Paint & Tools Weather or not.

I'm not an active modeller, more an admirer of the art.

One thing of which I am particularly fond, where it is appropriate, is skilful 'weathering'. Even some OEM suppliers now offer it as an option on RTR models.

Whether (weather?) it is the addition of ballast and lineside grime, rusting or oily deposits on a railway loco or the exhaust streaking around an aircraft engine cowling, it adds another dimension to the model and lifts the realism.

Some prefer their models to be in a pristine, ex-works condition. Something very rarely seen in RL.

As a guitar player, however, I find the fashionable artificial ageing (relicing) of expensive instruments to be somewhat absurd.

Any views?
 

Daz

LE
I'm not an active modeller, more an admirer of the art.

One thing of which I am particularly fond, where it is appropriate, is skilful 'weathering'. Some OEM suppliers even now offer it as an option on RTR models.

Whether (weather?) it is the addition of ballast and lineside grime, rusting or oily deposits on a railway loco or the exhaust streaking around an aircraft engine cowling, it adds another dimension to the model and lifts the realism.

Some prefer their models to be in a pristine, ex-works condition. Something very rarely seen in RL.

As a guitar player, however, I find the fashionable artificial ageing (relicing) of expensive instruments to be somewhat absurd.

Any views?
It depends, some weathering can help depending on what is being depicted, however, quite often it ends up being OTT due to whatever the current modelling trend is, hence airframes with panels lines that can be seen from outer space, depictions of rusted to fuck vehicles that have just come of landing craft at Normandy etc
 
I'm not an active modeller, more an admirer of the art.

One thing of which I am particularly fond, where it is appropriate, is skilful 'weathering'. Even some OEM suppliers now offer it as an option on RTR models.

Whether (weather?) it is the addition of ballast and lineside grime, rusting or oily deposits on a railway loco or the exhaust streaking around an aircraft engine cowling, it adds another dimension to the model and lifts the realism.

Some prefer their models to be in a pristine, ex-works condition. Something very rarely seen in RL.

As a guitar player, however, I find the fashionable artificial ageing (relicing) of expensive instruments to be somewhat absurd.

Any views?
I do like weathering, it does add to the realism of the model and what the modeller is trying to portray. Sometimes though it's over done and just looks naff.

It's like the car moding scene. I don't get some of it. The rat rod is a curiosity, some of them look good, some look crap. You can even buy paint that looks like rust :rolleyes:
 
It depends, some weathering can help depending on what is being depicted, however, quite often it ends up being OTT due to whatever the current modelling trend is, hence airframes with panels lines that can be seen from outer space, depictions of rusted to fuck vehicles that have just come of landing craft at Normandy etc
I suppose it does depend on what is being depicted, the era and the environment. I think that relates more to the level of weathering rather than to its existence at all in some form.

For example, the condition of BR locos at the end of the steam era when care and maintenance was kept to the bare minimum compared with the state of locos at the height of the period of corporate pride.

Also the condition of a saddle tank loco engaged in a colliery with a loco heading a prestige passenger service. It's a question of degree.

You can even buy paint that looks like rust

In car modding that seems as absurd to me as bashing up an expensive guitar, artificially ageing its hardware etc.

However I think that the appropriate and skilful weathering of a model is the difference between a realistic model and a toy.
 
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I suppose it does depend on what is being depicted, the era and the environment. I think that relates more to the level of weathering rather than to its existence at all in some form.

For example, the condition of BR locos at the end of the steam era when care and maintenance was kept to the bare minimum compared with the state of locos at the height of the period of corporate pride.

Also the condition of a saddle tank loco engaged in a colliery with a loco heading a prestige passenger service. It's a question of degree.



In car modding that seems as absurd to me as bashing up an expensive guitar, artificially ageing its hardware etc.

However I think that the appropriate weathering of a model is the difference between a model and a toy.
Yeah I suppose it's all about context really. Also getting the weathering balance right.
 
