What are you reading right now?

Surprised at being alive.
Robert Curtis


Chap flew CH-47s in Vietnam, then later joined National Guard, later was with the USMC on Sea Knights, and later with Royal Navy (I haven't got to that bit yet)
Cracking yarn a la Chickenhawk.

Very enjoyable and informative read.

 
Re-read Rowland White's 'Phoenix Squadron (2009) which has been mentioned, mostly rather briefly, several times on ARRSE since it came out.

The story of how the 'old' Ark Royal (the pukka carrier which I visited when she first came to Guzz), diverted from mid-Atlantic, drove flat out for two days to a position between Bermuda and the Bahamas to launch two Buccaneers on a six-hour round trip to 'show the flag' over Belize City, and in so doing deterred a Guatemalan land grab in January 1972, when carrier-borne air power with its global reach was the only thing that the UK could bring to bear on the situation.

An important story which explains how Guatemala nursed exactly the same sort of delusional ideas about Belize as the Argentinians exhibited regarding the Falklands. It also describes the operation of Ark in fine grain detail and in that way is a text book of how she could simultaneously provide Combat Air Patrol, a rippled ASW screen, Airborne Early Warning and on top of all that a massive offensive effect. No end consultation with bods and records research etc to back it all up. Very well told so that the reader is up there in the aircraft watching the dials.

Personal interest for me as I had been shipmates with many of the participants and the schoolmate of one of them, and had been in Lossie when the first Buc squadron (Buc 1s) with their ginormous scantlings was forming up, even got to sit in one briefly; but a very, very ARRSE-worthy book in its own right.
I bought a copy from a charity shop and will be reading it in the near future.
 
Surprised at being alive.
Robert Curtis


Chap flew CH-47s in Vietnam, then later joined National Guard, later was with the USMC on Sea Knights, and later with Royal Navy (I haven't got to that bit yet)
Cracking yarn a la Chickenhawk.

Very enjoyable and informative read.

Downloaded
 
I finished 'To Play the King' by Michael Dobbs last night. The sequel to 'House of Cards', I recommend it. It seemed quite an apt book to be reading at the moment, given all the constitutional goings-on.

I immediately launched into this:

fools-river.jpg


Synopsis:
The eighth installment in Timothy Hallinan's Edgar Award–nominated ticking-clock thriller about the most dangerous facets of Bangkok's seedy underbelly.
The two most difficult days in Bangkok writer Poke Rafferty’s life begin with an emergency visit from Edward Dell, the almost-boyfriend of Poke’s teenage daughter, Miaow. The boy’s father, Buddy, a late-middle-aged womanizer who has moved to Bangkok for happy hunting, has disappeared, and money is being siphoned out of his bank and credit card accounts.
It soon becomes apparent that Buddy is in the hands of a pair of killers who prey on Bangkok’s “sexpats”; when his accounts are empty, he’ll be found, like a dozen others before him, floating face down in a Bangkok canal with a weighted cast on his unbroken leg. His money is almost gone.
Over forty-eight frantic hours, Poke does everything he can to locate Buddy before it’s too late.
 
Stolen, Grace Blakeley


Robinson Crusoe, Daniel Defoe

Battle Scars, Jason Fox



Fighting monsters, Jim Matthews

 

Ciggie

GCM
Just finished Callsign Hades by Paddy Bury. I've no doubt this excellent work has already been praised to the skies on here. One of the best personal accounts of conflict I have ever read, and I'm very hard to please. If you're on here, Capt., I take my hat off to you and really hope you use your undoubted literary skills again and again for the benefit of all who can read ! You have a talent Sir! I'll be plugging that for you as long as I breathe. ( Oh, one small bad..I bought my copy second hand for 2 Euros ;) ).
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Reading another Bernard Cornwell book this one The Winter King.
The first in a series of books on King Arthur and Merlin.
Takes some getting into but I’ve persevered and once again thanks to his descriptive writing Cornwell brings the legend of Arthur and Merlin to life.
It’s an old book but I have the second book on the shelf and will be reading that once I’ve finished this.
Merlin ran a funny household, a horrible violent dwarf installing fear amongst the workers.
If you like the legend of Arthur and fancy a bit of fiction then yes I recommend it.
 

