What are you reading right now?

gorillaguts981

Old-Salt
Just started re-reading 'Hitler's Willing Executioners' by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen. It follows the roots of European anti-Semitism from the middle ages to the de-humanising policies of National Socialism. It's easier to kill them if they're not human. It's surprising how co-operative the regimes were in most occupied countries in getting rid of their jewish neighbours. Hard going in places but very informative. Also just read (again) 'Whicker's War' by Alan Whicker who was i/c a film unit serving through North Africa and Italy. A bit lighter apart from the description of how he took the last recognisable photo of Mussolini before his broken skull collapsed. He got a front seat to history and someone paid him to record it.
 
Read The October Man novella by Ben Aaronovitch. Basically a short version of his first Peter Grant- Rivers of London but set in Germany. No stunning plot twists or anything. I assume it's leading to a crossover story or joint mission between the Folly and the Abteilung KDA.
Just finished the book, and thoroughly enjoyed it. Despite being a well-tried and -proven storyline it had enough different in it to keep my interest to the end. I'm hoping that it does lead to further development.
 
Currently reading The Good Soldier Schweik for some reason. About half way through and don't know what to make of it. Schweik however, does remind me of Sven Hassel's character, Porta.
 
Currently reading The Good Soldier Schweik for some reason. About half way through and don't know what to make of it. Schweik however, does remind me of Sven Hassel's character, Porta.
Same, I found it somewhat enjoyable and worth reading..... though for some reason I couldn't possibly explain why, yet for exactly the same indecipherable reason I couldn't bring myself to love it.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Always a Schweik fan. One has to pik up on the feelings of the Czechs towards their Austrian masters to get under the skin of it but in places it's hilarious. My battered Penguin of Schwiek was bought in 1955.

Re-read 'Men at Arms', the first part of Evelyn Waugh's 'Sword of Honour' trilogy. It takes the hero, someone Waugh wishes he was, from direct entry into the RM as an officer to the return of 1RM from Dakar. Spun autobiography; my stepfather was in the same entry and like others, didn't like Waugh (as a person) at all. Had to be kept as far from the troops as possible. Missing bits include the CO's failed attempt to sack Waugh (for chewing out his sergeant in front of the men) and Waugh buying up all the cigars on board the ship bound for Dakar so that there were none for anybody else. For the real story see 'To the War with Waugh' by John St John.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Ta for the info.
Love Sharpe and Uthred but have struggled with his other stuff.
Have you tried Azincourtby Cornwell? (Spelt his name right this time).
That is a cracking story very well told and gripping from the off.
I’m sure you’ll like it.

5CC6A1B6-AF42-4D39-8A60-54C8B757208A.jpeg
 
Always a Schweik fan. One has to pik up on the feelings of the Czechs towards their Austrian masters to get under the skin of it but in places it's hilarious. My battered Penguin of Schwiek was bought in 1955.

Re-read 'Men at Arms', the first part of Evelyn Waugh's 'Sword of Honour' trilogy. It takes the hero, someone Waugh wishes he was, from direct entry into the RM as an officer to the return of 1RM from Dakar. Spun autobiography; my stepfather was in the same entry and like others, didn't like Waugh (as a person) at all. Had to be kept as far from the troops as possible. Missing bits include the CO's failed attempt to sack Waugh (for chewing out his sergeant in front of the men) and Waugh buying up all the cigars on board the ship bound for Dakar so that there were none for anybody else. For the real story see 'To the War with Waugh' by John St John.
I re-read books a lot. Schweik and Sword of Honour both bear a repeat read (as does War and Peace). Schwiek has to be understood, as seaweed says, in the context of his time. I had it explained to me years ago in a Czech pub that he is a smart simpleton conscripted into the Austro-Hungarian army and spent his time fighting the oppression of his allies, who are the real enemy. A real feeling amongst some Czechs. Schweik carries around his doctor’s report saying he is simple, and uses it at every point. A forerunner of the squaddie on the make from the “Army Game” to Ernie Bilko.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Ta.

It was the American civil war, (Copperhead?) series that I couldn't get through.
Haven’t read any of those. I’ve got the latest Uthred novel and am keeping it for holiday. I’m about three quarters through The Fort now and it’s very good.
The rebels are the Americans and its set in Massachusetts, the British are vastly outnumbered and it is really well written, I like the way he slips in actual letters that were written back in the day, oh and his description of the carnage caused by cannon ball fire, well he’s a master of his art is Bernard.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Ta.

It was the American civil war, (Copperhead?) series that I couldn't get through.
I struggled with his Starbuck series and most of his one of novels like Redcoat. Though, for some reason, I enjoyed Crackdown. Evn though it wasn't really his usual type of offering. It was more like Cornwell writing a Jack Higgins novel.

But without the fact that Higgins wrote it annoying you.
 
Just finished: Beowulf.
I had been looking for a copy for a while and found it in a charity shop. Always wanted a crack at it. Very interesting in lots of ways. The prose rattles along as one might expect from something either written to be spoken, or the spoken word to be taken down. Like a Norse saga.
For one of the very earliest works in English, it is set in Denmark and Sweden. Superb descriptive terms and lots of genealogy (be warned). Short, punchy and meant to be declaimed in a mead-hall.
 

gorillaguts981

Old-Salt
You're not allowed say things like that these days.
“The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it.” George Orwell
We've been fighting for the right to say our truths for 953 years so they can just jolly well do one. Speak up, even if you're wrong.
 
I'm really enjoying this, I just regret reading Riptide first.
Imagine my mistake of reading a little white death first…..If Alfie isn't the type in the TB ward….


I re-read books a lot. Schweik and Sword of Honour both bear a repeat read (as does War and Peace). Schwiek has to be understood, as seaweed says, in the context of his time. I had it explained to me years ago in a Czech pub that he is a smart simpleton conscripted into the Austro-Hungarian army and spent his time fighting the oppression of his allies, who are the real enemy. A real feeling amongst some Czechs. Schweik carries around his doctor’s report saying he is simple, and uses it at every point. A forerunner of the squaddie on the make from the “Army Game” to Ernie Bilko.

Have a gander at
The Red Commissar: Including further adventures of the good soldier Švejk and other stories
 
Not reading but recently got into audiobooks.
Now listening to Stephen King's 'Desperation' and lots more to come.
I particularly like the fact you can listen to it at home and pick it up from the same place when you get into the car and vicky verky.
 
Not reading but recently got into audiobooks.
Now listening to Stephen King's 'Desperation' and lots more to come.
I particularly like the fact you can listen to it at home and pick it up from the same place when you get into the car and vicky verky.
I like audiobooks but I've not listened to one in probably 10 years. Had a lot of history books on my iTunes but a while back they made them single download only, iPad broke and boom. Good for in the car or when you are trying to nod off too.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top