I recently posted a photo of a 1/48 chipmunk in FAC camouflage colours which looked like it had done the BoB and Stalingrad back-to-back. The actual a/c was painted in gloss epoxy and would have been immaculate.
6B451C41-EFAB-4FE9-8B5B-2828FDE1FF94.jpeg

I’m also not a big fan of the deeply accentuated shadows, highlights and creases which were (and still are in some quarters) de rigeur in the 70s, particularly on Napoleonic figures.
 

Daz

LE
Yeah I suppose it's all about context really. Also getting the weathering balance right.
Or indeed, the right weathering, rust on non-metallic parts, or in a desert environment is just plain wrong, however, its still seen on a large number of models
 
I’m also not a big fan of the deeply accentuated shadows, highlights and creases which were (and still are in some quarters) de rigeur in the 70s, particularly on Napoleonic figures.

I can picture exactly what you mean. I think that sort of thing owed more to comic book virtualisation rather than anything RL.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
There was a fad a while back for "high contrast" faces etc on figures, to me, it made them look like porcelain statuettes rather than people. Thankfully, it seems to have died a death.
 
I think the trouble a lot of modellers have is thinking of weathering as a effect they think about last, when they've made a bog standard model and think weathering will enhance the look of the finished model and feel a little let down by the end product. Weathering should be considered before the first two parts are joined together. Especially if weathering involves peeling paint, ground in dirt on the interior, deep down engine bay oil and grease stains. And bare metal rarely looks silver and bright, more dark brown, Weathering from imagination hardly ever produces the result that you expect.

Never heard of this musical Instrument weathering before, is that to make the Musician look like he or she has been using it for longer and are therefore more experienced than they actually are. A bit like making stuff up on a CV?
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
@Simmerit and @Dads203 can probably hold forth here.

What annoys is the almost model-as-art thing which is seen to represent reality.

Most vehicles were/are relatively well-maintained, even in wartime. An Allied vehicle going into Normandy on 6 June 1944 would have been fresh, for instance, and a layer of dust would suffice.

Even vehicles that had been hammered rather more are nowhere near as weathered as many modellers seem to think necessary - not 'live' ones; the standard seems to be to have a crew on a vehicle which approximates something that was put in place as a gate guardian 20 years ago and which has never been looked after since.

The other nonsense, which seems to have receded from a height of absurdity a few years ago, is the addition of massively over-scale weld seams. The 'realistic' seams that some modellers were adding wouldn't survive a few miles on a bumpy road, let alone being hit by a round or two.
 

Simmerit

War Hero
@Simmerit and @Dads203 can probably hold forth here.

What annoys is the almost model-as-art thing which is seen to represent reality.

Most vehicles were/are relatively well-maintained, even in wartime. An Allied vehicle going into Normandy on 6 June 1944 would have been fresh, for instance, and a layer of dust would suffice.

Even vehicles that had been hammered rather more are nowhere near as weathered as many modellers seem to think necessary - not 'live' ones; the standard seems to be to have a crew on a vehicle which approximates something that was put in place as a gate guardian 20 years ago and which has never been looked after since.

The other nonsense, which seems to have receded from a height of absurdity a few years ago, is the addition of massively over-scale weld seams. The 'realistic' seams that some modellers were adding wouldn't survive a few miles on a bumpy road, let alone being hit by a round or two.


tricky one really I suppose. I studied stacks of piccies of Skyraiders before tackling this which I did actually finish.

BB67FE93-1DC1-4F8E-B972-C1570D422E32.jpeg


I’ve got half a dozen panzers that are near to weathering but I keep starting new ones before finishing the old ones. Dads is yr man for panzer weathering - he does actually finish them.

Some of the Russian Ts look like they have had a proper hammering, but it’s seriously muddy out there.

Most of the models I see are dire apart from in our forum where people have used the kit. i think overdone stuff looks daft.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
tricky one really I suppose. I studied stacks of piccies of Skyraiders before tackling this which I did actually finish.

