What are you reading right now?

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Finished the new Lee Childs, less than great. The abolition of Britain. by Peter Hitchens, it must be my week for awful books.

Looking forward to the most recent Le Carre.
 
Recently I was given a copy of 'The Struggle for Europe' by Chester Wilmot. He was an Ozzie journalist who amongst other things, landed by glider on D-Day but whose fame was sadly cut short by a Comet crash in (I think) 1955. The book is marvellous, excellent analysis of decisions and actions - I might even start to like Monty, Patton pisses me off even more than he did before...….
Yes, tragically he was one of the casualties in the Incident involving Yoke Peter (Flight 781). Quite a groundbreaking and important crash (despite the tragedy) in aviation and engineering due to some of the design changes that followed for structures that would experience varying pressures during operation.
 
Robert Tombs "The English and their History". I have it on audio book. There is so much I thought I knew about (but did not) that is properly fleshed out in a proper chronological progression which seems to be absent in these unenlightened times.
Excellent barely covers it, I particularly commend the chapters dealing with Slavery and the Empire, I came away feeling proud...not guilty.
 
Well I've finished Mike Borlace's Spider Zero Seven and, at the end of the book it was clear that there has to be another volume as this volume only covers his time in the Rhodesian Air Force. At random I have selected this as my next non-fiction read:

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Judging by the introduction this synopsis doesn't do it justice:

The Labour Party welcomed the Russian Revolution in 1917: it paved the way for the birth of a socialist superpower and ushered in a new era in Soviet governance. Labour excused the Bolshevik excesses and prepared for its own revolution in Britain.

In 1929, Stalin deported hundreds of thousands of men, women and children to work in labour camps. Subjected to appalling treatment, thousands died. When news of the camps leaked out in Britain, there were protests demanding the government ban imports of timber cut by slave labourers.

The Labour government of the day dismissed mistreatment claims as Tory propaganda and blocked appeals for an inquiry. Despite the Cabinet privately acknowledging the harsh realities of the work camps, Soviet denials were publicly repeated as fact. One Labour minister even defended them as part of 'a remarkable economic experiment'.

Labour and the Gulag explains how Britain's Labour Party was seduced by the promise of a socialist utopia and enamoured of a Russian Communist system it sought to emulate. It reveals the moral compromises Labour made, and how it turned its back on the people in order to further its own political agenda.

Bugger, it's 747 pages . . .
Well I finished this today - and highly recommend it. It was published last year and has a postscript commenting on the rise of Corbyn. Absolutely fascinating read, well researched and referenced. There is a review here: Book review, 'Labour and the Gulag: Russia and the Seduction of the British Left'

And now a change of pace. I found this and started reading it in the dentist's waiting room in Bangkok and when I got home downloaded it.

a-year-in-provence.jpg
 
A very good book, better than the TV series.....
 
I spend five weeks a year in Provence, bimbling about in the van; this one is on my list when I get around to it!
Well I finished this today - and highly recommend it. It was published last year and has a postscript commenting on the rise of Corbyn. Absolutely fascinating read, well researched and referenced. There is a review here: Book review, 'Labour and the Gulag: Russia and the Seduction of the British Left'

And now a change of pace. I found this and started reading it in the dentist's waiting room in Bangkok and when I got home downloaded it.

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Sent from my SM-N910F using Tapatalk
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Mrs S found this in the library - fascinating. I think I must have done my three trips to the mystic East (including a few days in shambolic Sumatra) with my eyes wide shut. The story of the founding of Singapore is the climax but before that, Raffles at 30 was Lt Governor of Java for a few years before we had to hand it back to the Dutch. His bio is the main story and what a complex, driven man he was, and what appalling misfortunes did he have to get over.

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Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
For Philip Kerr fans, there are interviews with him on YouTube. It seems he was a regular on DW.

Info about his final book here: Philip Kerr's Final Bernie Gunther Novel Announced (With Details)

RIP indeed.
I was lucky enough to review Greeks bearing Gifts, which was released around the time of his death.
That was an excellent read and I for one am looking forward to reading this one, after which I might just start reading a few more of his books.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Your week of bad reads will continue.
Le Carre can be hard work. He can also be very good, it's a bit of a lucky dip with him.
 
