Wearing DPM for civvy shooting?

#1
I’m fairly new to the civvy club shooting scene, but have been surprised at the amount and variety of DPM and military equipment / clothing in use. No doubt there are some plausible reasons for having and using such kit; in the right circumstances it could even be considered ally, but I suspect there are some Waltish tendencies on display as well.

I wouldn’t want to think someone a tw@t when he’s actually sound – or vice versa, so I tried to think of some rules of thumb, I’m sure that Arrsers can come up with some more:

- Any current or recent UK pattern kit (bought, not issued) = possibly Walting it
- Overseas or limited issue UK, acquired in the course of your work (with good story) = Ally potential
- Anyone under 12 years of age = fine, they’ll probably join up in due course so might as well start now

Any suggestions for the worst case of overdoing it with the DPM? Remember, we’re talking about real guns here, used for the purpose of making small holes in bits of paper some distance away – not Airsoft or other such genuinely Walt-attracting hobbies.
 
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PrinceAlbert

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#2
How can you over-do DPM when shooting?? Perhaps you should rock up to your next stalk wearing nothing but dayglo orange?

Are you really that stupid as to ask why they're all wearing DPM??
 
#3
PrinceAlbert said:
How can you over-do DPM when shooting?? Perhaps you should rock up to your next stalk wearing nothing but dayglo orange?

Are you really that stupid as to ask why they're all wearing DPM??
It's not that they have to conceal themselves for a piece of paper in the distance is it?

I'd say they're walting the place up.
 
#4
PrinceAlbert said:
How can you over-do DPM when shooting?? Perhaps you should rock up to your next stalk wearing nothing but dayglo orange?

Are you really that stupid as to ask why they're all wearing DPM??
Dayglo orange wasn't a problem in this case.
 

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PrinceAlbert

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#5
Cloggie said:
PrinceAlbert said:
How can you over-do DPM when shooting?? Perhaps you should rock up to your next stalk wearing nothing but dayglo orange?

Are you really that stupid as to ask why they're all wearing DPM??
It's not that they have to conceal themselves for a piece of paper in the distance is it?

I'd say they're walting the place up.
You'll also find that some people are on the point to get their rifle dialled in for when they go stalking, and for rifle practice. Why wear something that you wouldn't go hunting in?
 
#6
Having shot for over 30 years now civy and military, I’d say that the reason is that it is generally designed as proper outdoor clothing: hardwearing, can be bought relatively cheaply and you’re not too worried about rolling around in the mud with it.

Don’t wear it myself due to still serving, but I haven’t met anybody trying to walt it up – just wearing sensible clothing.
 
#7
There is a sort of dividing line between people who walt it up a bit (trying to look like 1970s SAS vets complete with twat cap and combat boots) and the majority who just wear DPM as cheap suitable clothing.

Many shooters try and get hold of a sniper smock - its really a perfect UK shooting range jacket. I don't really see a problem with that.

My club has lots of genuine serving reg/TA members, as well as a few vets and a few walts. We all ignored the NRA comments about DPM, and I don't think anyone feels "mixed uniform" is an issue.
 
#8
Only an utter cad and bounder would go shooting in anything other than subdued tweed or loden except in the tropics where one might wear khaki drill.
 
#9
In the context of Civilian Service Rifle shot with the NRA this one has been thrashed out over the last ten years; and to fair I think a lot of shooters bought it upon themselves after the pistol ban using the supposed ruling as victim status!

The 2009 Bisley Bible states for Civilian Service Rifle:

"The wearing of the UK military issue sniper smock is allowed"

Even I was taken in with this until about a year ago Martin Farnam (Late NRA!) said it wasn't an issue except if somebody was head to toe in DPM and trying to pass himself off as serving.
If you are shooting .303 or 7.62m and getting through 180 rounds in one competition it is not unreasonable to wear something more attuned to the discipline you are doing.
As 4T says above (we belong to the same club) there are serving, ex regs, TA and walts, you can smell the walts at 30 paces!
 
#10
galgenberg said:
Only an utter cad and bounder would go shooting in anything other than subdued tweed or loden except in the tropics where one might wear khaki drill.
Henry on the right with some bounder on the left.
 

