Weapons surrendered to SAA in Damascus -


Posting here rather than in the Syria thread as the interest is in the older weapons: Carl Gustav, M1919, MG34, Sten, Maxim (unsure of type - comments welcome), bolt action rifles at 1.17 (id welcome), etc.

IMG_20180511_213729.jpg
 
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there's some serious ingenuity in those improvised mortars! some of the bombs appear to be reused gas bottles or fire extinguishers or bits of drain pipe and there's at least one aircraft machine gun in there.
 
Bolt action on the left is a Mauser GEW 98 ? on the right is a Man Licker ( giggle ) Carcano ?


Russian full house, DP , RPK, RPD, PKM, DSHK, KPV, SVD...

Something very wrong with the PKM behind the KPV, the stock and pistol grip are too far back, looks like a diy job ?
 
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In the video I thought I saw a Polish PM-63 or PM-84 SMG.

There are also what I think may be some Milkor MGL grenade launchers in the photo, but the stock looks different from what I have seen before. The other features however match the Milkor better than other equivalents. Someone better informed may have a different opinion.

One of the rifles does look like a Carcano, as noted by another poster above.
 
Bottom pic, under the telescope... I'm... nearly.... thERRRRRRRRRRE!


Ahhhhhhhhhh. Gimmie 20 minutes petal and I'll fix you.
 

Posting here rather than in the Syria thread as the interest is in the older weapons: Carl Gustav, M1919, MG34, Sten, Maxim (unsure of type - comments welcome), bolt action rifles at 1.17 (id welcome), etc.

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The Multiple Grenade Launchers look like: Multiple Grenade Launcher RBG-6 cal. 40x46mm - Madlerd Ltd. Difficult to tell from the camera angle.

E2A: Reports of RBG6 in use in Aleppo by ‘rebels’:
Ahrar al-sham fighter in southern #aleppo seen with a croatian rbg-6 multiple grenade launcher. #syria - scoopnest.com

And again: Serbian & Croatian 40mm Grenade Launchers in Syria - The Firearm Blog
RBG-6-Ahrar-al-Sham.jpg

IRIA - ISIS Weapons and Ammunitions
 
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In the video I thought I saw a Polish PM-63 or PM-84 SMG.

There are also what I think may be some Milkor MGL grenade launchers in the photo, but the stock looks different from what I have seen before. The other features however match the Milkor better than other equivalents. Someone better informed may have a different opinion.

One of the rifles does look like a Carcano, as noted by another poster above.
With regards to my previous post, here's a photo of a Milkor grenade launcher with the same style of stock. The other key key features seem to match pretty well, so I would put this one as pretty certain.


800px-Milkor_GL.jpg
 
With regards to my previous post, here's a photo of a Milkor grenade launcher with the same style of stock. The other key key features seem to match pretty well, so I would put this one as pretty certain.


800px-Milkor_GL.jpg

Replying to myself yet again, according to Wikipedia, the Milkor MGL is used by a number of different countries, and built under license by at least five others.

Neither Syria nor Iraq are listed as users. However rather interestingly, Turkey is listed as being one of the countries that manufactures it under license and the only country in the region that either uses it or makes it. That in itself isn't definitive as to the source, but it is an interesting possibility to think about.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Probably handed most of those over because they couldn't get the ammo for them!
 
Probably handed most of those over because they couldn't get the ammo for them!
True. As is now quite widely known, the rebels found a lot of Stg44 at the start of the SCW. They were seen in use in the early fighting but it seems the stock of ammunition ran out. Quite a few were found, having been abandoned, when Aleppo fell to the govt. If Syria could export weapons to the US, the Stg would be a small gold mine for them.
 
True. As is now quite widely known, the rebels found a lot of Stg44 at the start of the SCW. They were seen in use in the early fighting but it seems the stock of ammunition ran out. Quite a few were found, having been abandoned, when Aleppo fell to the govt. If Syria could export weapons to the US, the Stg would be a small gold mine for them.
In the videos where we saw the various rebels being relocated, each man was allowed to keep one rifle or pistol (but not both) and three magazines. These were to be for self defence when arriving at the new location (evidently they didn't trust their fellow rebels).

Everything else had to be left behind. Hence, we see a lot of heavy weapons, machine guns, RPGs, grenades, etc., but comparatively fewer rifles or SMGs and many of those being old or use harder to get ammunition. The most desirable rifles or pistols probably got taken along with the departing rebels.
 
True. As is now quite widely known, the rebels found a lot of Stg44 at the start of the SCW. They were seen in use in the early fighting but it seems the stock of ammunition ran out. Quite a few were found, having been abandoned, when Aleppo fell to the govt. If Syria could export weapons to the US, the Stg would be a small gold mine for them.
https://www.gunbroker.com/item/769638398
Not sure about ‘small gold mine’ but $1200 isn’t loose change either. Selling 50 at bulk, maybe $8-900 each depending on quality

Edit: Seen, another .22RF one. The originals apparently worth a lot more. $60-90k for one with the Krummlauf: Rock Island Auction: German STG-44 Assault Rifle WWII Original
 
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https://www.gunbroker.com/item/769638398
Not sure about ‘small gold mine’ but $1200 isn’t loose change either. Selling 50 at bulk, maybe $8-900 each depending on quality


The only reason they're worth that sort of amount is because of their rarity value in the USA, or most other Western countries, due to the import restrictions and sane governments' preference for turning them into ferrous scrap to stop them getting into irresponsible hands. The reality is that they're 70+ year old military hardware that was probably knackered when the original owners discarded them and they haven't been well cared for since then.

I'd cheerfully tip the whole lot into a smelter.

And the person who had the bright idea of assembling that quantity of explosive ammunition, of dubious age and provenance, in neat lines for a photo opportunity should be stoned.
 
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Chef

LE
My first thought was somebody had to lay it all out and then pick it all up again. Someone who's upset the local Q bloke I guess.

I agree with @Onetap I doubt the ammo'explosives has led a sheltered life up till now and as for the homemade stuff. Well.
 
Unbelievable, must have not had any ammo if they didn't win with one of these in their armoury.

1zmyvwp.jpg
 
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