wearing of medal ribbon at formal dinners

#1
lo , sorry if this isnt the right place to ask but I'm at a total loss.

I have a non military medal ( queens jubilee medal) and have absolutely no idea of any time I am likely to wear it as i dont attend many royal functions :) (any)

I also have the ribbon bar/badge and am assuming that you might wear that on a non royal occasion rather than the medal.

Is it appropriate to wear the ribbon at a formal dinner I.E when wearing black jacket / bow tie ? Also is it appropriate to wear the ribbon at weddings and funerals.

All the guidence I have found states when to wear the actual medal but not the ribbon so I'm wondering if wearing the ribbon is more of a self judged thing or if there are set times, I wouldnt want to be rude in any way and at the same time think it is appropriate to wear it when you should.

Any help or who to ask would be appreciated.

thanks

Mas
 
#2
The ribbon is to be sewn above the left pocket of a dress uniform of members of the armed forces, police fire brigade etc.

You may purchase a miniature medal to wear on a dinner jacket at a formal dinner when decorations are worn.

Why were you awarded a jubilee medal?
 
#3
Hi, thanks for that I have the ribbon bar which you pin on a jacket rather than sew I assume thats O.K.

It was the QE2 Golden Jubilee Medal which was given to members of the armed forces in my case Police. I have been offered no guidence on it's 'use' at all in typically non helpfull managenet fashion no-one seems to know nor care.

What i mean tis , rather than when you wear a medal or minature , there must be a time when you wear just the ribbon , I know that on the old police uniform when there were tunics ( in the good old days lol) , officers used to wear them on duty but there are no longer tunics worn.
I have also seen medal ribbons worn at funerals.
 
#4
The normal rule is that for formal occasions calling for dress uniform or black tie, medals will be worn. On dress uniform the full size medal can either be normal or court mounted. It is also the case that the ribbon is stitched onto the dress uniform and the actual medals mounted on a big pin attached through v. small 'hoops' of material sewn onto the uniform above the ribbon. Hence, if you are not at a formal function calling for medals, your ribbons are visible. Formal occasions include weddings, funerals, parades, etc, and somewhere will be an order specifying in detail the dress to be worn.

For mess kit or DJ, where it says medals will be worn, it means miniatures [again normal or court mounted]. There are no miniature ribbons. For black tie events, check with the organiser whether or not medals are to be worn.

Hope that helps...

Fullwit
 
#6
on another note,

on what occasions would it be appropriate to wear a Dress uniform ie No2s
as far as i know weddings, funerals, christenings, parades, visting royal personages, mess functions and inspections are OK
is there any occasions where it is appropriate to wear it that i have fogotten , please add to the list.

Court mounted medals V normal medals, which is appropriate for what occasions ?

No2s V Mess Dress , i have heard of occasions were a member of the mess is unable to obtain a mess dress, is it ok for them to wear a No2 ?

i was invited to an end of course formal dinner a while back, the invitation reads "Mess dress, No2s or suits to be worn".

why is a Mess Dress so bloody expensive ?
 
#7
mastie said:
Hi, thanks for that I have the ribbon bar which you pin on a jacket rather than sew I assume thats O.K.

It was the QE2 Golden Jubilee Medal which was given to members of the armed forces in my case Police. I have been offered no guidence on it's 'use' at all in typically non helpfull managenet fashion no-one seems to know nor care.

What i mean tis , rather than when you wear a medal or minature , there must be a time when you wear just the ribbon , I know that on the old police uniform when there were tunics ( in the good old days lol) , officers used to wear them on duty but there are no longer tunics worn.
I have also seen medal ribbons worn at funerals.
A lot of bobbies at my nick wear the ribbon on their tie as a tie decoration, alongside the police long service ribbon.
 
#8
G3Ops

That's a new one on me - court mounted medals awarded in court. I was taught that the difference was purely in style of mounting, ie with a strip of ribbon right down to the base of the gong. HM never awarded campaign medals in court, yet it is accepted style to court mount them...
 