I'm a huge Michael Connelly fan and enjoy the Bosch novels the most. Even though Bosch was a tunnel rat in Vietnam, I always thought of him as a large, mustachioed type and not of small stature. I liked Titus Welliver as an actor, although I don't know if he was the right choice for this role, but I've only seen two of the Bosch TV series, so I'll defer to those fans who've seen them all.

Cracking good reads, though.

Cheers,
Dan.
Somewhere in internet-world there is an interview video of Connelly. He is chatting about the telly series and pretty much say's that he held off on making, or having, the series made until he found the right person to play the role. He reckons Welliver fills his vision of the character to a T.

Not like Reacher being played by the midget Cruise, although with the camera angles he gets away with it admirably.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Somewhere in internet-world there is an interview video of Connelly. He is chatting about the telly series and pretty much say's that he held off on making, or having, the series made until he found the right person to play the role. He reckons Welliver fills his vision of the character to a T.

Not like Reacher being played by the midget Cruise, although with the camera angles he gets away with it admirably.
I've just finished 'The Late Show', which although not a Bosch, it references him. And the tv series. The main character is a female detective; Renee Ballard, and it works well. Good story.
 
I've just finished 'The Late Show', which although not a Bosch, it references him. And the tv series. The main character is a female detective; Renee Ballard, and it works well. Good story.
Seen. I like the way she seems to live on the beach.

The next Connelly offering brings the two characters together - it is due out later this month. Can't wait.
 
I have recently read a book on the history of the WRNS Womans Naval Service from when it commenced during World War One through the inter war years, World War Two, when it expanded vastly, up until the present times. Very interesting - "Britania's Daughters" The story of the WRNS.

I am also reading an autobiography of a V-Bomber RAF officer's experiences during the cold war years. - by Philip Goodall. the title of the book is "My Target was Leningrad - V Force: preserving our democracy.

The author was called up for National Service in the 1950s and stayed on after being offered a permanent Commission. The author spent some 30 years in the RAF as a career pilot.
 
A Year in Provence rattled past quickly, so it's back to Rhodesia:

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What am I reading right now? This thread!

What I have read lately though :

Mystery Spinner by Gideon Haigh . Boy's Own, Roy of the Rovers stuff....Jack Iverson , a suburban estate agent in his '30s, recently discharged from war service as the MT sergeant in an anti-aircraft regiment, walks in to a second division cricket club in Melbourne in 1946 and asks if he can have a bowl. And bowl he does. Four years later he's playing for Australia in the Ashes. He can't bat. He can't field. But he can turn a ball consistently like almost no one else before or since. Australia win the 1950/51 Ashes in large part due to Iverson . Then he quits .....Gideon Haigh is definitely the best cricket writer, possibly the best sports writer ,I've read several of his books before, and this is very good.

Review: Mystery Spinner by Gideon Haigh

Now I'm reading a biography of General Sir Richard McCreery.

From the playing fields of Eton to El Alamein | The Spectator
 
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What am I reading right now? This thread!

What I have read lately though :

Mystery Spinner by Gideon Haigh . Boy's Own, Roy of the Rovers stuff....Jack Iverson , a suburban estate agent in his '30s, recently discharged from war service as the MT sergeant in an anti-aircraft regiment, walks in to a second division cricket club in Melbourne in 1946 and asks if he can have a bowl. And bowl he does. Four years later he's playing for Australia in the Ashes. He can't bat. He can't field. But he can turn a ball consistently like almost no one else before or since. Gideon Haigh is definitely the best cricket writer, possibly the best sports writer ,I've read several of his books before, and this is very good.

Review: Mystery Spinner by Gideon Haigh

Now I'm reading a biography of General Sir Richard McCreery.

From the playing fields of Eton to El Alamein | The Spectator
Oh, this Sporting Life...

Read about this chap recently.
Robert W. H. Everett - Wikipedia
 

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