What are you reading right now?

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
For those Manchester Utd supporters who read this thread I was lucky enough to get The United Trinity by the late David Meek for Christmas, a story on the history of Dennis Law, Bobby Charlton and George Best.
I’ve only finished chapter two, picked it up, an hour ago=-D.
A great history lesson when football was a proper sport. I think I’m going to enjoy this book.
 
Slightly off thread .

For those who may be interested .... a BBC Radio audio version of " The Cruel Sea "by Nicholas Monsarrat .... linky ...

.

... classic .

ETA ... I use a package ...linky ... 4K YouTube to MP3 | Free YouTube to MP3 Converter ... to download such books ... it automatically downloads and then converts into MP3 format giving much reduced file size
 
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seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
£2 I think (still had publisher's compliments card in it) hardback of 'The Buccaneer King' by Graham A Thomas, a bio of Sir Henry Morgan, privateer and later Governor of Jamaica. The first 140pp describe his career raiding the Spanish including taking Maracaibo and Panama and show him as an absolutely brilliant general who out-thought his adversaries at ever turn, and a brilliant leader of men, most of whom were appalling riff-raff only in it for money. Govt at home increasingly bothered as HM & Jamaica's idea of who we were at war with clashed with who (Fr, Dutch, Sp) we were trying to make peace with. Ashore and comfortably settled on large plantations, the last 60 pp describe the political shenanigans as crooked politicos who wanted rid of Morgan had to realise he was the only man competent to defend Jamaica.

The warry stuff - trekking, starving, fighting through 'impenetrable' jungle etc - brilliantly done. Worth maybe looking out other naval work by this author.

HM's 1st cousin twice removed married one of my 6 greats uncles.
 
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I’m about two thirds of the way through The Earth is weeping by Peter Cozzens. It’s the account of the wars between the plains Indians and the US government from around the time of the civil war. It’s not a subject that I previously had more than a passing knowledge of and I was inspired to find out more after watching the film Hostiles. The book has really impressed me. It’s well researched, packed with historical footnotes and the narrative is compelling. It opened my eyes to the actual realities of the conflict insofar as dispelling some historical myths, particularly the noble savage myth that became popular in the sixties and seventies. The plains Indians were under ever increasing pressure from white migration and treaties and promises were indeed reneged on, however they were never united apart from when it was expedient to be so and fought each other as much as the white man, they were also as guilty of committing atrocities as the government forces, routinely targeting homesteaders and those who would be today classed as non combatants, murdering and torturing as a matter of course. The book also describes the realities of being a frontier soldier in the US army, poorly paid, often badly led and with little or no real training.
 
Starting this tonight:

for-the-dead.jpg


Synopsis:

In Bangkok, an American travel journalist and his Thai family find themselves inadvertently entangled in a web of dirty cops and far-reaching corruption when their daughter’s ill-gotten cell phone displays photographs of some very crooked cops, all of them thoroughly dead.

Poke Rafferty is happier than he's ever been. He's financially solvent, his family is about to grow larger, and his adopted Thai daughter, Miaow, seems to have settled in at high school. All that is endangered when Miaow and her boyfriend, Andrew, buy a stolen iPhone from a shady vendor and discover photographs of two dead police officers on it - disgraced officers, violently murdered to avenge the long-dead. Surrounding the murder investigation is a conspiracy that reaches the highest reaches of Bangkok law enforcement, and perhaps beyond. It soon becomes apparent that Miaow's discovery threatens the entire family—and if that's not enough, in order to survive, they may ultimately have to depend on someone who, in the past, has already betrayed them.
 
Scourge of the Swastika. Puts to Ed the myth of the clean Wehrmacht and the ignorance of the German people.