View attachment 660641

I’ve got half a dozen panzers that are near to weathering but I keep starting new ones before finishing the old ones. Dads is yr man for panzer weathering - he does actually finish them.

Some of the Russian Ts look like they have had a proper hammering, but it’s seriously muddy out there.

Most of the models I see are dire apart from in our forum where people have used the kit. i think overdone stuff looks daft.
Aye, but to quote one of your posts during that build, "These things were proper minging."

There was nothing on that which was out of place/OTT.

(There's a good home here for either of them if you ever get bored...)
 
looking at Pictures taken at the time by Armed Forces phots and others, can give a better idea of what weathering really looks like.
like the exhaust deposits on an old Lanc wing
wartime lanc image.jpg

or ground in weathering that has taken hours of flight and hard service to accumulate.
yellow bi plane weathering.jpg

not all modern hi tech kit is clean and spotless.
underside of jet fighter weathering.jpg
 
One way of looking at it is that some/most modellers like to show off, the model is the canvas and they like to throw the bucket at it, every trick and technique in the book just to show and prove that they have the skill.
It’s not necessarily accurate or even real looking in my honest opinion but a way of getting across that they can do all the fashionable weathering bits n bobs In one build.

I personally like to spend a bit of time and really study what I’m about to throw together and actually think about the way I’m going to weather it all up, will it be believable?
Find a good picture quality of what you are building in the environment you are going to portray and start from that, most of us here in this here forum have all served in some capacity so we know how our kit was looked after and how it looked after a week or two in the field, it’s just a case of translating it to the build you are working on.

I’ll just say that all the techniques have a place when it comes to modelling, it’s just knowing when to stop and when to employ it, less is more in most cases.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
One way of looking at it is that some/most modellers like to show off, the model is the canvas and they like to throw the bucket at it, every trick and technique in the book just to show and prove that they have the skill.
It’s not necessarily accurate or even real looking in my honest opinion but a way of getting across that they can do all the fashionable weathering bits n bobs In one build.

I personally like to spend a bit of time and really study what I’m about to throw together and actually think about the way I’m going to weather it all up, will it be believable?
Find a good picture quality of what you are building in the environment you are going to portray and start from that, most of us here in this here forum have all served in some capacity so we know how our kit was looked after and how it looked after a week or two in the field, it’s just a case of translating it to the build you are working on.

I’ll just say that all the techniques have a place when it comes to modelling, it’s just knowing when to stop and when to employ it, less is more in most cases.
You diplomat, you.
 
Scanning through my photo album for stuff from "that time" sometimes inadvertently brings up weathering, Here's my old mate Joe in front of a very BATUS India Seven one Bravo.
Joe Soaper.jpg

Weathering can sometimes be difficult to explain, like the dust streaks down the side of this CR1
ammo dump cat 87.jpg

Peacetime British AFVs are well maintained, washed off regularly, and get a good dusting from time to time.
back of the throat dust.jpg
 
I'm not an active modeller, more an admirer of the art.

One thing of which I am particularly fond, where it is appropriate, is skilful 'weathering'. Even some OEM suppliers now offer it as an option on RTR models.

Whether (weather?) it is the addition of ballast and lineside grime, rusting or oily deposits on a railway loco or the exhaust streaking around an aircraft engine cowling, it adds another dimension to the model and lifts the realism.

Some prefer their models to be in a pristine, ex-works condition. Something very rarely seen in RL.

As a guitar player, however, I find the fashionable artificial ageing (relicing) of expensive instruments to be somewhat absurd.

Any views?
Agree.

If a model is for demonstration purposes then clean is fine, otherwise it should be telling a story and that can be done through ageing, weathering and situational treatments etc...

Relicing guitars - yeah, so dumb, and people pay more for it - so very dumb. An instrument should tell it's own story. It's basically hipster shit of the musical world.
 
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