Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Builds Wespe Models 1/35 scale Leyland Hippo Mk II

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The Leyland Hippo Mk II was a heavy general service cargo truck used by the British Army and Royal Air Force during World War II and the immediate post-war years.


Specifications
Leyland Hippo Mk II, 1944.jpg
Leyland Hippo Mk II, 1944
TypeHeavy cargo truck
Place of originUnited Kingdom
In service1944-1950s
Used byBritish Army & Royal Air Force
WarsWorld War II
DesignerLeyland Motors
Designed1943
ManufacturerLeyland Motors
No. built≈ 1,000
VariantsMk II & Mk IIA
Mass8.3 long tons (8.4 t)
Length27 ft 3 in (8.31 m)
Width8 ft 1 in (2.46 m)
Height10 ft 11 in (3.33 m)
Crew2
EngineSix-cylinder inline Leyland L6 diesel
100 bhp (75 kW) at 1,800rpm
Payload capacity11.4 long tons (11.6 t)
Drive6x4
Transmission5F1Rx2
SuspensionLive axles on semi-elliptical multi leaf springs
Maximum speed30 mph (48 km/h)
ReferencesChris Bishop[1] & Pat Ware[2]


History

Throughout 1939 and 1940 the British Armed Forces took delivery of 330 Leyland Hippo Mk Is. Also known as the WSW17, the Hippo Mk I was a militarised version of the pre-war Leyland Hippo truck with an open military cab and body.

The Leyland Hippo Mk II was a new design by Leyland, developed as a result of the planning for D-Day, which concluded that trucks with 10 long tons (10 t) cargo capacity offered considerable logistic advantages over smaller vehicles. Design of the Hippo Mk II commenced in 1943 with production commencing in late 1944. The Hippo Mk II arrived too late to see service in the days immediately after D-Day, but roughly 1,000 were in service by VE Day and they remained in service with the British Army and the Royal Air Force into the 1950s.[

Design

The Leyland Hippo Mk II was a wheeled 6x4 truck, powered by a 100 bhp (75 kW) Leyland six-cylinder inline diesel engine, through a five-speed gearbox and two-speed auxiliary gearbox. The Hippo Mk II had a new two man enclosed steel cab with pull-down windows, the top portion of the cab could be removed to reduce the overall height for shipping. The Mk II was fitted with single tyres at the rear, the Mk IIA was fitted with narrower dual wheels at the rear, this necessitating the need to carry two spare tyres for the front and rear.

The standard general service Hippo Mk II body was a steel framed, timber well type incorporating the wheel arches which reduced the loading height, an important consideration given most of the loading and unloading was done by hand. Steel hoops and a canvas cover gave weather protection and prevented identification of the load by the enemy. Some Hippo Mk IIs were fitted with large van bodies and several with expanding bodies. The sides on the latter were split horizontally, the top half expanding up to give greater roof coverage, the bottom half down to give greater floor space, multiple vehicles could be linked together to form a consolidated workshop area. Wartime variants included; Office type, Workshop, Signals and General Officer's Accommodation. Post-war bodies included a 2,000 imp gal (9,100 l) refueller.

Part three of the Smeghead mega-vehicle build continues with Wespe's (of Rumania) version of the Leyland Hippo Mk II. Now Wespe don't go overboard on detail for their models, but what you do get is a good basic model, pre-cleaned up and ready for assembly. The fine detail is something I will add as I go.
This model was bought about three years ago and stored in a leaky old garage. The box was non existent and I found a couple of areas of damage plus a missing wheel. The wheel was no problem as I printed off a new one on the 3D printer. The immediate damage was the cross-bar on the driver's cab. Easy to solve, a simple piece of white plastic strip was added and filed to size.
The next area of damage was the towing hitch. After extensive research, I have found the design I want and will print it off tomorrow. The remaining six wheels, in true Wespe fashion, are just heavy tubes with very little detail.
IMG_20200410_185804.jpg

Once I've chamfered all of them, I'll give them a better tread detail and then spray them with primer. The good thing is, as you can see from the picture, the wheels fit snugly on top of the Vallejo model colour tops, so at least I've got somewhere to hold them while they dry.
IMG_20200410_185827.jpg

