What are you reading right now?

Started reading the book behind the new 12 Strong film thats out or due out. US Sf deployment in Oct 01 to galvanise & assist the northern alliance in AFG. Was originally published as the Horse Soldiers.

I'm halfway through it & its written for brain dead yanks who love all the god, country family hee ha sh1te. As a limey its so sickly sweet & sugar coated with heroic descriptions of each rootin' tootin' god fearing WARRIOR you sometimes want to vom.

On the other hand when the author does delve into the tactical , logistical & technical side of the story its very interesting. The book would be less than half its size though. Glad i didn't pay full dollar for it.
 
Haven't posted for a while, but I have been reading away. My current non-fiction eBook is:

queen-of-spies.jpg


And my current fiction read is:

flashman-and-the-emperor.jpg


Incidentally, my Kobo Aura HD which is a few years old now, and in use several times a day, has developed some annoying faults, although it does still work. On my recent trip back to Australia I invested in a Kobo Aura One as a replacement which is very nice to use. Transferring all my Kobo-sourced books is easy, but I still have to put them into Collections (by author or subject). Then there are the non-Kobo books to deal with!
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor

Just started reading this, having read the first in the series a while ago. Pretty good actually, even though it's a wee bit fanciful. The hero, Solomon Creed is a most enigmatic figure, The first book introduces him, sort of, and the second seems to put a bit more flesh on his bones, as far as I can see so far.
This is first in series. Very readable.
 

udipur

LE
Book Reviewer
Haven't posted for a while, but I have been reading away. My current non-fiction eBook is:

View attachment 331977

And my current fiction read is:

View attachment 331978

Incidentally, my Kobo Aura HD which is a few years old now, and in use several times a day, has developed some annoying faults, although it does still work. On my recent trip back to Australia I invested in a Kobo Aura One as a replacement which is very nice to use. Transferring all my Kobo-sourced books is easy, but I still have to put them into Collections (by author or subject). Then there are the non-Kobo books to deal with!
I always use Calibre (open source) which can convert most formats into the required ebook format.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Finished the first five books in John Ringo's "Paladin of Shadows" series. I like them. Very politically incorrect, lots of violence, and a Hind shows up. And is awesome.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Gift from someone having a clearout, 'The Secret Invaders' by Bill Strutton (1958), a history of Combined Operations Pilotage Parties (COPP). Strutton is a novelist and unlike formal annotated histories, here COPP is presented as an adventure story (although a true bill). Strutton got most of his material from COPP's founder, Nigel Wilmott, and his wife ex-L/Wren Prue, together with accounts from a number of other COPPists. Strutton brings us several tales of endurance, extreme fatigue, extraordinary courage and true heroism, bringing us word pictures of what it was like to sit in a canoe yards of a defended enemy coast, or to swim in to it all on your on loaded down with all sorts of kit, knowing that capture would involve torture and death and worse, expose the landing plan. The last quarter of the book covers COPP in the Far East, probing beaches in Burma, Siam and Malaya and closes with an extraordinary march across Malaya where survivors of COPP3 were in the care of the (Communist) Chinese resistance forces, dodging Malays and Japanese alike.
 
I have just taken out a book written by Martin Bell, the old BBC TV correspondant and Ex MP who stood as an Independant, and is famous for his white linen suits.

He writes about his experiences when doing National Service in the 1950s. The book is entitled 'The End of Empire', and is about The Cyprus Emergency during the Eoka Troubles, and is an insight into British colonial policy druring the last days of Empire. I haven't begun tor ead this, so should be a good read for any Ex Servcieman, Ex National Serviceman or serving military nowadays. It is of interest to me as I served in Cyprus in 1966 for a six month detachment with the UN Cyprus, HQ based on the old Nicosia International Airport.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Cheap somewhere, good copy of 'Sink the Belgrano' by journo Mike Rossiter (2007), 300pp of good reading. A very good workmanlike account of SSN Conqueror's trip South, the Falkands War in general economically sketched in as support. Excellent treatment of the political background, including both wishful and muddled thinking, and the detail of the decision process that allowed Conqueror to fish the Arg cruiser. Research included British and Arg interviews including Conx's 1st Lt and other crew members; Rossiter also managed to FoI Conqueror's original patrol report. Various minor howlers where the journo has bridged from one fact to another without using a naval proof reader, but this does not spoil a pacy narrative, particularly as Conqueror manoeuvres to attack. With adventure stories like this I do wonder why anyone bothers with fiction. And I still don't get the fuss about that Sun headline of GOTCHA! Spot on I thought at the time.
 
Picked up "I am Pilgrim" from Waterstones as a time filler. Must admit it's turning into something quite good.
Just started it and SWMBO has been clearing her throat and huffing a lot as I have spent the entire day with my iNoPhone glued to my face; it is very good. Well-written, well-paced thriller (so far - I have got to ch. 12 so far today).
 
I've just started this:

51V6UnGDEOL._SY346_.jpg


E2A: the book has an interesting structure, with each chapter comprising the recollections of one of the people supposedly involved, including Sir Harry Flashman's father. The story is based on fact and uses colloquial expressions in use at the time, fortunately supported by a glossary.
 
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Escort The Battle of the Atlantic by D. A. Rayner, published by the Naval Institute Press of Annapolis, Maryland as part of their Classics of Naval Literature series.

