What are you reading right now?

Thanks for the info, much appreciated. These sort of to-the-point autobiographies are gold dust.
Richard Pool's book is quite sad. I won't spoil it, instead I'll just say that it's one of those cases where it later emerged that a Dutch Submarine could have taken them off at a key juncture and instead, well, as with all wars, good people died needlessly.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Just finished all 8 books in Derek Robinson's RFC/RAF collection. "Piece of Cake" is by far the best of his book, IMO, with Goshawk Squadron being the one I disliked the most. It was nice to trace the career of Skull Skelton from PoC through "Damned Good Show" then "A Good Clean Fight" and ending with "Hello Russia, Goodbye England" in the 1960s.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
As a follow on to No Escape Zone (post #9443 above), re-reading 'Joint Force Harrier' by Ade Orchard which I first mentioned in 2012 in
https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/what-are-you-reading-right-now.15683/page-167#post-4597553, post #3321.

Still a good read and ARRSEworthy but not quite as gripping as NEZ. What had changed? from 801 with it super-versatile SHARs, the SHAR had gone and 800 were down to mud-moving with the GR7, and the Fleet Air Arm had completely lost its air defence capability. As to Afghanistan, those closer to it can tell me if any of it that was so expensively 'recovered' from the Taliban is still free?

My grandmother told me that her father (RHA) had 'marched with Kitchener from Kabul to Kandahar' but I have never been able to validate that. That was Afghan War failure #2. One of his sons lost an arm in Waziristan in 1919 in failure #3. This is about failure #4, as I see it, but I am open to correction.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Unusually, two fails.

Two Fifties Penguins that I tried re-reading:

'Guys and Dolls', a twenty-item anthology of Damon Runyon short stories. About three pages in I realised that the whole tone of DR no longer works for me at all, it was just uphill reading his stuff and nowadays I could not care less about his characters.

'Brave New World', Aldous Huxley. 1932 sci-fi where babies are manufactured artificially to order in different intellectual sized from Alpha down to Epsilon, and everybody just F's for fun. This doesn't work for me either in a world of IVF, surrogacy and sperm donation where already thousands of people are being condemned to a life of not knowing who they are. The idea of a world governed buy a self-perpetuating dictatorship with peer-group thought control rather jars too.

So both to a charity shop. They are both classics now so maybe somebody less jaundiced will enjoy them.
 

skeetstar

Old-Salt
Just finished 'Tommy' by Richard Holmes.
Starts with a description of a Trench raid, and the second half is very readable, when it talks more about the actual fighting. There is a bit too much about chain of command, and other topics that didn't really interest me, but the last third is un put downable.. back to individual soldiers experiences.

One thing that struck me ( I may have misread it though) was the widespread use of gas shells from 1915 onwards, just to degrade the efficiency of the enemy. It appeared that counter battery fire routinely used gas, as the German respirators could be used for only so long, after that the artillery men had to get away, find new kit, or re locate.

Never realised gas was so prevalent.
 

Awol

LE
Just finished 'Tommy' by Richard Holmes.
Starts with a description of a Trench raid, and the second half is very readable, when it talks more about the actual fighting. There is a bit too much about chain of command, and other topics that didn't really interest me, but the last third is un put downable.. back to individual soldiers experiences.

One thing that struck me ( I may have misread it though) was the widespread use of gas shells from 1915 onwards, just to degrade the efficiency of the enemy. It appeared that counter battery fire routinely used gas, as the German respirators could be used for only so long, after that the artillery men had to get away, find new kit, or re locate.

Never realised gas was so prevalent.
Gas was used in a simple, but genius way. Gas lobbed into the enemy's trenches meant that soldiers had to keep waking up to don their gas masks; after a few days they were totally knackered and that much easier to beat.
 
I finished Christopher G. Moore's Lost in Rangoon last night. Tonight I start:

46b7f1e4bb255a451a1fde430c8855f3.jpg


Synopsis:
"Right at the end of the war, some Nazis saw it coming. They knew that even if they escaped, hundreds of others wouldn't. They needed to set up routes, channels, ways out for their friends. Ratlines."

Ireland, 1963. As the Irish people prepare to welcome President John F. Kennedy to the land of his ancestors, a German businessman is murdered in a seaside guesthouse. He is the third foreign national to die within a few days, and Minister for Justice Charles Haughey is desperate to protect a shameful secret: the dead men were all former Nazis granted asylum by the Irish government.

A note from the killers is found on the corpse, addressed to Colonel Otto Skorzeny, Hitler's favourite commando. It says simply: 'We are coming for you. Await our call.'

