What are you reading right now?

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Have you tried Azincourtby Cornwell? (Spelt his name right this time).
That is a cracking story very well told and gripping from the off.
I’m sure you’ll like it.

View attachment 402902
I can only give you one like for this. It's a brilliant book. If you like it, try 1356 which is similar. It's part of the 'Grail Quest ' pantheon and again, all about archers.
His more modern novels - as set in more modern times - such as 'Crackdown' 'Wildtrack' and 'Sea Lord' are very good and much, much better than Jack Higgins output.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I can only give you one like for this. It's a brilliant book. If you like it, try 1356 which is similar. It's part of the 'Grail Quest ' pantheon and again, all about archers.
His more modern novels - as set in more modern times - such as 'Crackdown' 'Wildtrack' and 'Sea Lord' are very good and much, much better than Jack Higgins output.
Thanks I’ll keep an eye out.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Ok there have been a few posts on B Cornwell so I thought I’d put this here,
I’ve had a quick look and it seems to be a very informative web site.

Bernard Cornwell
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
I can only give you one like for this. It's a brilliant book. If you like it, try 1356 which is similar. It's part of the 'Grail Quest ' pantheon and again, all about archers.
His more modern novels - as set in more modern times - such as 'Crackdown' 'Wildtrack' and 'Sea Lord' are very good and much, much better than Jack Higgins output.
I have read all of Mick Herron's series of an MI5 office for outcasts in some London backwater and he a knack for describing the misfits who people the office and the Boss, Lamb who is much given to farting and smoking,but can lead a team through the maze of intrigue thrown up by the 'enemy' and colleagues in the proper office.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Continuing to work through my stash of late 1950s Penguins which have sat on shelves unread for decades.

Latest is Evelyn Waugh's 'The Ordeal of Gilbert Pinfold' wherein GP. overdoped with drugs and drink, suffers hallucinations on a sea voyage. Spun autobiography at bottom, it's EW sending himself up - rather lavishly. Subtle humour and perfect English as usual with EW.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
A Penguin that has been following me around since I was 18, Stella Gibbons' 'Cold Comfort Farm'. Th heroine goes to stay with and sorts out her rural cousins who are stuck in a sort of cultural time warp out which she kicks them or marries them off into the twentieth century. The irony which SG could not foresee in 1932 is that her Forties are innocent of Hitler and a World War so in a sense, apart from her Thirties life view reminding me of my mother, are a glimpse of what life might have been like if Adolf had been properly shot in WW1.
 
I finished 'Black Out' by John Lawton last night and very good it was. Lots of twists and turns; whenever I thought I had worked it out, a new twist was introduced.

Tonight I start this:

51Fwqjb7m9L.jpg


Synopsis (lifted from Amazon):
As the fifth novel in the series, It's Starting to Rain, opens our lead protagonist, Samuel Tay, is trying to get used to not having a job. Fired from his position as an investigator for Singapore's Criminal Intelligence Division for the sin of being an honest human being ex-cop Samuel Tay is doing his best to get used to having nothing to do, nowhere to go, and no purpose in life. Things change quickly when a shadowy acquaintance from the netherworld of American intelligence recruits the only partially reluctant Tay for a job calling for the skills of a crack investigator. He provisionally joins a team of interesting and battle hardened warriors from the Deep State. Things quickly escalate and soon Tay and his new partners are caught in a web of deceit and conspiracy reaching to the highest levels of the US government. Trying to stay alive and alert while traveling the globe running down the source of their woes plunges Tay into situations and experiences that are unlike those in his previously staid life forcing him to consider the possibility that he may actually be enjoying himself. Jake Needham's writing rolls off smoothly and even though this is a serious novel his trademark sense of humour frequently got out loud chuckles of appreciation from me. Humour is one of the hardest things to get right, too easy to over or under do it, Needham displays a deft hand here. Add in interesting world building, a fast pace, and sympathetic characters and you have some of his most accessible work to date.
 

Whining Civvy

Old-Salt
In case nobody has mentioned it yet, Conn Iggulden is a cracking read. His 'historical' novels should not be taken as actual history and he does play a bit fast and loose with the facts in order to shake complex events into a good storyline, but they are enormously satifying. I've just finished Darien, a fantasy, and it's just as good.
 