The inner cab detail is fairly good so I assembled it as per the instructions. There were no driver's pedals included in the kit, so I fabricated some using some plastic rod with pieces of plastic sheet. The two smaller pedals were given a cross-hatch design while the longer accelerator pedal was given a vertical pattern to simulate rubber grips. The seats were hand painted with chocolate brown with a dry- brush of Tamiya Dark yellow. The rest of the cab was sprayed first with grey car primer and then with Vallejo Deck Tan. The instrument panel has three holes drilled for the gauges, then a piece of acetate fixed to the back, painted black from behind. The three holes had there rims painted in bright aluminium. From a distance, they look pretty authentic. The gearstick and handbrake lever was painted black with a light dry-brushing of silver when dry.
The kit-supplied Jerrycan rack is pretty dire, being moulded in one block. I made my own with scrap plasticard and some Tamiya Jerrycans from an old accessory pack. They looked a 1,000 times better and looked the business once positioned.
More to come tomorrow. Stay safe guys and gals.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
The Leyland Hippo Mk II was a heavy general service cargo truck used by the British Army and Royal Air Force during World War II and the immediate post-war years.


Specifications
Leyland Hippo Mk II, 1944.jpg
Leyland Hippo Mk II, 1944
TypeHeavy cargo truck
Place of originUnited Kingdom
In service1944-1950s
Used byBritish Army & Royal Air Force
WarsWorld War II
DesignerLeyland Motors
Designed1943
ManufacturerLeyland Motors
No. built≈ 1,000
VariantsMk II & Mk IIA
Mass8.3 long tons (8.4 t)
Length27 ft 3 in (8.31 m)
Width8 ft 1 in (2.46 m)
Height10 ft 11 in (3.33 m)
Crew2
EngineSix-cylinder inline Leyland L6 diesel
100 bhp (75 kW) at 1,800rpm
Payload capacity11.4 long tons (11.6 t)
Drive6x4
Transmission5F1Rx2
SuspensionLive axles on semi-elliptical multi leaf springs
Maximum speed30 mph (48 km/h)
ReferencesChris Bishop[1] & Pat Ware[2]


History

Throughout 1939 and 1940 the British Armed Forces took delivery of 330 Leyland Hippo Mk Is. Also known as the WSW17, the Hippo Mk I was a militarised version of the pre-war Leyland Hippo truck with an open military cab and body.

The Leyland Hippo Mk II was a new design by Leyland, developed as a result of the planning for D-Day, which concluded that trucks with 10 long tons (10 t) cargo capacity offered considerable logistic advantages over smaller vehicles. Design of the Hippo Mk II commenced in 1943 with production commencing in late 1944. The Hippo Mk II arrived too late to see service in the days immediately after D-Day, but roughly 1,000 were in service by VE Day and they remained in service with the British Army and the Royal Air Force into the 1950s.[

Design

The Leyland Hippo Mk II was a wheeled 6x4 truck, powered by a 100 bhp (75 kW) Leyland six-cylinder inline diesel engine, through a five-speed gearbox and two-speed auxiliary gearbox. The Hippo Mk II had a new two man enclosed steel cab with pull-down windows, the top portion of the cab could be removed to reduce the overall height for shipping. The Mk II was fitted with single tyres at the rear, the Mk IIA was fitted with narrower dual wheels at the rear, this necessitating the need to carry two spare tyres for the front and rear.

The standard general service Hippo Mk II body was a steel framed, timber well type incorporating the wheel arches which reduced the loading height, an important consideration given most of the loading and unloading was done by hand. Steel hoops and a canvas cover gave weather protection and prevented identification of the load by the enemy. Some Hippo Mk IIs were fitted with large van bodies and several with expanding bodies. The sides on the latter were split horizontally, the top half expanding up to give greater roof coverage, the bottom half down to give greater floor space, multiple vehicles could be linked together to form a consolidated workshop area. Wartime variants included; Office type, Workshop, Signals and General Officer's Accommodation. Post-war bodies included a 2,000 imp gal (9,100 l) refueller.

