What are Brits suggestions; investing in this economy?

#21
Well, historically valuable tangibles have been the most secure investment if only because lots more folk start to want them, thus driving the price up.

My Noble Lord's suggestions about paintings isn't that daft when you think about it. If they're a good bet for Nazis in crumbling Berlin or tinpot dictators with the revolution at their doorstep, I can't see them being a bad bet for the rest of us. I certainly wouldn't put a single penny into the financial world at the moment and I'd be loathe to put it in ever again until I could be sure the current culprits had been strung up. It might just be business and not personal to them, but it's my savings for my old age: that's as personal as it damned well gets!
 
#22
smartascarrots said:
Well, historically valuable tangibles have been the most secure investment if only because lots more folk start to want them, thus driving the price up.

My Noble Lord's suggestions about paintings isn't that daft when you think about it. If they're a good bet for Nazis in crumbling Berlin or tinpot dictators with the revolution at their doorstep, I can't see them being a bad bet for the rest of us. I certainly wouldn't put a single penny into the financial world at the moment and I'd be loathe to put it in ever again until I could be sure the current culprits had been strung up. It might just be business and not personal to them, but it's my savings for my old age: that's as personal as it damned well gets!
To invest in the art world one must understand the art world. One must have contacts in the scene and must understand which few artists, out of the sea of dross, are worth investing in. Yes, art can be a good long term investment, but the chances of an outsider rookie making successful inroads into this fickle and closed world are slim to zero.
 
#23
Contrarian said:
smartascarrots said:
Well, historically valuable tangibles have been the most secure investment if only because lots more folk start to want them, thus driving the price up.

My Noble Lord's suggestions about paintings isn't that daft when you think about it. If they're a good bet for Nazis in crumbling Berlin or tinpot dictators with the revolution at their doorstep, I can't see them being a bad bet for the rest of us. I certainly wouldn't put a single penny into the financial world at the moment and I'd be loathe to put it in ever again until I could be sure the current culprits had been strung up. It might just be business and not personal to them, but it's my savings for my old age: that's as personal as it damned well gets!
To invest in the art world one must understand the art world. One must have contacts in the scene and must understand which few artists, out of the sea of dross, are worth investing in. Yes, art can be a good long term investment, but the chances of an outsider rookie making successful inroads into this fickle and closed world are slim to zero.
Perhaps I should cruise the local hospitals and retirement homes for dying artists? Buy that special artwork, have the artist die and its worth goes up!

Ok, that's a rather morbid way to make an investment.
 
#24
Virgil said:
Perhaps I should cruise the local hospitals and retirement homes for dying artists? Buy that special artwork, have the artist die and its worth goes up!

Ok, that's a rather morbid way to make an investment.
No worse than investing in, say, a third world tin mine. Just because you can put a name and face to the life that's blighted in the process doesn't make it any less morbid.
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#26
mac1 said:
genuine 19th century Colt percussion pistols?
Without the shadow of a doubt. See, with a recession, there is still lots of money sloshing around. But its like internet porn. The money is in the niche markets, not the panicking mainstream.

Art, antiques, drugs, jewellery, like that.
 
#27
I'd invest it all in a fully automated plant to make Muslim style grave-stones and Egyptian cotton shrouds, I don't know why, just call it a hunch!
 
#29
elovabloke said:
Mr_Deputy said:
Buy a Tory 'safe seat' currently up for grabs.
Get a Labour one - I think you'll find they are going free.
I'm not sure there is such a thing as a Labour safe seat.

Writing that's cheered me up no end. :D
 
#30
Anything that does not require oil, gas and not too much man power and is in a country that is unlikely to be invaded by the U.S.A any time soon.


Iran was full of very sexy opportunities but uncle Sam fcuked that one up.
Only in my dreams now, an office full of super models with a total months salary bill of $500, I hate Bush so much.
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#32
Virgil said:
Contrarian said:
smartascarrots said:
Well, historically valuable tangibles have been the most secure investment if only because lots more folk start to want them, thus driving the price up.