Just got a copy of David Irving’s ‘the mares nest’ before he went all holocaust denial on is.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
Re-Reading 'Protect & Defenc' by Eric L Harry - one of my favourite war novels. Basic synopsis, Anarchy has risen as a movement and Russia no longer exists as a nation-state - all government is disbanded as part of a social experiment by the Anarchists leader. As a result, the UN is forced to move into Siberia to safeguard the Fomer Russian nuclear weapons, but China has the same idea and invades in the midst of a Siberian winter.
The novel tells the story of several participants - The US president, the US/UN Army commander, two new US infantrymen, a US journo, a Chinese PLA platoon leader, the former leader of the Russian Presidents security team and the Anarchist leader and several other bit players. Some very good battle sequences and scarily thought out terrorist attacks and assassinations, but the odd error as well (one attack takes place at a London vs Liverpool football match at Wembley).
Would recommend it to all
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Mrs S brought back from the library "One Man's War" by Richard Beale. Born in 1920, in 2014 Beale decided to set down his war story. He joined the RN as an (Hostilities Only) Ordinary Seaman in 1940 and after service in a cruiser-size minelayer was picked for officer training at HMS King Alfred (aka Lancing College) at Hove. On commissioning as a Ty A/S/Lt RNVR he was sent to 72', 54 ton HDML 1070 as her First Lieutenant, and served in her at home, succeeding to her command in an amazingly short time and then being given brand new HDML 1267 which was sent to the Med just in time for Beale to be tasked with leading the landing craft in for Husky. He left her after being badly wounded and (fortunately only temporarily) blinded when her smoke float exploded in front of him. Mended, he was given a second stripe and the larger ML135 which seems to have spent most of her time minesweeping (@Dunservin ) in the Adriatic and elsewhere. I found this a fascinating tale of make-do at the informal Harry Tate end of the Navy. Amazingly, in spite of some quite dodgy odd-jobbing, he seemed to get through the whole war without being shot at but had an extraordinary escape from one particular moored mine. I found this very low key narrative strangely fascinating - some weird dits - and difficult to put down. After the war he eventually became an actor, see his Wiki. He died in 2017.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Re-Reading 'Protect & Defenc' by Eric L Harry - one of my favourite war novels. Basic synopsis, Anarchy has risen as a movement and Russia no longer exists as a nation-state - all government is disbanded as part of a social experiment by the Anarchists leader. As a result, the UN is forced to move into Siberia to safeguard the Fomer Russian nuclear weapons, but China has the same idea and invades in the midst of a Siberian winter.
The novel tells the story of several participants - The US president, the US/UN Army commander, two new US infantrymen, a US journo, a Chinese PLA platoon leader, the former leader of the Russian Presidents security team and the Anarchist leader and several other bit players. Some very good battle sequences and scarily thought out terrorist attacks and assassinations, but the odd error as well (one attack takes place at a London vs Liverpool football match at Wembley).
Would recommend it to all
Brilliant book. I read it about once a year. I like the author's other books too; 'Invasion' especially, although 'A
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Boris Johnsons book on Churchill. It does say the Nazis captured Stalingrad but it's so poorly written I had to check again before realising he was pushing some sort of counter factual line on Ww2 without Curchill.


This one's going on the charity pile.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
Scourge of the Swastika. Puts to Ed the myth of the clean Wehrmacht and the ignorance of the German people.

Just got a copy of David Irving’s ‘the mares nest’ before he went all holocaust denial on is.
Couple of others, one is Hitler's willing executioners by Daniel Goldhagen and any books by Ceserani, Gilber or Rees, blows the concept or both civiaian or military ignorance out of the water.
 
'Polaris: The History of the UK's Submarine Force' by Keith Hall.

It's about the development of Polaris and how we ended up with the Submarine-based Nuclear Deterrent. Currently on chapter 2 and to be honest, it's not gripping me. Feels a little disorganised and jumps from point to point in no particular order.

I'm going to try and finish it but to be honest I doubt I'll manage it.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Can I recommend an author? Murray Davies; he writes in several genres but I very much like the ones about Irish terrorism. He is no apologist, rather he condemns them heartily and his stories are very good on detail and contain wonderfully authentic dialogue. They are tense and driven. Well worth a read.
Books by Murray Davies (Author of Collaborator)
 
Didn't he write and perform Cop Killer or something similar, which celebrated the killing of police?

May he die a horribly painful death.
He performed "cop killer", not sure if he wrote it. The big contraverial point at the time was he was highlighted, as a rapper, and the news outlets completely ignored the fact it was a a heavy metal song.
 
Mrs S found this for me - £1, clean ppbk of '1215' by Danny Danziger and John Gillingham. Basically Magna Carta, what it actually says and why, and how we got there dynastically and politically, with lots of background on what life was actually like at all levels at the time. K John weak and sneaky and totally untrustworthy, the Pope sticking his oar in etc. A baron would have his man hand him a bunch of well-pressed hay to wipe his (the baron's) arrse. Peasants on the 'wrong' side get pillaged, raped and left to starve. A good read to go with Danziger's '1000' where everyone had parasites crawling out of their skin.
Good, isn't it? I do own a copy of 1000, but haven't read it yet.
 
You know, having just caught up with the last few pages, I should probably be embarrassed that what I'm currently reading is....

Marvel's Deadpool : The complete collection, Volume 1.

In my defense, I do still have; Vietnam, by Max Hastings; Stalin's Generals, edited by Harold Shukman; The Karamazov Brothers, by Fyodor Dostoevsky and A Poem for every night of the year, edited by Allie Esiri in my large stack of 'get round to it, you twat' pile. Once I stop giggling like a nervous schoolgirl.
 
You know, having just caught up with the last few pages, I should probably be embarrassed that what I'm currently reading is....

Marvel's Deadpool : The complete collection, Volume 1.

In my defense, I do still have; Vietnam, by Max Hastings; Stalin's Generals, edited by Harold Shukman; The Karamazov Brothers, by Fyodor Dostoevsky and A Poem for every night of the year, edited by Allie Esiri in my large stack of 'get round to it, you twat' pile. Once I stop giggling like a nervous schoolgirl.
What? No "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy?
 

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