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Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I found “For Whom the Bell Tolls” unreadable. One of the few books I have abandoned. Lots of his other stuff is great, including “A Farewell to Arms”.
I think it will be a long time before I pick up another one of his books.
 
The only Hemingway I have ever read through was 'The Old Man and The Sea', and only because that was the only book in English in the jail in Havana. I probably read it 8 times and have hated it ever since. His writing style is very odd, punctuation seems to be applied as an afterthought - when it is applied - and the author is very sel-indulgent. I can only assume that he attained his literary icon status as either a joke or by an application of the Eperor's New Clothes syndrome.
I went to a film of this tale. It was unique, in the manner it was drawn on glass plates and subsequently 'stop' photography filmed.

In truth, I was more fascinated with the stop motion technology than the story. Didn't Spencer Tracy undertake this tale on film?
 
Just finished Agent Running In The Field, John le Carré’s latest spyfest.

Maybe not a return to the Smiley days but a great modern spy thriller. A few continuity errors and a few gaps to fill in (“How did that happen then?”) but excellent nonetheless.

For the faint hearted he is not a big fan of Brexit. Or Trump. And much of the plot revolves around the former.

Plenty of positive reviews online. If you like le Carré you will like this.

Once again he has demonstrated that he is not just a great spy writer but a great writer full stop.
Dear me, have you read The Naive And Sentimental Lover? Don't! Seriously, don't.
 
Much as the 'Islington' set raved about Salman Rushdie. Or, James Joyce and 'Ulysses'
As a Catholic boy, 'Stephen D' was a start and 'Portrait of the artist as a young man' was my intro to Joyce. In truth for the early '60's these books were the heights of good literature.
 
I read a lot, and I mean a lot, of Moorcock when I was at university (more years ago than I care to remember). I had been brought up on Robert Heinlein and John Wyndham (a favourite of my father) who were obviously pre -New Wave (ie pre 1967/8) but Moorcock opened my eyes to a different world out there. Or, in his case, a "multiverse" out there with his blend of Science Fantasy and Fiction.

I liked the first Peter Hamilton books and also some of Gemmel, as Grim Squeaker mentions, but I would suggest that Gemmel is rather more Sci Fantasy than Sci Fiction.

Anyway, after thirty odd years, I'm still reading Sci-Fi and have just finished Thin Air by Richard Morgan. We've mentioned this in the dystopian thread with regards to the Kovacs trilogy and Market Forces by the same author. I was a bit disappointed with Thin Air. Some good constructs and environment building with regards to Martian colonisation and political corruption but it was one of those books that at the 2/3 point I was wishing that there was some indication that we were getting to the end. A lot more graphic violence than is usual in the Morgan books and some gratuitous/unnecessary sex scenes that reminded me of those badly written readers' letters in 1980s Penthouse magazine. Not one of his best but if you like a bit of Chandleresque wisecracking mixed in with frontier Martian politics and violence, it passes the time.
I abandoned it within 20 pages. It was dire. Written for the film option, not his fans. Mr Morgan is now consigned to the Alexander money grubbing, any old shyte will do, McCall fcek the readers Smith club in my opinion.

And breathe....
 
U P D A T E

An Orc On The Wild Side, Tom Holt

Good news: the doughnut appears on page 86.

Phew! I was worried he'd lost his way for a bit and the longest running plot device/gag in the history of English "lit" had been abandoned.

Huzzah! Jaffa cakes all round, chaps!
 
I went to a film of this tale. It was unique, in the manner it was drawn on glass plates and subsequently 'stop' photography filmed.

In truth, I was more fascinated with the stop motion technology than the story. Didn't Spencer Tracy undertake this tale on film?
Sure did.
 
"Jungle Soldier" the true story Freddy Spencer Chapman by Brian Moynahan quite a story to put it mildly
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I went to a film of this tale. It was unique, in the manner it was drawn on glass plates and subsequently 'stop' photography filmed.

