Weathers Finest

I always imagined that Navy ships would be be designed to be some of the best in the world for performance in high stormy seas, lock it down and you need to get to the fight. I found this clip on youtube:


I also watched a yank military aircraft flying through a storm in the atmosphere, i think this was it:


Any Arrse dits on bad weather apart from the army shitting in a hole whilst the weather cleaned their ass because I have had that wild camping on Skye.
 
I definitely prefer the butterscotch original.

Oh, wait, weather!...
 
That's got to be the RN version of The Sportsman's Double - getting both your sonar dome and your props some airtime on the same evolution . . .
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Fairly routine on ferries from Orkney
 
That's got to be the RN version of The Sportsman's Double - getting both your sonar dome and your props some airtime on the same evolution . . .
The ship in the first and last clip in the heavy weather is the French frigate Latouche-Tréville.
 
I always imagined that Navy ships would be be designed to be some of the best in the world for performance in high stormy seas, lock it down and you need to get to the fight. I found this clip on youtube:


I also watched a yank military aircraft flying through a storm in the atmosphere, i think this was it:


Any Arrse dits on bad weather apart from the army shitting in a hole whilst the weather cleaned their ass because I have had that wild camping on Skye.

IIRC some of the WW2 footage of ships on the Arctic Convoys make that lot look like a sunny day on a boating lake...
 
IIRC some of the WW2 footage of ships on the Arctic Convoys make that lot look like a sunny day on a boating lake...

....as Winston said "the worst journey in the world" and to the great shame of the war office- admiralty -MOD, the crews had to wait for their artic convoy medals for 70 years.
 

endure

GCM

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
One of the worst seas to Navigate ( so I am told) is the North Atlantic in wintertime
many brave Norwegians made the crossing with the Shetland Bus
bringing out those whose lives were in danger, and taking back provisions medicine and munitions
At wars end the German garrisons surrendered peacefully to a fully armed militia c/o the Shetland bus
they crossed in wooden boats 35 feet long, until the latter part of the war when they were given Naval craft
A few brave Norwegians are buried at the Kirk in Lunna Voe, many more have no grave
My late uncle, who served on the Belfast, said those men in those small fishing boats had more guts than all of the Germans put together
they could only make the crossing in winter as the German navy was kept in port and Aircraft could rarely spot them

The Shetland Bus
By David Ermine Howarth, R.N.V.R. is well worth reading
 
I have been recently watching the Smithsonian Channel a bit. They had a programme on recently about a WW2 battle in the Pacific, and were saying that the Yamamoto battleship was so heavy she was mainly underwater.
Less windage, more for the subs, I suppose.
And that’s the limit of my naval knowledge: low profile=harder to hit by conventional gunnery, more prone to torpedos. Higher profile=easier to hit by conventional gunnery, please god let the torpedo miss.
 
I have been recently watching the Smithsonian Channel a bit. They had a programme on recently about a WW2 battle in the Pacific, and were saying that the Yamamoto battleship was so heavy she was mainly underwater.
Less windage, more for the subs, I suppose.
And that’s the limit of my naval knowledge: low profile=harder to hit by conventional gunnery, more prone to torpedos. Higher profile=easier to hit by conventional gunnery, please god let the torpedo miss.
Yamato was killed by aircraft.
 
I'll just save time later and deploy my black cat now
:)
 
I stand by to be black catted by @supermatelot, but 60 knots accross the deck in Biscay in November was quite sporty, it may have been higher but we lost the anenometer, and an EPIRB. Also sailing close hauled with the spinnaker and dipping the boom in a squall in the Pacific was interesting. Clipper race 2001.
 

Issi

War Hero
I did an exchange with HMS Coventry. Passing through the Bay of Biscay was interesting, apparently they'd experienced heavier conditions on the way out to the Far East, and lost a SeaCat(iirc) launcher.
A passing Pugwash could probably confirm if this would actually have happened.
 
All the ships were old and had no or early very small bulbous nose - does that make them less bow/stern stable in rough sea?
 

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