#9
Fullwit said:
G3Ops

That's a new one on me - court mounted medals awarded in court. I was taught that the difference was purely in style of mounting, ie with a strip of ribbon right down to the base of the gong. HM never awarded campaign medals in court, yet it is accepted style to court mount them...
What I was told anyway

If it's just a mounting thing then why not call them "pretty - with a strip down the back - mounted" would make sense as opposed to picking a random word like "court"................then again, as I'm quoting 3rd hand info I could be wrong

Our corps decided that court-mounting was pish and so we all had them re-mounted at private expense.

They then decided that loose hanging was pish......so we all had them re-mounted at private expense.

at 50-odd squid a shout.....I'm waiting for the new pish policy with baited breath and cheque book :D
 
#10
G3Ops said:
Fullwit said:
G3Ops

That's a new one on me - court mounted medals awarded in court. I was taught that the difference was purely in style of mounting, ie with a strip of ribbon right down to the base of the gong. HM never awarded campaign medals in court, yet it is accepted style to court mount them...
What I was told anyway :roll:

If it's just a mounting thing then why not call them "pretty - with a strip down the back - mounted" would make sense as opposed to picking a random word like "court"................then again, as I'm quoting 3rd hand info I could be wrong :wink:

Our corps decided that court-mounting was pish and so we all had them re-mounted at private expense.

They then decided that loose hanging was pish......so we all had them re-mounted at private expense.

at 50-odd squid a shout.....I'm waiting for the new pish policy with baited breath and cheque book :D
May turn out to be cheaper to have two sets?? :) Court mounted is much more sexy...
 
#11
All further confused by some people, to my recollection, referring to court mounting as "cork" mounting. Does anyone still say that, or am I just deaf? :wink: Seems to be one of those things like referring to a "roster" as a "roaster".
 
#12
I just want to state the case as to when medals are worn:

JSP 336 Vol 12 Part 03 - Clothing Pam 10 Section 1

WEARING THE INSIGNIA OF ORDERS, DECORATIONS AND MEDALS

213. When Worn.

The insignia of Orders, Decorations and Medals are to be worn on the following occasions:

a. State occasions.
b. Royal occasions.
c. Guards in London.
d. Military funerals and connected memorial services.
e. Courts-martial.
f. Guards on Royal residencies.
g. Guards of honour.
h. Guards in Edinburgh.
i. Ceremonial and Sovereign’s parades.
j. Parades incorporating a religious service.
k. As specifically ordered.
Great - nothing new here I suspect. However, let's dive beneath the skin - as ever, the devil is in the detail:

216. When Awards are not Worn.

Orders, Decorations and Medals are not to be worn:

a. On greatcoats.
b. When attending an Investiture.
c. When attending Royal garden parties.
d. When attending parades or ceremonies as a spectator unless ordered to wear them.
e. On operational or protective clothing.
Additionally:

218. Miniatures.

Miniature Decorations and Medals are only to be worn in No 10 Dress, No 11 Dress and Evening Dress as described in Annex B to Section 3 of this regulation.
For those who didn't know, No 10 dress is 'temperate mess dress and No 11 dress is 'warm weather mess dress'.

So you can wear your miniatures as long it is one of those events detailed above - or you have been so ordered to do! :D
 
#13
Incidentally (way off topic) I used to have a Sergeant Major who would write statements like 'we will be moving from No 7 Dress to No 13 Dress wef tomorrow am' on P1Os and then wonder why no-one was properly dressed.

Knob.
 
#14
A practical point on the issue of court vs swing mounting.

Whilst you still have the chance, take a look at the WW1 Victory Medal which was produced in yellow bronze.

Every one I have seen that is swing mounted is also battered to fcuk because of the cheap manufacturing process...which brings me on to my favourite make of chocolate coin!

If you have more than just the QGJM, my advice is to get them court mounted before the other medal(s) gang up on it and kick 2 microns of sh*t off it!

Hope this helps,
Sticky :D
 
#15
stickybomb said:
If you have more than just the QGJM, my advice is to get them court mounted...shit quality...etc
Sticky is right - and it just looks better!