My Noble Lord's suggestions about paintings isn't that daft when you think about it. If they're a good bet for Nazis in crumbling Berlin or tinpot dictators with the revolution at their doorstep, I can't see them being a bad bet for the rest of us. I certainly wouldn't put a single penny into the financial world at the moment and I'd be loathe to put it in ever again until I could be sure the current culprits had been strung up. It might just be business and not personal to them, but it's my savings for my old age: that's as personal as it damned well gets!
To invest in the art world one must understand the art world. One must have contacts in the scene and must understand which few artists, out of the sea of dross, are worth investing in. Yes, art can be a good long term investment, but the chances of an outsider rookie making successful inroads into this fickle and closed world are slim to zero.
Perhaps I should cruise the local hospitals and retirement homes for dying artists? Buy that special artwork, have the artist die and its worth goes up!

Ok, that's a rather morbid way to make an investment.
Close, but no coconut. If an artist snuffs it, their work goes up in value. Its a dream come true. But one cannot go about looking for dying artists. Its not nice. Besides, Lucien Freud is about to go toes up. And his 'Benefits Supervisor Sleeping' just changed hands for $34 million. So we've bust your €100k budget a tad bit.

Stick 20k into buying graduate shows. You should be able to buy 4-5 for that money. Talk to the artists and make sure they plan to stay in art (and build a body of work), not go off and be a lesbian or hug trees.

The 80K? Visit galleries. Talk to people. Most people selling art are like stock brokers. Cheap scum who will sell you anything to make their comission. *******. Move on. Sooner or later you will meet somebody with a passion for art. Who knows the score. Trust them. See them OK. Offer them a percentage of the uplift. That way, they work for you.

If you cannot find such a person, PM me? I have an opportunity in molymumdenum mines. In China. Its art Jim, but not as we know it.
 
#33
Argee2007 said:
Mr_Deputy said:
thatcher cut taxes on the rich so they would invest in the UK industries and utilities. They didn't they bought shares abroad and in finance-related projects. They also invested in Asian and German cars, electrical goods etc I see that as being the seal/kybosh on the manufacturing industry here. Maybe it could be re-generated like a Phoenix (she what I did there?) * I dont know what the future will be if we only import the things we need and are willing to spend money on. I supose countries like Switzerland etc survive without a huge manufacturing base for cars etc

* Rover was temporarily bought by the Phoenix group of investors.

Rover was asset stripped by Phoenix, who took tax money as well, the stakeholders took out as much as they could (something upwards of £50 million!), paid themselves a fortune and gave themselves very nice pensions before running away very fast. If this was done in the US they would be serving 20 years apiece, in the UK they got government backing and will more than likely end up with knighthoods if they pass back 100k to the labour party coffers.
Very well put, Argee!

Litotes
 

TheIronDuke

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Book Reviewer
#34
Litotes said:
Argee2007 said:
Mr_Deputy said:
thatcher cut taxes on the rich so they would invest in the UK industries and utilities. They didn't they bought shares abroad and in finance-related projects. They also invested in Asian and German cars, electrical goods etc I see that as being the seal/kybosh on the manufacturing industry here. Maybe it could be re-generated like a Phoenix (she what I did there?) * I dont know what the future will be if we only import the things we need and are willing to spend money on. I supose countries like Switzerland etc survive without a huge manufacturing base for cars etc

* Rover was temporarily bought by the Phoenix group of investors.

Rover was asset stripped by Phoenix, who took tax money as well, the stakeholders took out as much as they could (something upwards of £50 million!), paid themselves a fortune and gave themselves very nice pensions before running away very fast. If this was done in the US they would be serving 20 years apiece, in the UK they got government backing and will more than likely end up with knighthoods if they pass back 100k to the labour party coffers.
Very well put, Argee!

Litotes
In the words of Augustus Caesar, "Caveat Muppet". Rover was raped by the unions for decades. Raped by the owners who in turn, raped a series of Governments who were gagging for it, the last being Tony.

The Blessed Maggie of the Balcony deregulated and guess what? The fucking wolves moved in.

Dont blame Phoenix. They broke no laws. Blame the people who made the laws. Step forward and take a bow, Maggie, the Trickle-down effect, Willie, Normon, Keynes, Clarke and deregulation.

Made a few quid when they flogged the water, gas, electricity and telecomms we all used to own? I wish you joy of it and I trust it will offset the negative equity on your gaff?

I'll stick to art and avoid slick twunts from the City.
 
