What are you reading right now?

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Just started The Fort by Bernard Cornwall a novel based on a true story during The American War of Independence, featuring actual real life characters as well as fictional.
When I say just started I mean just that, read the first chapter and I’m glad to say it feels like it’s going to be a damn good read like all his books are.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
View attachment 398948
A nice biographical technique and plenty of photos added to indepth research. Probably done to death on here, this was a buckshee copy written by the same author as The Life Of Senna, now read by a casual observer know-nothing who can't do JH any justice yet. Knowing JH vaguely from clips or the film Rush, and Murray Walker's eulogies covered in Chpt. 8, "1980, Fleetwood Mac, the BBC and all that", it's mostly new to me. But if you thought the likes of Moon, Reed or any of the Hollywood drunks were epic bad lads: read SHUNT probably best on Amazon Kindle, for an education.
I think his life was tragically short but my did he live it to the full having fun all the way.
 

TamH70

MIA
Finished "Pantheocide", the second and last book of Stuart Slade's "The Salvation War" series. Which unfortunately was cancelled before the third book in the proposed trilogy as some horrid Balkan type torrented the first two out of religious mania as the portrayal of Yahweh being as bad as his brother Satan (if not worse) hurt his tender sensibilities. At least that's the story that seems most credible at the moment.

I'd love to cut the horrid Balkan type's heart out with a spoon. As it would hurt more.
 
If you liked The Twelve then you'll like the sequel. It's the exact same book. I'm not saying it's bad, it's just the same. (But without the ghosts.)

Cheers,
Dan.
I thought that The Twelve was the same book as The Ghosts of Belfast. Therefore Collusion should be the sequel. I stuffed it up by reading the sequel to Collusion after The Ghosts, but they stand alone pretty well. I found Collusion pretty hard to put down last night.

Books
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Every now and then I read one of this author's books. I think I may have read them all but I started a long - oh so bloody long - time ago.
Amusing and slightly old-fashioned, but worth aI look. Sort of Agatha Christie as played by Ealing studios.

I suppose I should hace included a link or something here.
 
Last edited:

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
And, whilst scanning the watery book site, found this;
Who would have thought? These were must-have in the barracks, when the NAAFI shop sold books. Ah, memories.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
And, whilst scanning the watery book site, found this;
Who would have thought? These were must-have in the barracks, when the NAAFI shop sold books. Ah, memories.
Found what?
 
And, whilst scanning the watery book site, found this;
Who would have thought? These were must-have in the barracks, when the NAAFI shop sold books. Ah, memories.
And 'Edge' don't forget 'Edge !' :)
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
And 'Edge' don't forget 'Edge !' :)
I read a couple of those recently, for nostalgia's sake. Early ones much as I remember but the newer ones are a bit PC.
Incidentally, there was a pilot film on, I think. Netflix for Edge. It was not bad at all but never saw sign of another.
 
A J.T.Edson book for £21 second hand.
Fecking hell. You used to be able to get them new for 20p. Read about a hundred of them when I was a teenager. Calamity Jane and Belle Starr may have featured in several fantasies.

Read The October Man novella by Ben Aaronovitch. Basically a short version of his first Peter Grant- Rivers of London but set in Germany. No stunning plot twists or anything. I assume it's leading to a crossover story or joint mission between the Folly and the Abteilung KDA.

Also read this week a book the author of which Aaronovitch tweeted about. The Ides of April is the first in a series featuring Flavia Albia, a comely young widow in ancient Rome who works as a sort of private investigator and who has to help solve the mystery of a serial killer on the Aventine. You'll figure out the culprit a chapter or two before Flavia does. Lindsey Davis is the author of the series and also a previous one featuring Flavia's father.
 
Fecking hell. You used to be able to get them new for 20p. Read about a hundred of them when I was a teenager. Calamity Jane and Belle Starr may have featured in several fantasies.

Read The October Man novella by Ben Aaronovitch. Basically a short version of his first Peter Grant- Rivers of London but set in Germany. No stunning plot twists or anything. I assume it's leading to a crossover story or joint mission between the Folly and the Abteilung KDA.

Also read this week a book the author of which Aaronovitch tweeted about. The Ides of April is the first in a series featuring Flavia Albia, a comely young widow in ancient Rome who works as a sort of private investigator and who has to help solve the mystery of a serial killer on the Aventine. You'll figure out the culprit a chapter or two before Flavia does. Lindsey Davis is the author of the series and also a previous one featuring Flavia's father.
I'd like a bit more background development, maybe a story set in WW2 to set the scene of much of the stuff leading up to the Rivers of London series but I don't actually feel Aaranovitch has the depth of writing style to do the setting justice.
 
And 'Edge' don't forget 'Edge !' :)
They're on Kindle now.



As is Herne the Hunter.



My father used read these and I read them after him. Happy feckin days.

There was another series like these featuring a Union Army officer in the Civil War (not Bernard Corwell's one). Anyone remember what it was?
 
They're on Kindle now.



As is Herne the Hunter.



My father used read these and I read them after him. Happy feckin days.

There was another series like these featuring a Union Army officer in the Civil War (not Bernard Corwell's one). Anyone remember what it was?
A lot of the Western films and novels inspired one of the most obscure of David Gemmells novel series' (and one of my favourites). The Jerusalem Man.

 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
And 'Edge' don't forget 'Edge !' :)
Bloody Hell ! Josiah C Hedges, that takes me back, I read a couple 30 odd years ago!

On a more serious note [snowflake alert] I'm currently reading "Green Eyed Boys" in an effort to appreciate recent military history.

I was 18 at the time of Op Corporate, and for most of the civvy population the outcome was something to be celebrated.

By Christ, this book is harrowing reading for anyone with an ounce of imagination. I'd never claim to understand other's perspectives, but I understand a hell of a lot more than I did.

:-(
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
They're on Kindle now.



As is Herne the Hunter.







My father used read these and I read them after him. Happy feckin days.

There was another series like these featuring a Union Army officer in the Civil War (not Bernard Corwell's one). Anyone remember what it was?
1561193720928.png


Possibly this?
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Fecking hell. You used to be able to get them new for 20p. Read about a hundred of them when I was a teenager. Calamity Jane and Belle Starr may have featured in several fantasies.

Read The October Man novella by Ben Aaronovitch. Basically a short version of his first Peter Grant- Rivers of London but set in Germany. No stunning plot twists or anything. I assume it's leading to a crossover story or joint mission between the Folly and the Abteilung KDA.
They were ubiquitous. Scattered around every barrack room and apc, along with war comics.

Re 'The October Man', I've been dithering about buying it, but thanks to your summation I probably won't. Well, not yet perhaps. I do think the stories have been getting slightly weaker recently, and like another poster, I would have liked to read more about the war years.
 
They were ubiquitous. Scattered around every barrack room and apc, along with war comics.

Re 'The October Man', I've been dithering about buying it, but thanks to your summation I probably won't. Well, not yet perhaps. I do think the stories have been getting slightly weaker recently, and like another poster, I would have liked to read more about the war years.
Too many short stories and novellas rather than the much awaited full length next installment.... that also describes Patrick Rothfuss too sadly.
 

Latest Threads

Top