Part three of the Smeghead mega-vehicle build continues with Wespe's (of Rumania) version of the Leyland Hippo Mk II. Now Wespe don't go overboard on detail for their models, but what you do get is a good basic model, pre-cleaned up and ready for assembly. The fine detail is something I will add as I go.
This model was bought about three years ago and stored in a leaky old garage. The box was non existent and I found a couple of areas of damage plus a missing wheel. The wheel was no problem as I printed off a new one on the 3D printer. The immediate damage was the cross-bar on the driver's cab. Easy to solve, a simple piece of white plastic strip was added and filed to size.
The next area of damage was the towing hitch. After extensive research, I have found the design I want and will print it off tomorrow. The remaining six wheels, in true Wespe fashion, are just heavy tubes with very little detail.
View attachment 464539
Once I've chamfered all of them, I'll give them a better tread detail and then spray them with primer. The good thing is, as you can see from the picture, the wheels fit snugly on top of the Vallejo model colour tops, so at least I've got somewhere to hold them while they dry.
View attachment 464541
The inner cab detail is fairly good so I assembled it as per the instructions. There were no driver's pedals included in the kit, so I fabricated some using some plastic rod with pieces of plastic sheet. The two smaller pedals were given a cross-hatch design while the longer accelerator pedal was given a vertical pattern to simulate rubber grips. The seats were hand painted with chocolate brown with a dry- brush of Tamiya Dark yellow. The rest of the cab was sprayed first with grey car primer and then with Vallejo Deck Tan. The instrument panel has three holes drilled for the gauges, then a piece of acetate fixed to the back, painted black from behind. The three holes had there rims painted in bright aluminium. From a distance, they look pretty authentic. The gearstick and handbrake lever was painted black with a light dry-brushing of silver when dry.
The kit-supplied Jerrycan rack is pretty dire, being moulded in one block. I made my own with scrap plasticard and some Tamiya Jerrycans from an old accessory pack. They looked a 1,000 times better and looked the business once positioned.
More to come tomorrow. Stay safe guys and gals.
They were in service a lot longer - I had one in my troop in 1982!
 

Daz

LE

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
They were in service a lot longer - I had one in my troop in 1982!
I'm sure there were many lingering about. A quality wagon that would go all day. Built like a brick outhouse and capable of carrying a formidable load. Probably could have done with a bit of power assisted steering, but then again, Drivers always had muscles and not brains.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
I'm sure there were many lingering about. A quality wagon that would go all day. Built like a brick outhouse and capable of carrying a formidable load. Probably could have done with a bit of power assisted steering, but then again, Drivers always had muscles and not brains.
I resemble that remark.

No power steering until Bedford TM series IIRC.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I resemble that remark.

No power steering until Bedford TM series IIRC.
I
No offence meant.

Driver's today huh? Tweren't like that in our day. If you see some of the WW2 and 50's trucks, you wonder how they steered them. Some of them are pure brutes. I remember having a cabby in a big old Leyland bus, my arms felt like lead after about half an hour!
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
I
No offence meant.

Driver's today huh? Tweren't like that in our day. If you see some of the WW2 and 50's trucks, you wonder how they steered them. Some of them are pure brutes. I remember having a cabby in a big old Leyland bus, my arms felt like lead after about half an hour!
None taken.

They were indeed tough to drive, luckily I had a bike and an FFR!
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
None taken.

They were indeed tough to drive, luckily I had a bike and an FFR!
Talking of FFR's, I would love to do a 1/35 scale Humber Snipe FFW. The nearest I've got to it is the Airfix "Monty's Humber" in 1/32 scale. I suppose a bit of ingenuity could give me the result I want.
 

Daz

LE

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Thanks for that @daz I was thinking more along the lines of this baby....
vfdzvfd.jpg

wd_LightTrucks_Humber_Snipe_PU Data_small.jpg

72552.jpg

da2bd185-97e9-46c8-af9d-f14017ed3318.jpg

8cwt_1.jpg

72552_postntyi_3.jpg

There is a company in Kent, Bull Models who do a model of this, so I may well be getting in touch with them and hopefully, parting with some folding!
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Back to the Hippo. I spent most of yesterday filling bubble holes on virtually every surface! Honestly, Wespe seriously need to look at their quality control. I did manage to get the chassis and body primed plus the tow-hitch sorted out on the printer.
Once dry, the chassis was given a coat of gunmetal grey followed by a dry brushing of steel. An additional dry-brush of black was added for depth. I sprayed the whole kit in US Olive Drab, adding in a black wash once dried. Tyres were painted in rubber black with soft grey highlights and a black wash. The complete model was then dry-brushed in natural steel, making sure none of the steel got on the woodwork! Rust effects were given by a combination of burnt orange, copper and a mix of burnt number with red and metallic grey.
IMG_20200412_203426.jpg

IMG_20200412_212933.jpg

And finally into decals and finishes. What Hippo Mk 1's weren't lost at Dunkirk, spent the rest of their war as ammunition transport in the desert. The Mk II's came out in time for D-Day, generally as heavy lifters for equipment and ammunition but also as troop transports. I decided to give mine an Engineers livery belonging to 21st Army Group. This would have been used for ferrying bridging equipment or pontoons.
IMG_20200412_220458.jpg

IMG_20200412_220547.jpg

Over to you for your perusal. Be gentle with me!
 

Latest Threads

Top