Waterproof Jacket Recommendations

#41
The orange waterproof Salomon I was given, has been great this past few weeks. It's the best I've had quality and comfort wise. About £300 worth.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#42
If I replaced it I'd go for a Musto.
As much as I like Musto their stuff is far too flimsy for what I do.If I want to pay top £'s then I would go specialised like Nomad. I certainly wouldn't go mainstream or with a specialist thats cut corners to go mainstream!
 
#43
As much as I like Musto their stuff is far too flimsy for what I do.If I want to pay top £'s then I would go specialised like Nomad. I certainly wouldn't go mainstream or with a specialist thats cut corners to go mainstream!
I'm not wrestling wild boar like you though :)
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#44
I'm not wrestling wild boar like you though :)
I paid £150 for a Musto in a sale, I got wet walking to the station. I bought the wrong coat but its ok on the quad provided I stay away from blackthorn as it eats musto!
 
#46
Mountain Equipment, Acterix or new to market Zajo (same quality much cheper - through Sports Pursuit). Have all 3, all good for different reasons.
 
#47
I had a Keela Munro for a while, for working in the woods. Good price, durable fabric etc. But it was heavy and the fit was a bit ‘old school’ - quite boxy and therefore baggy in the wrong places and not too comfortable as a result.
r
I've got 2 Keela Munros, one red for when I want to be seen and 1 green for when i don't. Agree that they are quite heavy and especially when wet but they have kept me dry in some quite atrocious weather.
 
#48
Without wishing to be divisive, an MRT won’t hike in, snow hole, ice climb, then hike out. So your requirements are different, you will be constantly exerting.

Not disagreeing. I love my two buffaloes. When you are working, nothing beats them.
Thanks for commenting and no worries about being divisive, this is ARRSE after all.

Our typical Known Location Injury Rescue is usually around 45-60 minutes of hard effort to get to a casualty. Lower leg injury on Pen Y Fan is a 'favourite'. Hasty Party (first responders) loads up with kit then makes best speed up the hill. Then we get there and stand about a lot until the extraction kit arrives, that can often take at least another hour. Then we walk out at a much reduced intensity. Either with or without the cas depending on type of injury, weather and heli availability.

Oddly enough, your scenario was something we pretty much did earlier in the year. Remember that Red Weather Warning 2nd March? We rescued an ice climber in a remote gully that evening smack bang in the area with the highest snowfall in the UK. Couldn't get remotely close due to huge drifts with vehicles, so it was a good old fashioned tab in with lots of kit at the height of the storm - About 1.5 hours to get in, about the same at the site static trying to keep ourselves, the casualty (spinal, ribs, punctured lung, other soft tissue injuries) and his mate warm & stable, extraction kit turned up, packaged, much shorter hand carry back out as we'd managed to get a farmers Unimog type thing a bit closer - rest of us tabbed back out again. About 4.5hours.

Searches are often very slow and long so you're not moving fast enough to generate decent heat and you'll be out for hours at a time in some pretty shit conditions so you need to wrap up very warm and try and be as waterproof as possible. I might put the Keela on then, but prefer to just go for the Extreme Smock with the Skogstad shell.

Point being - We're either working balls out - I only ever see my max heart rate on call outs, never when I'm out for a run or training - or doing bugger all.

Probably why there's so many ex-mil involved - it's perfect training for MR.
 
#49
Picked up an Arcteryx Beta AR in “On sale Orange” for about half price at a REI online sale a few years. It has functioned flawlessly in torrentially rain and driving sleet. Well worth the money I paid for it. And if I do ever fall down the side of a mountain, my lifeless shattered body should be easy to spot.

If you don’t might horrible colours, the internet can turn up a bargain.
This is true:
www.sportpursuit.com was recommended to me a few years ago on this site - it is a gift that has kept on giving.

Have a scan through it and their weekly emails sometimes have good bargains, sometimes not

if you are feeling flush then it has to be the ex booty set up: Mountain Clothing & Technical Outdoor Wear | Jöttnar

the tagline is unique.... "we suffered so you don't have to"
 
#50
Thanks for commenting and no worries about being divisive, this is ARRSE after all.