#35
TheIronDuke said:
Litotes said:
Argee2007 said:
Mr_Deputy said:
thatcher cut taxes on the rich so they would invest in the UK industries and utilities. They didn't they bought shares abroad and in finance-related projects. They also invested in Asian and German cars, electrical goods etc I see that as being the seal/kybosh on the manufacturing industry here. Maybe it could be re-generated like a Phoenix (she what I did there?) * I dont know what the future will be if we only import the things we need and are willing to spend money on. I supose countries like Switzerland etc survive without a huge manufacturing base for cars etc

* Rover was temporarily bought by the Phoenix group of investors.

Rover was asset stripped by Phoenix, who took tax money as well, the stakeholders took out as much as they could (something upwards of £50 million!), paid themselves a fortune and gave themselves very nice pensions before running away very fast. If this was done in the US they would be serving 20 years apiece, in the UK they got government backing and will more than likely end up with knighthoods if they pass back 100k to the labour party coffers.
Very well put, Argee!

Litotes
In the words of Augustus Caesar, "Caveat Muppet". Rover was raped by the unions for decades. Raped by the owners who in turn, raped a series of Governments who were gagging for it, the last being Tony.

The Blessed Maggie of the Balcony deregulated and guess what? The fucking wolves moved in.

Dont blame Phoenix. They broke no laws. Blame the people who made the laws. Step forward and take a bow, Maggie, the Trickle-down effect, Willie, Normon, Keynes, Clarke and deregulation.

Made a few quid when they flogged the water, gas, electricity and telecomms we all used to own? I wish you joy of it and I trust it will offset the negative equity on your gaff?

I'll stick to art and avoid slick twunts from the City.
I don't disagree with your sentiments, Duke, but the Rover business happened on the Sainted Tony's watch.

Litotes
 
#36
Smack. Sweet, Mexican coal tar smack. Now that the price of wheat has made it an increasingly attactive crop in Afghanistan and given the difficulties of harvesting in a war zone, go out and invest in a 100 odd keys of Mex smack.
 

TheIronDuke

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Book Reviewer
#37
When the Titanic went down, Captain Birdseye was doing the right thing. Trying to get the Blue Riband in a ship he didnt design or build, heading for an iceberg that was always going to be there...

Rover went down on Blairs watch but bloody hell, the seeds were sown 50 years ago.

I guess my point is, if you want to make real money, creep into a job at the top of an industry about to 'downsize'. For the rest of us, buy art. Or deal drugs. At least you get to sleep at nights. And have nice things to look at.
 
#38
TheIronDuke said:
I'll stick to art and avoid slick twunts from the City.
Lots of top tips here, but the key to investing is stick to what you know: if you know about art - buy art; if you know about Mexican heroin - buy Mexican heroin; but don't make the mistake of those who jumped onto the property bandwagon when they didn't know anything about simply because everyone else told them it was a moneyspinner.

If you really don't know where to invest, your first step should be to go to your own bank's financial advisor who will determine your risk aversion. He will then advise you according to how much risk you are willing to take. The safest place at the moment for £35K+ is Northern Rock.
 
#39
Whatever you do, don't invest in a company that sponsors a club in the Premier League. Northern Rock (Newcastle), XL (WHU) and AIG (Man U) are all dodgy/out of business.
 
#40
Contrarian said:
There is $3 trillion to $5 trillion less liquidity in the system compared to this time last year. This is deflation staring us in the face. As such, it can be argued that cash is the best place to be at the moment, and that cash rich investors should wait until the bottom materialises before stepping back into the markets (easier said than done). In the Great Depression many investors misjudged the timing of the bottom.
UPDATE. The US Federal Reserve is broke.

http://www.ustreas.gov/press/releases/hp1144.htm

It was inevitable. Sadly inevitable. The printing presses are being warmed up as we speak. It's possible that we'll see a decline in the US Dollar Index (USDX) of up to fifty per cent in the next 12 months. Currently we have deflation, but it's likely that we can expect a re-inflation of the money supply in the immediate future. Along with foreign governments dumping dollar denominated bonds. The pound is not much better. Major upward inflationary pressures by Spring are possible, though don't underestimate those deflationary forces. Japan has been fighting deflation with negative interest rates for over a decade. However, the chairman of the Fed is not called 'Helicopter Ben' for nothing. The reserve status of the dollar is nearly over.

Unprecedented times.

Edited for clarity.
 

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