What are you reading right now?

udipur

LE
Book Reviewer
May I recommend "Dusty Warriors: Modern Soldiers at War" by the late Richard Holmes who, in 2004, was Honorary Colonel of 1 PWRR and visited them whilst they were in Iraq. He provides a much better overview of the activities of the regiment rather than the, albeit dramatic, events in Al Amarah. There are also photos of "Tigris".

This is not to denigrate Dan Mills' book which I still consider to be one of the best of its genre but his area of concern was Al Amarah alone. I thought his explanation of the difference of opinion with his OC was understandable. The regiment had gone on the tour thinking that it would be a peace-keeping mission and I doubt the command had really considered what was going to happen in any other event. No-one foresaw that it was going to be as gritty as it became.

The OC was concerned with getting all of his command out alive while his sniper platoon sergeant had got the war-fighting bone well and truely between the teeth. Everyone was getting tired and on edge - it was always going to have its friction points. Featherstone went on to lecture on leadership at Sandhurst and Mills left the army
Thanks, will do


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
View attachment 387467 Just finished Sniper One, about Y Coy, 1PWRR on their tour of Iraq, 2004.

Firstly, it sounded like a great tour was had, inasmuch as one and all got to mix it up with the enemy and engage in some serious lead swapping. It sounded like they took some malleting with the incoming and they gave back more so good for them.

Secondly, I expected the usual "we're ******* professional, my boys are ace, Ruperts are cnuts" approach to the telling and wasn't disappointed. However, I was surprised that he took a few swings at his OC who came out of the tour with an MC and no mention in the book of why or how, despite his obvious pride in the regimental tally of gongs at the end.

Thirdly, I finished the book with the sense that a lot more had happened on the tour, Mills was more than aware of it, yet it was about his team and their experiences, even as if the rest of the company were there in a lesser role.

Call me cynical but reading up on the BG's time left me thinking that he'd painted a unnecessarily one-eyed view of what, in anyone's book, would be a fantastic display of courage, tenacity and sheer bloody mindedness by a large body of dedicated soldiers. Hats off to all of them and acknowledgement by one and all justly deserved.
According to a WO2 in 6 Scots, the author utilised a hidden dictaphone to enhance tour tales for his book. The book is good with a pinch of salt, as is dusty warriors. Unluckily for the Pwrr they rocked up, into a month old civil war that wasn’t pleasant polite or peacekeeping. Their 432 mortar wagons left behind, meant ilum was launched from dug in mortars pits fell shorter than the LI’s in the March/April time.
 
image.jpeg


Follows the lives of the boys of Charlie Company before,during and after their deployment to Vietnam and the formation of the Mobile Riverine Force.
Very much a Vietnam War 'Band of Brothers ' type book and one of the best I've read on that war.
 
Been after a copy of this for ages



As history is generally written by the victors I thought it would be interesting to see it from the other side for a change


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Emily Maitlis bringing out a book this week: ‘The imperfect art of making news’.
Think I might get this one.

@bigeye you in there anywhere?,
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
View attachment 387742

Follows the lives of the boys of Charlie Company before,during and after their deployment to Vietnam and the formation of the Mobile Riverine Force.
Very much a Vietnam War 'Band of Brothers ' type book and one of the best I've read on that war.
Read this a while back ( may even have reviewed it) Excellent book and very worthwhile reading.
 
Just finished re-reading October Sky by Homer H. Hickam which is also known as Rocket Boys. It is in turns the most inspirational, funny, maddening and saddening book I have ever read. Yes, its a book, not a novel.
Essentially it is the story of a group of boys growing up in a coal mining town in West Virginia where the best one could hope for was to either get a college scholarship to play football or a job in the coal mine. Then in 1957 Sputnik happened and the group of boys decided they would launch their own rocket.
The leading boy (the author) had a mother who supported her son despite the disasters along the way and a father (who was the mine supervisor) who saw nothing better than for his son to follow him down the mine. The school principle regarded the boys as time wasters but a young science teacher saw the potential and encouraged them.
The description of the final launch is both a triumph and saddening. The epilogue details what became of the boys of the Big Creek Missile Agency in later life and its fair to say that they all achieved much more in their life than could have been expected at the beginning, especially the author.

1555384049054.png
 
As history is generally written by the victors I thought it would be interesting to see it from the other side for a change
Despite being written by a 'victor' from Para Regt. That aside, that it tackles the subject from the German POV, and the overall detail and context provide a great perspective from the other side of 'A Bridge Too Far'.
 
Been after a copy of this for ages



As history is generally written by the victors I thought it would be interesting to see it from the other side for a change


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Lt Col Kershaw, fine officer and a good writer. Have you read his "Tank Men"
I was with him in the intro. another cracking read.
 
Lt Col Kershaw, fine officer and a good writer. Have you read his "Tank Men"
I was with him in the intro. another cracking read.
Not but will add that to the list. Ta for the recommendation
 
The Mary Rose by Margaret Rule (rip) this was first published when the ship and some of the artefacts were beginning to surface, My second reading of it, and some of the questions in the text have since been answered.
 
anyone interested in the space race, ICBM's into space exploration, not only the race between The USSR and USA, but the in fighting between General Maderis the US Army Ballistic Missile agency, and the USAF & USN. the Army had the Jupiter Missile ready to go, but the Government wanted the Airforce and Navy to take it on, and the failures of Thor, all the while The Russians getting closer and closer to launching Sputnik. Edge of the seat read.
 
Just finished re-reading October Sky by Homer H. Hickam which is also known as Rocket Boys. It is in turns the most inspirational, funny, maddening and saddening book I have ever read. Yes, its a book, not a novel.
Essentially it is the story of a group of boys growing up in a coal mining town in West Virginia where the best one could hope for was to either get a college scholarship to play football or a job in the coal mine. Then in 1957 Sputnik happened and the group of boys decided they would launch their own rocket.
The leading boy (the author) had a mother who supported her son despite the disasters along the way and a father (who was the mine supervisor) who saw nothing better than for his son to follow him down the mine. The school principle regarded the boys as time wasters but a young science teacher saw the potential and encouraged them.
The description of the final launch is both a triumph and saddening. The epilogue details what became of the boys of the Big Creek Missile Agency in later life and its fair to say that they all achieved much more in their life than could have been expected at the beginning, especially the author.

View attachment 388095
You'll notice that the title of the film is an anagram of the title of the book. I believe Hickam came up with it when the hollywood types were griping that women wouldn't go and see a film called "Rocket Boys".
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top