Our typical Known Location Injury Rescue is usually around 45-60 minutes of hard effort to get to a casualty. Lower leg injury on Pen Y Fan is a 'favourite'. Hasty Party (first responders) loads up with kit then makes best speed up the hill. Then we get there and stand about a lot until the extraction kit arrives, that can often take at least another hour. Then we walk out at a much reduced intensity. Either with or without the cas depending on type of injury, weather and heli availability.

Oddly enough, your scenario was something we pretty much did earlier in the year. Remember that Red Weather Warning 2nd March? We rescued an ice climber in a remote gully that evening smack bang in the area with the highest snowfall in the UK. Couldn't get remotely close due to huge drifts with vehicles, so it was a good old fashioned tab in with lots of kit at the height of the storm - About 1.5 hours to get in, about the same at the site static trying to keep ourselves, the casualty (spinal, ribs, punctured lung, other soft tissue injuries) and his mate warm & stable, extraction kit turned up, packaged, much shorter hand carry back out as we'd managed to get a farmers Unimog type thing a bit closer - rest of us tabbed back out again. About 4.5hours.

Searches are often very slow and long so you're not moving fast enough to generate decent heat and you'll be out for hours at a time in some pretty shit conditions so you need to wrap up very warm and try and be as waterproof as possible. I might put the Keela on then, but prefer to just go for the Extreme Smock with the Skogstad shell.

Point being - We're either working balls out - I only ever see my max heart rate on call outs, never when I'm out for a run or training - or doing bugger all.

Probably why there's so many ex-mil involved - it's perfect training for MR.
Thanks for the summary! I had naively assumed searching would be more active than it is and hadn’t factored in the casualty stabilisation piece. I assume your casualty carries are also slower than the stretcher runs I’ve done!

I think your post proves the point i was trying to make which is your needs are very different to my plodding up a slope, digging a snow hole, sleeping then plodding down a slope where if I get too hot, I can de-layer/slow down and if I get too cold I can layer up under no time pressure.

It’s a shame I was too busy when I was at Brecon to join you lot but I would never have been able to make the training. Thanks for what you do and I hope to never have to see you in that capacity!

(Although I did routinely go up fan-y-big in shorts and a t-shirt)
 
#51
Ventile. It's the biz. I have a Sasta from Raymundo Mears website and I love it. Breathable, waterproof, quiet and very Edmund Hilary. The only drawback is it stiffens up a bit when wet.
Waterproof!!!! Really? Gortex level waterproof ?

I’ve got a genuine SASS ventile smock leaks like a ******* seive and a double layer ventile poncho and it goes like a a 20 year old tarpaulin

There is quite a comprehensive thread somewhere about jackets. I’m currently rocking a ridgeline modified by Lancashire sports repair. My almost ultimate jacket
 
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#52
Waterproof!!!! Really? Gortex level waterproof ?

I’ve got a genuine SASS ventile smock leaks like a ******* seive and a double layer ventile poncho and it goes like a a 20 year old tarpaulin
To be fair I have had no water related bother with mine. And that's my second ventile. First was a 'braemar' from hill trek which I had for ten years. Had plenty of goretex where I have ended up a sweaty mess but I'll grant you ventile can't compete with goretex water repellency. Plus gore tex doesn't go all stiff when wet. I still love my ventile though.
 
#53
At sea I don a 'Musto Snug' fleece lined bomber jkt with breathable 1000mm outer, great for exertions but if a bad storm comes I put over it a Henri Lloyd unlined 7000mm breathable thigh-length jkt with wired hood, adjustable neoprene cuffs and neck, drawstrings, stormproof pockets, etc. The unlined HL is dead light and can be neatly folded down to A4 size, pretty sure this lot would be fine in the hills but that's where I default to my 15 year-old issue Arktis smock, hard as nails for slips and stumbles and still as weatherproof as when it looked new and smart. And so many sensible pockets, you can lose stuff in it for weeks. Was thinking of treating myself to a bespoke £700 Ventile when I had the money about ten years ago, but the Arktis has just kept on going and going so I probably made the right decision.
When I need kit I haunt the ship's chandlers just as this year's must have yuppie colours come on the market, and the out-of-date fashions price plummet to 50% or less. I reckon I could probably get a new but outmoded Musto and HL combo for £200 all-in if I needed to. Specialist shops always have a price premium, e.g. hill-walking clothing, but the equivalent can often be bought from a different specialisation.
 