A Penguin that has been following me around since I was 18, Stella Gibbons' 'Cold Comfort Farm'. Th heroine goes to stay with and sorts out her rural cousins who are stuck in a sort of cultural time warp out which she kicks them or marries them off into the twentieth century. The irony which SG could not foresee in 1932 is that her Forties are innocent of Hitler and a World War so in a sense, apart from her Thirties life view reminding me of my mother, are a glimpse of what life might have been like if Adolf had been properly shot in WW1.
Aunts Beeb did a tv adaption of this book which for some inexplicable reason sticks in my memory. One of those 'black and white' episodic Sunday features which all the family looked forward to. The actress Rosemary Crutchley (?) was the lead, a doom laden character if ever there was one. I could never regard her in any other role since.

A myriad of comic writers have since endeavoured to copy the genre, though at the time I took it for 'real'. Thanks, that's a good memory.
 
Re-read of Cox's Navy by Tony Booth. It's getting another airing on my frequent coffee stops during a weekend doing the museums in Manchester.

Currently wandering round the Science and Industry Museum. Rather excellent as always, though the hordes of vacuous foreign students on tours of the place are annoying. Snapping selfies with the exhibits without ever actually looking at the displays or what they are. Baffling.

God, I've got old and grumpy.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Re-read of Cox's Navy by Tony Booth. It's getting another airing on my frequent coffee stops during a weekend doing the museums in Manchester.

Currently wandering round the Science and Industry Museum. Rather excellent as always, though the hordes of vacuous foreign students on tours of the place are annoying. Snapping selfies with the exhibits without ever actually looking at the displays or what they are. Baffling.

God, I've got old and grumpy.
I feel your pain. Living in Cambridge this becomes a fact of everyday life.
 

Wooden Wonder

War Hero
The Big Show, by Pierre Clostermann, again. The line-abreast low-level attack on Schwerin by eight Tempests, of which two survived, brings tears to my eyes every time I read it.

And Catch 22, again, just so I can scream at the TV when watching the series.
 
image.jpeg

The definitive account of the battle for Din Bin Foo. An excellent account but I would have liked a bit more information on the aftermath.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
1960 Penguin of 1949 'The Wrong Set' by Angus Wilson. Twelve short stories across 200 pp, each a very imaginative construction. The baddies are always women which says something about the author!
 

Whining Civvy

Old-Salt
Fifty Amazing Stories of The Great War; Odhams Press, London 1936, 758 pp, first edition hardback (complete) in great condition. God forbid that sellers of these gems should ever appreciate their value; primary sources are often the best. A favourite is the account from flyer ('ace') Duncan Grinelle Milne (Wind in the Wires author). DGM returned to England in Spring 1918 after two and half years in a German PoW camp (escaped) and had an interview with the King before going back to France.

Beginning with "A first visit to the trenches" the anthology is a variety of first hand accounts of WWI service life, and dits from the trenches and the sea in several theatres. Plenty of home-based recollections too. It's a valuable insight into WWI fighting experiences with vivid descriptions of people, events and circumstances of the time.

Easier to read than dry military history or revisionist flimflam, and much more interesting. No index, which could have made this book an even better reference.

Amazon SIN B000KBSU2Y
Do you know what, I have a copy of that in my bookshelves and am really quite pleased to see that someone else enjoys and values it as much as I do. Mine has a nasty crease down the centre of the spine but is otherwise in good condition, long may it remain that way.
 
@Whining Civvy Mine was a gift from a thoughtful friend. Glad to see that someone appreciated it too.
 
Not reading but recently got into audiobooks.
Now listening to Stephen King's 'Desperation' and lots more to come.
I particularly like the fact you can listen to it at home and pick it up from the same place when you get into the car and vicky verky.
I've also got into them and the sleep timer is a good thing but I find I have to keep going back to the bits I've missed. I've listened to the Pillars of the earth trilogy which killed a month of commuting and have just started HMS Ulysses
 

New Posts

Top