."
I shall probably go for it in the original. Thanks.
 
That appears to be part of a series of thirteen books: "Consisting of 13 books written across 26 years, the adventure-filled epic Fortunes of France is one of France's best-loved historical fiction series. Never before published in English, book one, The Brethren, makes its debut in the US in the spring of 2015..."
b-ok.org has the 4 English ones you note.
Amazon Schmamazon!
 
I shall probably go for it in the original. Thanks.
Could be interesting. My French is merde, so I will have to wait for the translator to get to work with the remaining nine. Within the first book, there is mention made that the local langue d’oc is used by the family and one of the retainers is a Gascon. The narrator, Pierre, complains of having French lessons! The author was himself a linguist and attached to the BEF as an interpreter in 1940, but I think he wrote the series in French.
Whatever, enjoy. I found the first book a great read.
 

Karamoja

Old-Salt
The Third Man didn't take long (four nights) and it left me feeling as though I had missed something. I seem to remember 'doing' Greene's The Power and the Glory at school, which may have left me with a bias.

Anyhow, tonight it's back to something I know:

View attachment 444445

No synopsis needed I'm sure.
I jumped into the series with Prague Fatale, really enjoyed it so decided to read the rest in chronological order and have just finished Metropolis. Again, a good read and I had no idea that Berlin was, in the 30s, such a swinging/decadent city. A real shame that the author is no longer with us.
 
You might try the new German TV series *Berlin Babylon*. Includes this lass getting her kit off:

 
13332446.jpg

Hugely disappointing, hardly any of the book covers the actual siege and is mostly made up of filler.
 
I jumped into the series with Prague Fatale, really enjoyed it so decided to read the rest in chronological order and have just finished Metropolis. Again, a good read and I had no idea that Berlin was, in the 30s, such a swinging/decadent city. A real shame that the author is no longer with us.
Actually during the 20s, the decade of instability between monarchy and dictatorship, that of the Weimar Republic. Aware that any moment it could all go terribly wrong (as it did in 1929) the Berliners "danced on the volcano" in the hedonistic manner shown in Cabaret or Babylon Berlin.

In the 30s, the National Socialists were forcing a straitjacket of dour conformity on everyone.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Doing a steady march through John le Carré's output for bedtime reading, it usually takes two or three pages before I roll over and crush my glasses, but sometimes the content is annoying and another page or two is necessary. Quote (from A Small Town in Germany):

I don't know what le Carré was on when he wrote that, but I'd like to try some of it.
I read The Constant Gardener a few years ago and enjoyed it from start to finish. I must admit to giving up on one or two of his other books, the titles of which I can’t remember, he does go off on one at times.

Edited.
I‘m 3/4 of the way through my second book of the Dexter series of books by Jeff Lyndsey. It’s better than the first and so funny and gruesome at the same time, I have the full series of books and the only complaint is that it keeps me awake far too late into the night.
I got them on Amazon but it won’t let me copy and paste, Would make a great holiday/travelling read as well as a bedtime read, if you liked the tv series you will love these books.
 
Last edited:

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Map of Africa by [Nugent, Eddy]
Just been re-reading these; I had forgotten how funny and true to life they are. Well done fellas !
 
I haven't read a book in ages, but Peter Hitchens has a suggestion which may interest some. I found it by way of a retweet by Andrew Neil.

1579655689113.png


What would Orwell have made of Trump?
More attention should be paid to his collected essays, letters and journalism
Peter Hitchens

I didn't know that Donald had a collection of essays, letters and journalism, so this was going to be interesting. Would Eric Arthur Blair have troubled himself to read his tweets? Anyway, back to Peter's article. He quotes from one of Orwell's essays:

And then there is this superbly modern summary of the appeal of such things:

‘The average man is not directly interested in politics, and when he reads, he wants the current struggles of the world to be translated into a simple story about individuals…people worship power in the form in which they are able to understand it.’

Hitchen's then reflects that:

For President Trump has the cynical brilliance of a popular author, a crude and even ugly style, but the overpowering ability to tell a story in a form in which his desired audience can understand it.

Indeed, whatever our thoughts on DJT's way with words, he is a communicator who can connect with his audience. That was Hitchen's hook to get the readers attention but the real purpose is to encourage us to look beyond Animal Farm to the essays and other works of George Orwell/ Eric Arthur Blair.

What would Orwell have made of Trump? | Spectator USA
 

Attachments

Still reading The Seven (idiot not three,) pillars, point of interest was hit around ch 64 when Lawrence reflects on Christianity as a Jewish sect and uses the word "Gadarene". Now the last time I saw that word it was used as a chapter title in a book about Idi Amin- (de Gadarene Storm) and thought it was a play on words( then). Also started reading "Marine A" bought for me for Christmas. Have to say I am not totally convinced at the moment and so far it is mitigation-we'll see.
 
Last edited:
 

Latest Threads

Top