In truth, I was more fascinated with the stop motion technology than the story. Didn't Spencer Tracy undertake this tale on film?
Yep, that's the feeler. Excellent actor and the film wasn't too bad. Very low key cast though
 
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Just arrived in the post today, in beautiful hardback format. If you served in BAOR, this is a must!
Initial impressions are very good.
 
I have just finished and thoroughly enjoyed The Girl who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson, the second of the Millennium trilogy. I was interested to discover that a David Lagercrantz has written three more books in what is now the Millennium series.

Anyway, I have started the next in Christopher G. Moore's Vincent Calvino series:

the-marriage-tree.jpg


Synopsis:
It’s okay for Thais to believe in ghosts—it’s their birthright. But why is Vincent Calvino seeing ghosts, and why are they so angry? Calvino is haunted by a series of deaths in Rangoon and Bangkok, when he stumbles onto a new murder case - but is it a new case, or an old one returned from the dead? A murder investigation leads Calvino inside an underworld network smuggling Rohingya out of illegal camps and detention centres. Calvino looks for the killer in the mystical Thai world of sword and marriage trees.
 
Birdsong, by Sebastian Faulks. Others on here have slated it but I found it interesting and thought provoking.
Previously I read I am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes, to which I keep returning, along with Red Sparrow by Jason Matthews.
 
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Autumn, 1541. King Henry VIII has set out on a spectacular Progress to the North to attend an extravagant submission of his rebellious subjects in York.
Already in the city are lawyer Matthew Shardlake and his assistant Jack Barak. As well as assisting with legal work processing petitions to the King, Shardlake has reluctantly undertaken a special mission for the Archbishop Cranmer – to ensure the welfare of an important but dangerous conspirator being returned to London for interrogation.
But the murder of a local glazier involves Shardlake in deeper mysteries, connected not only to the prisoner in York Castle but to the royal family itself. And when Shardlake and Barak stumble upon a cache of secret papers which could threaten the Tudor throne, a chain of events unfolds that will lead to Shardlake facing the most terrifying fate of the age

Currently my favourite historical author
 
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'THE BIG SHOW is as close as you'll ever get to fighting for your life from the cockpit of a Spitfire or Typhoon. Perhaps the most viscerally exciting book ever written by a fighter pilot.' Rowland White

Pierre Clostermann DFC was one of the oustanding Allied aces of the Second World War. A Frenchman who flew with the RAF, he survived over 420 operational sorties, shooting down scores of enemy aircraft while friends and comrades lost their lives in the deadly skies above Europe

Very good
 
The hire agreement between us & a client to see who pays for some very expensive kit to be returned to us.
They say 3 people needed we say 1, seems Sales did not get the client to sign a trial agreement so we fit the bill.
This is more boring than going through a Complete ET holding!
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Just finished after rattling through it.KJ Parker, 16 ways to defend a walled city.
Really good.
 

MrMemory

War Hero
The only Hemingway I have ever read through was 'The Old Man and The Sea', and only because that was the only book in English in the jail in Havana. I probably read it 8 times and have hated it ever since. His writing style is very odd, punctuation seems to be applied as an afterthought - when it is applied - and the author is very sel-indulgent. I can only assume that he attained his literary icon status as either a joke or by an application of the Eperor's New Clothes syndrome.
Do tell us more about your adventures in a Cuban jail. What was it like and what were you in for?


MM
 
Have picked up The Places in Between by Rory Stewart in a local charity shop, it's a cracking read.
Also I have on the go 'Cruel crossing' by Edward Stourton about the Comet escape route over the Pyrenees a walk thats on my bucket list.
 
The Night Fire, Michael Connelly.

The latest in the Bosch series, well actually the latest in what now appears to be the Bosch Ballard series. Harry and Renee share a case, or two putting the bad men down and setting the world to rights. Harry is definitely ageing, as we all do, and is starting to show signs of mortality - I am hoping he will be around for a few more books yet before the baton is handed over firmly to Ballard.

I like the Bosch character so he always gets a 5 out of 5 from me.
 

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