Weapon System Names

#1
I was thinking about the SA80 and L85 M911 etc and then some more Ally names such as the Raptor, Tornado or the more mundane Meteor, Javelin, Uzi etc.

British Aircraft names after weather systems traditionally, but then we have a Hawk and Jaguar. We have the Challenger (odd name?) and all sorts of other things have names whereas some have numbers.

What is the criteria for naming a weapon system, why did we get Rapier and yet the S/A-6 (I don’t know) is numbered?
 
#2
What is the criteria for naming a weapon system, why did we get Rapier and yet the S/A-6 (I don’t know) is numbered?
SA6, is called GAINFUL, by NATO. It's called, I think, KUB, by the opposition.
So as I'm struggling to work out what your point is, is it safe to assume that this is a beer related question?
 
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Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#3
#4
As to tanks, we seemed to hit on a "C" theme a while ago Crusader, Cromwell, Churchill, Comet, Centurion, Chieftain,
Then the next MBT procured for the British Army must surely be the FV4040 Cunt Mk1...?!!
 
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#5
I think it is random, with some attempts to impose order. As Fang says, tanks have names starting with C. Guns had clerical names for a time: Priest, Sexton, Bishop, Abbot. For a time in the 50/60s there were names combining a colour and another word: Blue Steel and Green Mace are examples, these wwwwwere the project names taken from random lists, a bit like Op names. Acronyms have also featured, Cobra for example
 
#6
The C in UK tanks names stood for "Cruiser" tank.

The NATO reporting name system for Soviet/Russian kit is a lot easier than trying to remember the Russian numbers and for NATO's many members to use. It also tells you something about the kit. For aircraft F means fighter, B bomber, H helicopter, C is Cargo or carrier and M for miscellaneous or special purpose. One syllable means turboprop, two a jet. So a BEAR is a turboprop bomber and a FLANKER is a jet fighter. The letter suffixes give the variants.

To follow through from memory A = Air to air missile; S = Surface to surface; G = Ground to air; K = Cruise. The professionals will no doubt be long soon to expand and correct but this is the basic principle.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#7
The C in UK tanks names stood for "Cruiser" tank.
The Churchill was an Infantry tank.

Off top of my head I can only think of a couple of non C production tanks. Matilda and Valentine.

(plenty that never made it, Valient, Tortoise, Black Prince, for instance)
 
#9
The C in UK tanks names stood for "Cruiser" tank.

The NATO reporting name system for Soviet/Russian kit is a lot easier than trying to remember the Russian numbers and for NATO's many members to use. It also tells you something about the kit. For aircraft F means fighter, B bomber, H helicopter, C is Cargo or carrier and M for miscellaneous or special purpose. One syllable means turboprop, two a jet. So a BEAR is a turboprop bomber and a FLANKER is a jet fighter. The letter suffixes give the variants.

To follow through from memory A = Air to air missile; S = Surface to surface; G = Ground to air; K = Cruise. The professionals will no doubt be long soon to expand and correct but this is the basic principle.
The Fox Bat is not much of a fighter bomber though :)
 
#12
British Aircraft names after weather systems traditionally, but then we have a Hawk and Jaguar.
Back in the 30s/40s there was a 'sort of' naming convention on aircraft.
Bombers and transporters were named after cities - Stirling, Lancaster, Halifax, Wellington, York, Beverly etc
Maritime recce aircraft were named after explorers - Hudson, Shackleton, Anson
Training aircraft had education names - Oxford, Harvard, Proctor, Provost
Flying boats were named after seaside toens - Sunderland, Saro. This convention was applied to some US aircraft in UK service - Catalina, Baltimore
Aircraft for army co-operation and liaison and gliders - mythology or history - Lysander, Horsa, Hamilcar,
Navy had sea animal names - Walrus, Gannet, Roc. Torpedo craft had fishy names - Swordfish, Baracuda
 
#13
What about guns, have they ever had a naming convention anywhere, aside from the Peacemaker and was the Bazooka a name or a nickname for a number?
 
#15
What about guns, have they ever had a naming convention anywhere, aside from the Peacemaker and was the Bazooka a name or a nickname for a number?
" The universally-applied nickname arose from the M1 variant's vague resemblance to the musical instrument called a "bazooka" invented and popularized by 1930s U.S. comedian Bob Burns
"
 
#16
Don't get started on the Hun.
PzKpfw = PanzerKampfwagen. Literally Armoured War Vehicle
Stuka = Sturmkampffluzeug - Assault War Aircraft
Panzerfaust - armoured fist
Panzershreck - Tank frightener
etc etc etc
No imagination from the Krauts
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#17
Don't get started on the Hun.
PzKpfw = PanzerKampfwagen. Literally Armoured War Vehicle
Stuka = Sturmkampffluzeug - Assault War Aircraft
Panzerfaust - armoured fist
Panzershreck - Tank frightener
etc etc etc
No imagination from the Krauts
And Sonderkraftfahrzeug = SdKfz = Special Vehicle, applied to all military vehicles and equivalent to the British FV number.
 
#18
Here's a loser named after the most highly decorated US soldier of WWI.





The cure-all seemed to be the M247 Sgt. York Division Air Defense (DIVAD) gun system. A tracked vehicle on a tank chassis mounting a formidable twin Bofors 40 mm cannon armament, DIVAD would protect U.S. ground forces from any and all air threats. The system drew its name from Sgt. Alvin C. York, the sharpshooter who was one of the most decorated American soldiers of the Great War of 1914-1918.

 
#19
Here's a loser named after the most highly decorated US soldier of WWI.





The cure-all seemed to be the M247 Sgt. York Division Air Defense (DIVAD) gun system. A tracked vehicle on a tank chassis mounting a formidable twin Bofors 40 mm cannon armament, DIVAD would protect U.S. ground forces from any and all air threats. The system drew its name from Sgt. Alvin C. York, the sharpshooter who was one of the most decorated American soldiers of the Great War of 1914-1918.

Who says the Septics have no sense of humor?


M50 Ontos - Wikipedia

'Ontos' is Greek for 'the thing'.
 

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