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#11
I wear DPM when fishing. Having left some 8 years ago, I suppose I am a fishing walt...........................by the way, it was /-------------------------this big-----------------------------------------/


FFS, dpm is gererally hard wearing, comfortable gear. Lests not confuse walting with economic sense. Walting generally implies someone pretending to be something they are not. Were the 'walts' in question pretending to be anything other that civvy shooters?
 
#12
I think it's just a question of not going completely 'over the top' in terms of wearing DPM in order to try and give an impression of being a serving soldier.

Having said that where I shoot whatever you wear needs to be hard wearing and waterproof and preferably cheap because of the amount time spent lying down in a soggy mix of mud and sheepsh1t so army surplus fits the bill. Many of the ppl I shoot with are former regs or TA.

My personal preference is to not wear British DPM as I'm no longer a STAB and I just wear some old american green or sand coloured BDUs and a civvy fleece plus some cheapo German flectarn waterproofs if it's p1$$ing down (which it usually is).
 
#13
The idea of spending good money on clothing to use when shooting seems a bit daft when considerable clothing is probably available to most of the members of this site through buckshee or excess after having left the service.

My 'buckshee' gets considerable use during the shooting season as it is light weight, hard wearing and was incredibly cheap, (well cost me about 10 years of my life). Why not use it.

The only problem I have found with it so far is the CS95 jacket for whatever reason gets the partridges agitated in their pens during the rearing season. Pheasants don't seem to give a flying f**k about it.

Many of the beaters on the shoot have acquired many pieces of my excess over the years and I would not call any of them walts, most just appreciate kit that is designed for use in the field and will stand up to the job.........

Is it wrong, hell no, and I shall keep using it. Although badges, rank etc are no longer there, the clothing is......

Edited for fat finger mong spelling efforts.....
 
#15
Henry_Tombs said:
galgenberg said:
Only an utter cad and bounder would go shooting in anything other than subdued tweed or loden except in the tropics where one might wear khaki drill.
Henry on the right with some bounder on the left.
at least the rum cove is not wearing Para major's rank slides with RAF eagle patches over the breast pockets like the angler I met on the canal near Shugborough? (WTF was that all about?)

Well done to you on maintaining standards!!!
 
#16
I have a DPM jacket I use in winter for BP shooting, goes nicely over a thick jumper, has a bazillion pockets for all the bits I need and it doesn't matter when it gets covered in patch grease, cleaning sovent, soot or potentially catches fire.
 
#17
Interesting responses, and I stand corrected. My inspiration for the post was the sight on the ranges of more than one individual with weapons that you'd never use against anything other than paper yet wearing brand new C95 and similar (and/or surplus with the badges still on it).

Certainly agree wholeheartedly with those who use the ranges to supplement their main shooting in the field - makes absolute sense to zero in the kit you're going to be hunting in. Personally, I prefer to hunt in subdued civvy outdoor kit - where I live you do encounter dog walkers and horse riders, and I don't want to frighten the locals by looking like an escapee from one of the local mil training areas.
 
#18
Just to flog the dead horse here:

cheap -- hard wearing -- don't care if it gets covered in kak -- lots of pockets

a while back I tried to get some non-camouflage clothing for shooting, but it was far more expensive.
 
#19
You can tell by the way a jacket etc is worn whether or not someone has done time in or not. Never fails and it's always backed up by the accent and lingo the wearer uses or doesn't. Anyone wearing something with a with a badge on it is definately a Walt - even if it's only sub consciously. WE all know that. But what harm do they do. As soon as you ask them about their unit they start apologising. I like doing that !

It's good, cheap and practical clothing whether you are ex or not and no more the preserve of current servers than a football or rugby shirt is wrong on a supporter.

Personally I use my old Denison. Gets me all nostaglic :) Do I care what people think ? Do I bollox. It's often a good conversation opener .

D_B
 
#20
Just by coincidence: have just walked through my local town centre and seen a womens' clothes shop displaying a fashion blouse in desert DPM! "Walt fashion" must be the current thing....
 
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