Ciggie

GCM
Reading another Bernard Cornwell book this one The Winter King.
The first in a series of books on King Arthur and Merlin.
Takes some getting into but I’ve persevered and once again thanks to his descriptive writing Cornwell brings the legend of Arthur and Merlin to life.
It’s an old book but I have the second book on the shelf and will be reading that once I’ve finished this.
Merlin ran a funny household, a horrible violent dwarf installing fear amongst the workers.
If you like the legend of Arthur and fancy a bit of fiction then yes I recommend it.
Cornwell is bloody excellent!
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Re-read an old favourite, John Winton's 'HMS Leviathan'. This copy is a 1967 first edition, not visible anywhere on the net today, but has £2 pencilled inside the front cover. Mentioned in various ways elsewhere on ARRSE.

Allegedly based on the teething of HMS Eagle in the early fifties (JW served in her at Suez. The hangar fire episode in the book is what would have happened had such a thing really caught hold in 1956 when he was in her, which if not timely contained would have scuppered the Suez expedition). Mercifully I never served in a big carrier but the whole story has a hideous ring of truth to it. My gut feel is that this book was first written in the fifties and I suspect was placed on ice, possibly by invitation. Various naval matters from the early sixties are blended into the narrative where JW has an absolutely perfect feel for wardroom issues, and some RN ones which are still with us sixty years later (see ARRSE RN forum!). The detail is superb in this picture of how a very big ship runs in all her departments, and how to (or not to) run her.

The core of the book is the disconnect between those running the ship and the (short service) aviators in the squadrons, who see the ship as an hotel and garage to which they have no responsibility. JW paints them as ill-mannered, ill-disciplined oiks.

Flashes of JW's very sharp humour here and there within a very serious story.

I think very ARRSE-worthy, even for landlubbers, in its treatment of leadership beneath the technical detail.
 
Re-read an old favourite, John Winton's 'HMS Leviathan'. This copy is a 1967 first edition, not visible anywhere on the net today, but has £2 pencilled inside the front cover. Mentioned in various ways elsewhere on ARRSE.

Allegedly based on the teething of HMS Eagle in the early fifties (JW served in her at Suez. The hangar fire episode in the book is what would have happened had such a thing really caught hold in 1956 when he was in her, which if not timely contained would have scuppered the Suez expedition). Mercifully I never served in a big carrier but the whole story has a hideous ring of truth to it. My gut feel is that this book was first written in the fifties and I suspect was placed on ice, possibly by invitation. Various naval matters from the early sixties are blended into the narrative where JW has an absolutely perfect feel for wardroom issues, and some RN ones which are still with us sixty years later (see ARRSE RN forum!). The detail is superb in this picture of how a very big ship runs in all her departments, and how to (or not to) run her.

The core of the book is the disconnect between those running the ship and the (short service) aviators in the squadrons, who see the ship as an hotel and garage to which they have no responsibility. JW paints them as ill-mannered, ill-disciplined oiks.

Flashes of JW's very sharp humour here and there within a very serious story.

I think very ARRSE-worthy, even for landlubbers, in its treatment of leadership beneath the technical detail.
I see a fair amount of his stuff on b-ok.
Thank you.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
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Just started this and it is excellent. Full of charm and modest wit. I didn't realise that he had been in the Royal Artillery then commissioned into the DLI during the war.
Highly recommended.
 
Rogue Male by Geoffrey Household. Written around 80 years ago but very gripping. Inspired David Morrell's First Blood, Forsyth's Day of the Jackal among others according to the new introduction.
Just finished Rogue Male. Household also wrote a sequel, Rogue Justice, and the original book also seems to have inspired Testament by David Morrell. His First Blood is very different from the films.
 
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Not a bad read about the cop who shone a light on the corruption in the NYPD and the indifference he met from his superiors, the only thing that spoiled it for me is the way the author fawns over him,rather nauseating in parts.
 

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