What are you reading right now?

I have hard copies of both of those. 'Dark Rose' I really liked. 'Angel7' was good but a bit different.
Murray Davies is quite a good read too. This one I enjoyed.View attachment 400123

There is another, called 'The Dogs in the Streets' which is about Op Banner, sort of.
Jimmy Sands eh? I'd forgotten all about him.
 
I have just finished the last of the three Inspector Lennon books by Stuart Neville. They are: The Twelve, Collusion and Stolen Souls. They are set mainly in Northern Ireland, after the GFA. They are recommended.

And now for something completely different, back to PDR Lao and Dr Siri Paiboun:

anarchy-and-old-dogs-1.jpg


Synopsis:
When a blind, retired dentist is run down by a logging truck as he crosses the road to post a letter, Dr Siri Paiboun, official and only coroner of Laos, finds himself faced with his most explosive case yet. The dentist's mortal remains aren't nearly as intriguing as the letter in his pocket. Written in invisible ink and encrypted, the letter presents Dr Siri with an irresistible challenge. Enlisting the help of his old friend, Civilai, now a senior member of the Laos politburo; Nurse Dtui ('Fatty'); Phosy, a police officer; and Aunt Bpoo, a transvestite fortune-teller, Dr Siri soon finds himself on the trail of an international plot to overthrow the government of Laos.
 
Guns of Navarone.

Charity shop special, it's priced as 3'6 on the cover, but I've been overcharged as I paid 25p for it.

Obviously written in the days when detailed character development and a straightforward plot was in vogue as opposed to caricatures and a convoluted action packed narrative. Despite seeing the film yonks ago it wiled away a long train journey.
 
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Charts the introduction of the Wild Weasel missions and their development throughout the war mixed with historical background as the war progressed.
If you have an interest in Military Aviation i recommend it.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I thought he was a fictional character.
You may recall that I've commented on this book some years ago. I'd add Peter McAleese had a big 'hand' ( NI speak) in the technical contributions to this tome.
 
Alchemy, The Dark Art and Curious Science of creating Magic in Brands, Business and Life. Rory Sutherland, Vice Chairman, Ogilvy.

I enjoy understanding the forced psychology and mind games played on consumers and people and Mr Sutherland is a master of the art.

If you want to manipulate your customers into feeling good and spending money, or your boss into giving you what you want and making them feel good about it and you can;t be Arrsed to read the book then google Rory Sutherland Ted Talk's.
 
Guns of Navarone.

Charity shop special, it's priced as 3'6 on the cover, but I've been overcharged as I paid 25p for it.

Obviously written in the days when detailed character development and a straightforward plot was in vogue as opposed to caricatures and a convoluted action packed narrative. Despite seeing the film yonks ago it wiled away a long train journey.
I reread it last year enjoying the sheer stamina of Andrea as herculean….in stamina…unlike the sequel that had the biggest copout of airdropped waterproof container underneath the dams water...

First book good made into a war classic
second book mehhhh with a could have been good script by GMF into a even worst mehh film.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor

TamH70

MIA
Just seen on Fantastic Fiction that the first book he wrote but was never published "Somewhere out there" will be released on 4th of July. I'm sure it will be a great read and here's hoping all his other books get re released. Somewhere Out There by Mike Lunnon-Wood
What books of his are you missing? I think I've got all that he published pre-mortem already on Kindle.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
What books of his are you missing? I think I've got all that he published pre-mortem already on Kindle.
I've certainly got most, if not all. The Military Quartet, Dark Rose, Angel 7. Eagerly awaiting this "lost" book.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor

TamH70

MIA

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I have never read or ever seen this book, I have repeatedly tried to find a copy, to no avail, never even actually seen a review of the book, obviously extremely rare.
Yup, I concur. I've spent a couple of hours trying to find it, but it's as elusive as Dolly's virginity.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
On November 19 1941 the 6" cruiser HMAS Sydney was lost with all hands (645 all told) after a fight with the MV Kormoran, a German merchant ship converted to commerce raider. In previous service in the Mediterranean Sydney had sunk the Italian cruiser Bartolemeo Colleoni. This her story, well told by Wes Olson in 'HMAS Sydney in Peace and War' (2016). All the action parts are quite excellently done together with the background of Sydney's building and other service (the Kormoran part is necessarily reconstructed from German survivors' accounts). Lots of very interesting photographs. A much appreciated gift and a first class adventure story, albeit with such a disastrous ending.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I saw that but when you follow the link it quotes several poundlings for what could actually be nothing. No hint of content, no review, no photo of book.
I know that the word gullible has been removed from the dictionary, but still………………………...
 
On November 19 1941 the 6" cruiser HMAS Sydney was lost with all hands (645 all told) after a fight with the MV Kormoran, a German merchant ship converted to commerce raider. In previous service in the Mediterranean Sydney had sunk the Italian cruiser Bartolemeo Colleoni. This her story, well told by Wes Olson in 'HMAS Sydney in Peace and War' (2016). All the action parts are quite excellently done together with the background of Sydney's building and other service (the Kormoran part is necessarily reconstructed from German survivors' accounts). Lots of very interesting photographs. A much appreciated gift and a first class adventure story, albeit with such a disastrous ending.
With the finding of both the Kormoran and Sydney wrecks, the accounts given by the German survivors' has proven accurate. The captain of the Sydney unforgivably allowed his ship to close within a mile of the Cormorant, which in reality was just as heavily armed as the Sydney, and the subsequent ambush was devastating. There are now some excellent books on the demise of the Sydney and a very good one on the search for her remains.
 

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