What makes this so interesting, apart from it being well-written, is Commander Rayner was the highest ranking officer in the RNVR, the first RNVR officer to command a HM warship, the first RNVR officer to command a destroyer and together with that was Captain (D) of a flotilla of them (6 S class ships).

Rayner went on to write two novels based on his experiences, one of which, "The Enemy Below" was made into a film with Robert Mitchum and Kurt Jurgens starring. Rayner also wrote another 2 historical novels, "The Long Fight" about a frigate action in the Napoleonic Wars and "The Small Spark of Courage" about a tank battle in 1944 France.

If you intend to read Escort, I encourage you to read the quite long introduction as it carefully explains not only the basic differences between RN, RNR and RNVR but how the issue of seniority between them was dealt with by the Admiralty. It becomes relevant to certain events Rayner writes about in the book. I am really enjoying the book and thoroughly recommend it to others here.
 
The Long Earth series by Terry Pratchet and Stephen Baxter
I recently bought all five books in the series as a boxed set for £12 from 'The Works'. I hadn't seen the previous reviews on here. I wish that I had!
The basic theme of the series is that of parallel worlds; how people react to them and what they do with them.
I'm a long-time fan of TP and I've read the Clarke/Baxter collaboration 'A Time Odyssey' but I found 'The Long Earth' series very disappointing. The first book, 'The Long Earth', seemed quite promising. Sadly, I found the whole series to be rather flabby and bland. By the time I got to the last book, I'd had enough and was just turning pages to get to the end. As far as I was concerned, the ending was very much "OK, so what?".
I don't think the series is worth the full price, but might be of interest if you see it in a second-hand shop or charity shop.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Escort The Battle of the Atlantic by D. A. Rayner, published by the Naval Institute Press of Annapolis, Maryland as part of their Classics of Naval Literature series.

What makes this so interesting, apart from it being well-written, is Commander Rayner was the highest ranking officer in the RNVR, the first RNVR officer to command a HM warship, the first RNVR officer to command a destroyer and together with that was Captain (D) of a flotilla of them (6 S class ships).

Rayner went on to write two novels based on his experiences, one of which, "The Enemy Below" was made into a film with Robert Mitchum and Kurt Jurgens starring. Rayner also wrote another 2 historical novels, "The Long Fight" about a frigate action in the Napoleonic Wars and "The Small Spark of Courage" about a tank battle in 1944 France.

If you intend to read Escort, I encourage you to read the quite long introduction as it carefully explains not only the basic differences between RN, RNR and RNVR but how the issue of seniority between them was dealt with by the Admiralty. It becomes relevant to certain events Rayner writes about in the book. I am really enjoying the book and thoroughly recommend it to others here.
Fancy me not having this already. I have ordered a ppbk copy from Amazon £2.44 inc p&P which is most of the cost I would think.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Just started it and SWMBO has been clearing her throat and huffing a lot as I have spent the entire day with my iNoPhone glued to my face; it is very good. Well-written, well-paced thriller (so far - I have got to ch. 12 so far today).
Excellent book, and a tad unusual in the storyline. Reviewed on here some time back. Follow up by the author in progress.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Stuart Tootal's book on 3 PARA's initial deployment to Helmand. ' Danger Close'
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Keep coming across names of people I met in Headley Court.

Colonel Tootal comes across as quite angry about the whole gig.

Review
" The most alarming aspect of Tootal’s narrative is the collective state of denial that descended on Whitehall when the going got tough. When Des Browne, one of Gordon Brown’s many hapless defence secretaries, visited the British contingent, he could not understand why the Paras were concentrating on military operations rather than development projects. Tootal put him straight: “Because, sir, this is Afghanistan and we are in the middle of a vicious counter-insurgency.” But Tootal’s stark assessment made little impression on Browne and his officials, who continued to deny the British force the equipment and manpower necessary to sustain the mission. "


I would be interested to hear whether DANBAT's Leopard II's went into action during the time the Danes were there.
 
Stuart Tootal's book on 3 PARA's initial deployment to Helmand. ' Danger Close'
View attachment 333106
Keep coming across names of people I met in Headley Court.

Colonel Tootal comes across as quite angry about the whole gig.

Review
" The most alarming aspect of Tootal’s narrative is the collective state of denial that descended on Whitehall when the going got tough. When Des Browne, one of Gordon Brown’s many hapless defence secretaries, visited the British contingent, he could not understand why the Paras were concentrating on military operations rather than development projects. Tootal put him straight: “Because, sir, this is Afghanistan and we are in the middle of a vicious counter-insurgency.” But Tootal’s stark assessment made little impression on Browne and his officials, who continued to deny the British force the equipment and manpower necessary to sustain the mission. "
Not surprising that he was angry about what occurred. The events depicted in "Kajaki" happened on his watch. The same events are covered in Patrick Bishop's book, "3 Para" and when you have personally zipped one of your soldiers into a bodybag and then carried it to the ambulance knowing that the man had died due to blood loss because there wasn't sufficient winch equipped helicopters available on a day when priority decisions about who to evacuate first had to be made, its not surprising you might be angry.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
One of our MSO's was late the Gungy Three...nice guy.

The book is now OBE to some extent. When ( in the far distant future) the Official History of Op Herrick comes to be written, there will be some insightful appendices....
 

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