What are you reading right now?

Across an Angry Sea. The SAS in the Falklands War. by Lt Gen Sir Cedric Delves. I had the honour and privilege of meeting Sir Cedric in Port Stanley last month when we were both on visits to the Falklands. View attachment 384677 View attachment 384677
I would be interested to know the author's thoughts on that subject. There is a fair amount of contradictory evidence/beliefs/whatever on their effectiveness in that campaign. There is on YouTube a video of a lecture given by a former RN admiral who happened to be an observer on the one remaining Wessex that had to extract them from the Fortuna Glacier on South Georgia Island. It makes for very interesting viewing.
 
Across an Angry Sea. The SAS in the Falklands War. by Lt Gen Sir Cedric Delves. I had the honour and privilege of meeting Sir Cedric in Port Stanley last month when we were both on visits to the Falklands. View attachment 384677 View attachment 384677
I would be interested to know the author's thoughts on that subject. There is a fair amount of contradictory evidence/beliefs/whatever on their effectiveness in that campaign. There is on YouTube a video of a lecture given by a former RN admiral who happened to be an observer on the one remaining Wessex that had to extract them from the Fortuna Glacier on South Georgia Island. It makes for very interesting viewing.
He was on the Dan Snow podcast not long ago, along with Danny West. So matter of fact and understated.

Link:

The SAS in the Falklands Part 1 with Sir Cedric Delves & Danny West | Dan Snow's History Hit on acast

I found it on the Apple podcast app no problem as well.


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Just finished Anthony Middleton's book and was left feeling short changed and disappointed, in that he explains some parts of his life in great detail (including Pirbright and prison), and then skates over others, such as why he quit the Marines and how he got the SAS TV gig, and the idea behind it, especially as he covers "Mutiny" in some detail.

It was a very easy read, but it left me expecting more. Perhaps he has a sequel in mind?
 
View attachment 384673
If only they didn't speak English - notes from Trump's America by Jon Sopel.
Just started recently in a couple of chapters already. Lucidly written and as unbiased as a BBC reporter can be.
Reads well and I have learned a few things already.

Just like our ARRSE contributor from across the pond @LJONESY says, Hillary was detested by far more people than disliked Trump and many people felt discontented and left behind, so that is how a vain, bullying, cretinous dolt became President.
p.s. Just to be fair @LJONESY did not say the bit about Trump - I did.
I downloaded this and am working on it today. Not bad for a Brit, so far he does seem to get it more right then most foreigners. It does however offer me quite a bit of insight into the British thought process! Thank you for the heads up!
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Orwell again, 3/6 this time, 'Keep the Aspidistra Flying' (1934), a novel in which Orwell rants, via his rather silly unheroic 'hero', against the power money has over everybody. Another target was people at the poorer end of the middle class spectrum trying to hang on by their eyelashes to their social status. Still very good reading with many an absolutely marvellous turn of phrase. Unlike a lot of fiction I read on, actually wanting to know how thigs would turn out for the 'hero'. Startlingly clear descriptions of life at the very bottom of the 1934 bedsit world.
 
Just finished "A Rumour of War" by Philip Caputo, lve seen it mentioned in this thread a few times.

Wow, just.....wow.

Caputo mentions other books at the end of his, one of witch l have just ordered, its called "Close Quarters" by Larry Heinemann. Anyone read it?
 
Just finishing Team of Rivals about the Lincoln presidency. Written by a woman...not being sexist but personally I don't favour female writers. It suffers too much from focusing on female concerns at the time. Mary Lincoln, on becoming established in Washington, seems to have become obsessed with her husband's balls, concerned about how big they were compared to those of members of his cabinet. In particular she was jealous of Sewards balls, whioch were much bigger and more lavish than Lincoln's. The author might have spent more time describing ebvents of the Civil War and Emancipation. Informative in places, but getting on for 1000 pages I wouldn't really recommend it....

Just starting Blair Inc...about the business activities of the slimy currant...I think it will suffer from the wall of secrecy surrounding the piece of shoit....
 
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I think someone mentioned the WW1 sequels to Flashman. I downloaded the first one but although the first 2/3 was a typical ripping yarn of our anti-hero, the author has just introduced a bizarre Dan Brown-esque plot line about the Templars and the descendants of Jesus. I'm not sure I can finish it.
I may have mentioned it - but I was so underwhelmed that I have forgotten the plot!
 
I have put Battleworn to bed and for the want of something different, have opened this:

a-woman-in-berlin-1.jpg


Synopsis:
For eight weeks in 1945, as Berlin fell to the Russian army, a young woman kept a daily record of life in her apartment building and among its residents. "With bald honesty and brutal lyricism" (Elle), the anonymous author depicts her fellow Berliners in all their humanity, as well as their cravenness, corrupted first by hunger and then by the Russians. "Spare and unpredictable, minutely observed and utterly free of self-pity" (The Plain Dealer, Cleveland), A Woman in Berlin tells of the complex relationship between civilians and an occupying army and the shameful indignities to which women in a conquered city are always subject--the mass rape suffered by all, regardless of age or infirmity.

A Woman in Berlin stands as "one of the essential books for understanding war and life" (A. S. Byatt, author of Possession).

Interestingly, as is explained in the foreword to the (eBook) version I have, the author is now named.

E2A: on my basic German course in Berlin in 1979, our instructor (female) had been a nurse in Berlin when the Russians arrived in 1945. After teaching German to Russian officers in Karlshorst when she reached pensionable age she was allowed to move to West Berlin. I was the only non-Royal Irish Ranger on the course, and no, we didn't mention the war.
 
Just finished Anthony Middleton's book and was left feeling short changed and disappointed, in that he explains some parts of his life in great detail (including Pirbright and prison), and then skates over others, such as why he quit the Marines and how he got the SAS TV gig, and the idea behind it, especially as he covers "Mutiny" in some detail.

It was a very easy read, but it left me expecting more. Perhaps he has a sequel in mind?

Ditto my thoughts as well, appears to believe that some of the antics he got up to in the para engrs was cutting edge, and not normal activity in BAOR, not a mention of naked bars etc.
 
I was right about Blair Inc. Nothing really stunning in there or that can't be worked out with a bit of common sense. Not the most evil turd on the planet, but definite ambitions in that direction....might like to meditate on what happened to his 'pal' Gaddafi.
 

udipur

LE
Book Reviewer
Not sure I've got the stomach for this at the moment's

Anybody had a crack?




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six wives.jpg


Although I don't agree with the author when he's on BBC QT, this is a very entertaining and informative book. His writing style is that of a Court gossip, although backed up with political and military history of the times and the allegiances required of an English King.
 
Not reading it, but one of my faves...Venus on the Halfshell...by 'Kilgore Trout'...go for it !!!!! Was given an original 1st ed. paperback when people thought I was going to croak...kept me smiling! If you want to know who the irresponsible crunt who kept me alive is....I aint telling...a damned good chap IMHO....
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Just finished "A Rumour of War" by Philip Caputo, lve seen it mentioned in this thread a few times.

Wow, just.....wow.

Caputo mentions other books at the end of his, one of witch l have just ordered, its called "Close Quarters" by Larry Heinemann. Anyone read it?
Try Del Corsos gallery. It's fiction . By Caputo,
Great book,
 

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