We won the war in Afghanistan

#6
I think that it is quite despicable for The Chief of the Defence Staff, General Sir David Richards to claim any sort of victory in Afghanistan.

This is because the hundreds of British service people who have sadly been killed in Afganistan, together with the thousands who have been physically and mentally scared for life, are the equivalent of several major terrorist attacks on UK soil, so where is the victory in that :?

General Sir David Richards knows full well that this is a Unwinnable War in Afghanistan, yet he is fully prepared to lie and mislead the nation into thinking of some sort of pathetic claim of victory.

General Sir David Richards also know's full well that he Can NOT tell the nation of the true picture of the situation in his capacity of Chief of Defence ........ This is because he would be instantaneously sacked if he did!

A case of delusion and self presivation if ever i saw one :nod:
 
#7
I thought we did win the war?

It' just the peace that seems to be causing issues.
In what basis did we even win the war?

Wasn't it the Northern Alliance that ousted the Taliban from semi-national governance. Our effort was rather a minor affair chasing al-Quaida ghosts in support of the Yanks and some tanking support, wasn't it?
 
#8
Air Filter,

I am sure CDS will mention his true feeling when he retires and publishes his book; as like many senior military officers who like to criticise in retirement. The war was not won as the enermy have not been defeated, 10 years on and Kabul is still prone to attack, the Afghan government would fall pretty quickly if it was not for Western money and Soldiers.
 
#9
If we have 'won', what does that make the score in these Afghan Wars? Is it GB 3 - Afghans 2 or what?

I reckon CDS should just stick to 'fighting' and let Cameron 'do the talking'.
 
#11
Britain's streets became much safer post Oct 2001.

There has been no rise of home grown muslamic fundamentalists and there was definitely no 7/7.

These events are not linked to the invasion, sorry, liberation of GIROA
 
#12
In what basis did we even win the war?

Wasn't it the Northern Alliance that ousted the Taliban from semi-national governance. Our effort was rather a minor affair chasing al-Quaida ghosts in support of the Yanks and some tanking support, wasn't it?
I was meaning we in an allied sense... i.e. the Northern Alliance backed by the West (primarily the US) won in 2001.

Much like Iraq, the initial combat was won pretty decisively, it's just the aftermath that seems to cause problems.
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
#13
I was meaning we in an allied sense... i.e. the Northern Alliance backed by the West (primarily the US) won in 2001.

Much like Iraq, the initial combat was won pretty decisively, it's just the aftermath that seems to cause problems.
Just like WW1, great victory of military might. Then all sorts of politicians, dictators and despots rather mucked up the peace. We are very good at winning wars and losing the peace.
 
#14
Of course we won, we had an outstanding victory and defeated the Taliban decisively in the field.

And then after all that they came back and started fighting again. The dumb fcuks.
 
#18
I was meaning we in an allied sense... i.e. the Northern Alliance backed by the West (primarily the US) won in 2001.

Much like Iraq, the initial combat was won pretty decisively, it's just the aftermath that seems to cause problems.
But that, effectively, contradicts the notion that there was a war and now there's something else.

Afghanistan has been 'at war' with itself for eons. That manifestly didn't change in 2001. In 2001, 'we' chose to support one side in a vicious civil war that clearly has not ended. So, the war was not won and more than the Wehrmacht won WW2 after all it battlefield successes.

Mind you, if you follow the narrative that success in regime change equates to war victory irrespective of all other context, then I guess you may have a point. But you do seem to be setting the bar at the very lowest notch possible.
 
#19
Or

President Hamid Karzai has said his government and Nato have failed to provide Afghans with security, 10 years after the Taliban were overthrown.

After a decade of fighting in Afghanistan, retired Army General Stanley McChrystal estimated that the coalition was "a little better than" half way to achieving its military ambitions, adding that the US began the war with a "frighteningly simplistic" view.
 

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