Lieutenant Albert Ryan, Directorate of Intelligence, is ordered to investigate the murders and protect Skorzeny. But as he infiltrates Ireland's secret network of former Nazis and collaborators, Ryan must make a terrible choice: his country or his conscience?


Interestingly, in Neville's trilogy set in Northern Ireland, the main character, an RUC officer is a catholic and in this book the main character, a Gardai officer is a Protestant.

We'll see how it goes.
 
I finished Christopher G. Moore's Lost in Rangoon last night. Tonight I start:

View attachment 412695

Synopsis:
"Right at the end of the war, some Nazis saw it coming. They knew that even if they escaped, hundreds of others wouldn't. They needed to set up routes, channels, ways out for their friends. Ratlines."

Ireland, 1963. As the Irish people prepare to welcome President John F. Kennedy to the land of his ancestors, a German businessman is murdered in a seaside guesthouse. He is the third foreign national to die within a few days, and Minister for Justice Charles Haughey is desperate to protect a shameful secret: the dead men were all former Nazis granted asylum by the Irish government.

A note from the killers is found on the corpse, addressed to Colonel Otto Skorzeny, Hitler's favourite commando. It says simply: 'We are coming for you. Await our call.'

Lieutenant Albert Ryan, Directorate of Intelligence, is ordered to investigate the murders and protect Skorzeny. But as he infiltrates Ireland's secret network of former Nazis and collaborators, Ryan must make a terrible choice: his country or his conscience?


Interestingly, in Neville's trilogy set in Northern Ireland, the main character, an RUC officer is a catholic and in this book the main character, a Gardai officer is a Protestant.

We'll see how it goes.
I'm looking forward to your view on it.
 
Interestingly, in Neville's trilogy set in Northern Ireland, the main character, an RUC officer is a catholic and in this book the main character, a Gardai officer is a Protestant.
The former case is possible but perhaps a touch cliched in fictional literature. The latter case is unlikely to the point of virtual impossiblity if what I have been told is true. I'd be interested in the input of @Gary Cooper , @Aul_Wan or @irlsgt ?
 
I finished Christopher G. Moore's Lost in Rangoon last night. Tonight I start:

View attachment 412695

Synopsis:
"Right at the end of the war, some Nazis saw it coming. They knew that even if they escaped, hundreds of others wouldn't. They needed to set up routes, channels, ways out for their friends. Ratlines."

Ireland, 1963. As the Irish people prepare to welcome President John F. Kennedy to the land of his ancestors, a German businessman is murdered in a seaside guesthouse. He is the third foreign national to die within a few days, and Minister for Justice Charles Haughey is desperate to protect a shameful secret: the dead men were all former Nazis granted asylum by the Irish government.

A note from the killers is found on the corpse, addressed to Colonel Otto Skorzeny, Hitler's favourite commando. It says simply: 'We are coming for you. Await our call.'

Lieutenant Albert Ryan, Directorate of Intelligence, is ordered to investigate the murders and protect Skorzeny. But as he infiltrates Ireland's secret network of former Nazis and collaborators, Ryan must make a terrible choice: his country or his conscience?


Interestingly, in Neville's trilogy set in Northern Ireland, the main character, an RUC officer is a catholic and in this book the main character, a Gardai officer is a Protestant.

We'll see how it goes.
I literately finished this today, without spoilers Otto is pivotal to the plot, Albert comes across as Darragh O’Malley in strength guile and guts
Am sure the Casino royale torture scene is very close to this, call it a homage to tactical questioning
 

cowgoesmoo

Old-Salt
One thing that struck me ( I may have misread it though) was the widespread use of gas shells from 1915 onwards, just to degrade the efficiency of the enemy. It appeared that counter battery fire routinely used gas, as the German respirators could be used for only so long, after that the artillery men had to get away, find new kit, or re locate.

Never realised gas was so prevalent.
I only realised it after I read Paxmans A Higher Form of Killing a couple of years ago - can't remember the exact figure but something ridiculous like 80% of all artillery shells fired in WW1 contained CWs
 
22:30-22.Aug.19
Not reading anything right now but......
Saw a reference to a book posted some hours earlier. Which thread or poster I have no idea. Synopsis being "What would be the UKs reaction too nuclear war between 1945 and 2010 be". Something about " In the event of lost comms, tune into Radio 4. If no Archers or (some other cheery middle England show) open PM s orders and follow".
A classic case of "I'll know the title when I see it". Any pointers in the right direction, greatfully received.

SK
 

Latest Threads

Top