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What are you reading right now?

I just finished the first volume of Johnathan Sumption's history of the Hundred Years War, and as pleasing as his writing style is, it made my head swim with the amount of names and places that are thrown about. One thing that I didn't know that this book taught me is that Edward III basically funded his campaigns from 1338-1347 with wool.

Anyhow, I need a break from tomes like that, so I'm going to sit down and give Joe Haldeman's "The Forever War" a try.
 
I just finished the first volume of Johnathan Sumption's history of the Hundred Years War, and as pleasing as his writing style is, it made my head swim with the amount of names and places that are thrown about. One thing that I didn't know that this book taught me is that Edward III basically funded his campaigns from 1338-1347 with wool.

Anyhow, I need a break from tomes like that, so I'm going to sit down and give Joe Haldeman's "The Forever War" a try.
Hence the significance of the Woolsack in the HoL.
 
Vespasian IV Rome's Lost Son by Robert Fabbri a fine series charting the rise of Vespasian to become Emperor.
If you like them you may like Colleen McCullough's "Masters of Rome" series, dealing with the death of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Empire. Sulla, Gaius Marius, Spartacus, Cicero and Julius Caesar all make appearances. And the books are great reads, with lots of historical indexes thrown in that put into context some of the more out-there things that take place therein.

As well as a useful glossary of Roman Latin sweary-words.
 
Currently at the start of reading Colleen McCullough's "The First Man in Rome", the first book of her "Masters of Rome" series, and a certain Gauis Marius has just popped up. I'm sure he'll not be doing much.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Evelyn Waugh's Sword of Honour.
The first volume, 'Officers and Gentlemen', is a sendup of Waugh's initial training in the RM, the formation of 1RM and the Dakar expedition & its conversion to 42 (RM) Commando after its return. Give or take some wild exaggeration and the fictional characters it is a true bill. My stepfather was in the same entry. His dislike of EW was comprehensively shared by everyone else. Just before the Dakar expedition sailed EW tore a strip off an SNCO in front of the troops. The CO immediately sent EW back to London for someone else to find a job for EW. London sent EW right back saying 'cope' and he unfortunately arrived back in time to sail as the expedition had been delayed a week. On the way out EW's party piece was buying all the cigars in the ship, leaving none for anybody else. For a straightforward account try 'To the War with Waugh' by John St John.

Waugh as later in Crete (2nd volume), where he proved to have considerable physical courage, and then in Yugoslavia (3rd volume) with Randolph Churchill. Waugh bet RC a case of Scotch that RC could read the entire Bible from end to end, in order to get RC shut up. To get EW out of the way at one point he was given a long leave to sit in Somerset writing 'Brideshead Revisited'.
 
Currently reading 2 books at the moment.

1) Call the Fire Brigade! by Allan Grice - Was a firefighter in LFB in the 70's. Very Well Written,

2) - Monash - about General Sir John Monash - Have only just picked it up, was a gift from Mrs Notwhoiam
 
Warriors: Extraordinary Tales From the Battlefield by Max Hastings and read by Nigel Carrington
Warriors: Extraordinary Tales from the Battlefield by Max Hastings
A back damn good read! Thoroughly recommended 9/10

The Murderer in Ruins by Cay Rademacher and read by Mark Meadows
The Murderer in Ruins (Frank Stave, #1) by Cay Rademacher (2 star ratings)
Another good read, set in (just) post-war in Germany. 7/10

Earthly Delights by Kay Greenwood and read by
Louise Severson
Earthly Delights (Corinna Chapman, #1) by Kerry Greenwood

Great fun – and the heroin is a fat baker!.
 
Anatomy of Failure by Harlan K Ullman. The author was former USN officer who then held a number of positions doing research for the Pentagon. He appears to have been a policy advisor to a number of administrations and now does private consultancy work.

The book is divided into chapters based around the Presidencies from Kennedy onwards to Obama. It was written after Trump's win but aside from one or two references he does not look at anything substantive from the current occupant of the White House. The book is essentially looking at the strategic policy failures that have led to the US losing every substantive military confrontation it has engaged in since WW2. I am up to the conclusion of GHW Bush's administration and, ironically, it is the one that he is most complimentary of for getting the big issues right.

Also reading the collected editions of Preacher. The graphic cartoon novel about the Reverend Jesse Custer's attempt to track down God, who has fled heaven, to ask why He has let things get into such a mess. Along the way he runs into a drunken Irishman who can't be killed but must stay out of the sunlight because it causes him to burst into flames. The writing is truely witty and contains some glorious insults and abuse. However, the volumes must be kept away from those of weak constitutions or are of a suggestive mentality; it contains some graphic violence and some of the characters are less than salubrious (their favourite reading is **** Rampage).
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Anatomy of Failure by Harlan K Ullman. The author was former USN officer who then held a number of positions doing research for the Pentagon. He appears to have been a policy advisor to a number of administrations and now does private consultancy work.

The book is divided into chapters based around the Presidencies from Kennedy onwards to Obama. It was written after Trump's win but aside from one or two references he does not look at anything substantive from the current occupant of the White House. The book is essentially looking at the strategic policy failures that have led to the US losing every substantive military confrontation it has engaged in since WW2. I am up to the conclusion of GHW Bush's administration and, ironically, it is the one that he is most complimentary of for getting the big issues right.

Also reading the collected editions of Preacher. The graphic cartoon novel about the Reverend Jesse Custer's attempt to track down God, who has fled heaven, to ask why He has let things get into such a mess. Along the way he runs into a drunken Irishman who can't be killed but must stay out of the sunlight because it causes him to burst into flames. The writing is truely witty and contains some glorious insults and abuse. However, the volumes must be kept away from those of weak constitutions or are of a suggestive mentality; it contains some graphic violence and some of the characters are less than salubrious (their favourite reading is **** Rampage).
It could be argued that the US won in Korea in the sense that it saved SK from NK at the time, and that it won the Cuban missile crisis by the timely and effective deployment of sea power, and that it won GW1 in the sense that Kuwaiti sovereignty was restored.
 
It could be argued that the US won in Korea in the sense that it saved SK from NK at the time, and that it won the Cuban missile crisis by the timely and effective deployment of sea power, and that it won GW1 in the sense that Kuwaiti sovereignty was restored.
Korea, stalemate restored after nearly having the NK out of the picture - hardly a victory.

Cuban missile crisis - you will need to read the book for the precise reasons but the argument (very basically) is that by forcing the backdown by the Russians it extended the Cold War by about 30 years. It has all to do with what Khrushchev was trying to do in Russia compared with what the US was doing viz-a-viz nuclear arms.

GW1, agreed and the author agrees with you also. As I said in my post the author regards Bush the elder with the most respect.
 
Having finished Timothy Hallinan's 'Queen of Patpong' I have moved north and I'm well into M.J. Lee's 'Death in Shanghai'. It features an English-speaking (fortunately) White Russian detective in the Shanghai Police in 1928.

death-in-shanghai-an-inspector-danilov-historical-thriller-book-1.jpg
 
image.jpeg

The Battalion by Richard W Black.
An in depth history of the 2nd Ranger btn from its activation in 1943 to its deactivation in 1945,its training and battles from Pointe de Hoc and Omaha all the way to czeckoslovakia.
Very good.
 
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