Also from JSP 336 Vol 12 Part 03 - Clothing Pam 10 Section 1:

COURT MOUNTING OF MEDALS

210. Policy.

Medals may be court mounted at private expense. In the interest of uniformity, the policy for court mounting in units will be left at the discretion of regiments and corps.

211. Method of Court Mounting Full Size Medals.

A backing of buckram 69.85 mm deep by width required, depending on the number of Medals. Medal ribbons should be placed side by side up to and including a quantity of 6 Medals. Thereafter, ribbons should be overlapped, with the senior ribbons nearest the centre of the chest being left fully exposed. The overlap of ribbons will vary depending on the number of Medals worn and the size of the individual’s chest. At no time should more than two-thirds of any ribbon be covered by another; the overlap of each ribbon should be equal. The Medal is suspended from a ribbon so as to allow the centre of a round Medal to be cut in half by the backing, i.e. the nose of the impression of a sovereign’s head on a Medal should rest on the bottom edge of the backing. The overall length of a suspended Medal will be 88.9 mm. No Medal should be suspended from less than 31.74 mm of Medal riband; in the case of a larger Order, Decoration or Medal, the backing may be increased to 76.2 mm depth to allow a minimum of 31.74 mm of riband suspending the Medal. A standard issue Medal brooch should be sewn to the back of the buckram. The back overall should be covered by a black face cloth or doeskin, with the exception of the Guards Division, whose Medals are backed with scarlet. Medals are sewn down with a neutral coloured thread. When mounted, the bottom edges of the Medals, regardless of their size, should be level.
Fancy some 'cut n paste' action - you know who to call! :D
 
#16
Calypso said:
stickybomb said:
If you have more than just the QGJM, my advice is to get them court mounted...s*** quality...etc
Sticky is right - and it just looks better!

Also from JSP 336 Vol 12 Part 03 - Clothing Pam 10 Section 1:

COURT MOUNTING OF MEDALS

210. Policy.

Medals may be court mounted at private expense. In the interest of uniformity, the policy for court mounting in units will be left at the discretion of regiments and corps.

211. Method of Court Mounting Full Size Medals.

A backing of buckram 69.85 mm deep by width required, depending on the number of Medals. Medal ribbons should be placed side by side up to and including a quantity of 6 Medals. Thereafter, ribbons should be overlapped, with the senior ribbons nearest the centre of the chest being left fully exposed. The overlap of ribbons will vary depending on the number of Medals worn and the size of the individual’s chest. At no time should more than two-thirds of any ribbon be covered by another; the overlap of each ribbon should be equal. The Medal is suspended from a ribbon so as to allow the centre of a round Medal to be cut in half by the backing, i.e. the nose of the impression of a sovereign’s head on a Medal should rest on the bottom edge of the backing. The overall length of a suspended Medal will be 88.9 mm. No Medal should be suspended from less than 31.74 mm of Medal riband; in the case of a larger Order, Decoration or Medal, the backing may be increased to 76.2 mm depth to allow a minimum of 31.74 mm of riband suspending the Medal. A standard issue Medal brooch should be sewn to the back of the buckram. The back overall should be covered by a black face cloth or doeskin, with the exception of the Guards Division, whose Medals are backed with scarlet. Medals are sewn down with a neutral coloured thread. When mounted, the bottom edges of the Medals, regardless of their size, should be level.
Fancy some 'cut n paste' action - you know who to call! :D
...and if anyone has a handy-dandy way of cleaning court mounted medals without getting Duraglit snot or whatever over the ribbons, there's a pint of Guinness extra cold and a pork pie available from this callsign for the information.

Glad_its_only_once_a_year
 
#18
At the risk of attracting shouts of 'Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!' I always use a cotton bud, a dab of Duraglit and lots of love.

Cheers. :D
 
#20
Calypso said:
At the risk of attracting shouts of 'Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!' I always use a cotton bud, a dab of Duraglit and lots of love.

Cheers. :D
Thanks very much, didn't even occur to me there was a potential wah in that :D
 

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