What are you reading right now?

sorry.
Issues are,
Why does he have to repent and what would be the the logic, if he believes what he writes. repentance is only valid if genuinely meant. Annecdotally the Russians have always acted barbarically as happened to my family testifies and I couldn't resist a chuckle "You wouldn't have thought the Germans lost." Viewed 70 years later-one wonders, not that they didn't lose of course- but these days with Putin knocking around it does sound a tad Phyrric. No offence. Incidentally 13th March 1945 was German Grandad's anniversary.
As an unrepentant Nazi the world would have been a better place if he had died,as for the Soviets acting like barbarians after the way the Germans treated them it's hardly surprising.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Mrs S' library book, 'Mansions of Misery' by Jerry White, 'An Autobiography of the Marshalsea'. A fascinating account (for me anyway) of what life (and, not unusually death, through disease or sometimes starvation - how does someone who's broke pay for his food?) in 18th & 19th century debtors' prisons, focusing on the Marshalsea and presenting some personal reminiscences, and accounts of (often strange) individuals committed to it, from its earliest traceable years to its closure in 1842. The sheer squalor, hardship, and crookedness of all at every level is hard to beat (and was harder still to survive).
 
You'll like this Not a lot, currently reading. Joyce's Ulysses. apparently it was the in to read when I was a kid, and I never did. Given to me by LR Junior as he couldn't "get his head round it. Gotta be said it's a tad dated now and I think you have to have a certain knowledge, but I think it's funny. Especialy with his Beieinander and Nacheinanander
I found it essential to have some Notes to read alongside - e.g. SparkNotes: Ulysses
 
I found it essential to have some Notes to read alongside - e.g. SparkNotes: Ulysses
Yep the version does have an intro, but I've decided to omit them. but I am actually into it and am just able to grasp the sentiment by various references, many of which I've vaguely heard of. If you were born in the fifties certain things still obtained. I just pissed me self over the funeral cortege and am now into the News paper production side. " In Nomine Damine". It's a pity that it's so much a book of it's time that modernists could never really grasp it.
 
I've just started a 'new' piece of fiction. I say 'new' as I have read it in the past before I realised that it was the fourth in a series. So I am re-reading it in the correct sequence.

the-queen-of-patpong.jpg
 
Christopher Brookmyre's first novel, "Quite Ugly One Morning", in paperback. Quite funny so far, but pretty bleak too.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
You'll like this Not a lot, currently reading. Joyce's Ulysses. apparently it was the in to read when I was a kid, and I never did. Given to me by LR Junior as he couldn't "get his head round it. Gotta be said it's a tad dated now and I think you have to have a certain knowledge, but I think it's funny. Especialy with his Beieinander and Nacheinanander

A version of that has sat in the loo of almost every house I’ve owned. That and Dostoyevskys’ Crime and Punishment. Two books no one ever lifted nor asked to borrow.
 
Read a bit of 1491, by Charles C. Mann but found it a bit odd. The author appears to be making a point and then goes on to contradict himself a few paragraphs on. I've chucked it for the moment.



Now reading London The Biography, by Peter Ackroyd

 
View attachment 327040

A very good read,Wurst joined the NG at 15,then the regular army before joining the 82nd Airborne,then its off to North Africa were he takes part in the Italian campaign before moving to England for D-Day and all that followed.
It was nice to see that the Second World War in Europe wasn't won exclusively by the 101st
You'd think that somebody else could have helped the Yanks liberate Europe though.
 
A version of that has sat in the loo of almost every house I’ve owned. That and Dostoyevskys’ Crime and Punishment. Two books no one ever lifted nor asked to borrow.
I read Ulysses about twenty years ago. Quite enjoyed it, Finnegan's Wake I gave up after three pages.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Bugger. And 62 is no age.

RIP
Well that’s a shock. I’ve just started to read his new book, (started las night in fact) for a review on this site. It’s the first Phillip Kerr book I’ve read and it certainly lives up to the comments I’ve read about this series on here.
If the rest of the book continues in the same vein then at least he went out on a high.
I wonder how many stories he has left unwritten?
 
Well that’s a shock. I’ve just started to read his new book, (started las night in fact) for a review on this site. It’s the first Phillip Kerr book I’ve read and it certainly lives up to the comments I’ve read about this series on here.
If the rest of the book continues in the same vein then at least he went out on a high.
I wonder how many stories he has left unwritten?
I've only read the first two, I thought his next book (the 13th) wasn't out until next month.

E2A: I was talking bollocks, Greeks Bearing Gifts is available now, as an eBook at any rate.
 
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