#54
If it is an outer layer, I can 100% recommend this...

Gust Waterproof Mens Jacket | Mountain Warehouse GB

Their ISOdry system is top notch and good value, looks and feels great.
Bone dry whilst cycling in some horrendous northern rain, mud wipes clean and the underarm vents work a treat.
Very good climate control overall, very light and comfortable.
The hood rolls up into the collar too.

A decent fleece jacket and thermal top should suffice for almost anything.

I just ordered the bottoms
 
#55
Really depends on what you are doing and in what conditions.

If you are traveling fast and light then something like Ventile is what I found to be best. Goretex and Paramo I found pretty sweaty and the latter is a bit cold. My last Ventile jacket eventually got relegated to gardening and I've now got an equivalent treated cotton jacket from Bergans. Really designed for ski touring but pretty good for most conditions.

The exception is those days of vertical continuous rain which are not unknown in Scotland. Everything eventually gives up then apart from the old Swiss army waterproof cloak; not very elegant but effective and makes a fairly good temporary shelter as a bonus.

These guys occasionally have some interesting stuff discounted.

Tamarack Outdoors | Outdoor Equipment, Clothing & Courses
 
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#56
If it is an outer layer, I can 100% recommend this...

Gust Waterproof Mens Jacket | Mountain Warehouse GB

Their ISOdry system is top notch and good value, looks and feels great.
Bone dry whilst cycling in some horrendous northern rain, mud wipes clean and the underarm vents work a treat.
Very good climate control overall, very light and comfortable.
The hood rolls up into the collar too.

A decent fleece jacket and thermal top should suffice for almost anything.

I just ordered the bottoms
I had /have a mountain warehouse waterproof isodry 10000 , it has all the properties of a teabag. Relegated to dog walking jacket
 
#57
Really depends on what you are doing and in what conditions.

If you are traveling fast and light then something like Ventile is what I found to be best. Goretex and Paramo I found pretty sweaty and the latter is a bit cold.
Can't say I've found that with Paramo, but I'm a "warm" walker. I normally only wear a base layer under a Paramo.
 
#58
I had /have a mountain warehouse waterproof isodry 10000 , it has all the properties of a teabag. Relegated to dog walking jacket

I think I may have linked the wrong jacket, the seams in mine are welded (feels like gore-tex). Umpteen hours cycling in torrential rain tonight included.
Jacket is 2 years old now and flawless.
Maybe I got lucky.

WP_20181205_20_49_46_Pro.jpg


WP_20181205_21_00_11_Pro.jpg
 
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#59
I use Paramo hiking and snow shoeing in the Alps, near where I live. Ran Fiennes recommends Paramo, as do many other big names in the exploring world. However, some people don't get on with it.
No matter how much you sweat in Paramo gear, even in cold foggy weather at altitude, the inside of the clothing remains totally dry, there is no condensation at all. That means when I stop for a break I don't start to chill from the sweat condensation I'd normally find with Goretex or other membrane jackets. Also, if you rip Paramo gear you just sew it up and it's immediately waterproof again.
One downside, if it is a downside, is that you must wear one layer less underneath because they can become very warm when you're walking hard. However, they have various venting possibilities, and body temperature can be regulated without having to remove the jacket. The other downside is that they can get a bit of static build-up so when you touch something or somebody that grounds you, you can get a shock.
I have two Paramo jackets, and I'm thinking of getting the Paramo Halcon Men's Jacket, which has even more pockets, useful for camera gear.
After using Paramo for Alpine walking I find membrane jackets inferior, most of all for the condensation build-up inside that chills you fast when you stop for a break. Paramo doesn't do that.
 

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