Waterloo

#2
Pretty impressive! Who won?
 
#4
Thanks, that is pretty impressive. 122 players and a staggering 22,435 metal figurines over 192 square metres:


Battle of Waterloo reenacted in world's biggest table top war game
The world's biggest historical table top war game using toy soldiers ever recreating the Battle of Waterloo taking place at Glasgow University. June 16, 2019. The Great Game, Waterloo Replayed includes 122 players and a staggering 22,435 metal figurines over 192 square metres. It took a total of 55,000 man hours to paint the soldiers. Glasgow University has used an independent auditor to very the number of figurines used.
 
#5
Why 28mm or is that what 25mm has become.
If so what has happened to 15mm which when I last played 30 years ago had taken over.
And yes, incredibly impressive.
 
#6
What was Airfix OO scale? 1-72, ie one inch high? It's been a very long time, but I grew up playing with those (and accidentally developing a love of history).
 
#8
They were from memory about 22 mm high.
And ditto.
I distinctly remember the ecstasy of anticipation when a new Waterloo set of soldiers was released; The news from my mate, the rush to the toy/model shop, the dreaded feeling that they might have sold out, the joy at buying a box (with the always excellent artwork), the rush home and finally the almost ritual opening of the box onto the living room floor. And then hours integrating the new, yellow, British Artillery soldiers into that day's diorama.

And don't even get me talking about how exciting it was to buy the Waterloo farmhouses and then spending hours positioning, and then re-positioning, troops upon and within its walls.....
 
#9
Why 28mm or is that what 25mm has become.
If so what has happened to 15mm which when I last played 30 years ago had taken over.
And yes, incredibly impressive.
25mm morphed into 28mm as the sculpting became ever bigger.
With the advent of GW and the like, we got 25mm 'heroic' scale, which could be up to 32mm.

15mm is still going strong, but it's mostly us old farts who use it. @Rodney2q

Most kids/students seem to be into fantasy/sci fi these days.
 
#10
25mm morphed into 28mm as the sculpting became ever bigger.
With the advent of GW and the like, we got 25mm 'heroic' scale, which could be up to 32mm.

15mm is still going strong, but it's mostly us old farts who use it. @Rodney2q

Most kids/students seem to be into fantasy/sci fi these days.
It's funny, i never enjoyed painting the non-uniformed models. It was always a challenge for example, to paint the Roman legionnaires, but dull as dish-water painting the 'Ancient Britons' (?) because there were no rules as to colour etc.

(I'm possibly a bit odd).
 
#11
I still play with my little soldier.
 
#12
It's funny, i never enjoyed painting the non-uniformed models. It was always a challenge for example, to paint the Roman legionnaires, but dull as dish-water painting the 'Ancient Britons' (?) because there were no rules as to colour etc.

(I'm possibly a bit odd).
I've always found painting non regs more fun.
Plus changing their head, arm and horses heads position to get rid of all the same position effect.
I had a mate (Radar Tech) with a young family who would sit in front of the tv with 4 figures on a stick and happily paint them up in no time to x squared the standard of mine.
 
#13
I distinctly remember the ecstasy of anticipation when a new Waterloo set of soldiers was released; The news from my mate, the rush to the toy/model shop, the dreaded feeling that they might have sold out, the joy at buying a box (with the always excellent artwork), the rush home and finally the almost ritual opening of the box onto the living room floor. And then hours integrating the new, yellow, British Artillery soldiers into that day's diorama.

And don't even get me talking about how exciting it was to buy the Waterloo farmhouses and then spending hours positioning, and then re-positioning, troops upon and within its walls.....

Same here, mid late 70's. Pocket money was always tight so we'd wait for a certain day in the week when there was a service at the left footers church a mile or two from home. The collection plate would be left in the foyer as they all left doing their hail marys. We'd be loitering outside until last of the congregation had gone, sneak in keeping low to avoid being seen from inside the church due to the glass from waist up in the foyer (modern church) & then be on our toes away on our bikes with a good handful of cash. Divvy it up & off to the local shops first thing next morning to stock up on wee blokes. Not nicking the entire plate of cash worked well as they just thought the tight gits hadn't given a lot of gelt that evening! Meant repeat visits based on Airfix releases!
 
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#14
Same here, mid late 70's. Pocket money was always tight so we'd wait for a certain day in the week when there was a service at the left footers church a mile or two from home. The collection plate would be left in the foyer as they all left doing their hail marys. We'd be loitering outside until last of the congregation had gone, sneak in keeping low to avoid being seen from inside the church due to the glass from waist up in the foyer (modern church) & then be on our toes away on our bikes with a good handful of cash. Divvy it up & off to the local shops first thing next morning to stock up on wee blokes. Not nicking the entire plate of cash worked well as they just thought the tight gits hadn't given a lot of gelt that evening! Meant repeat visits based on Airfix releases!
Stealing from the Church is like stealing from the NAAFI, you get brownie points in Paradise.
 
#15
I was one of the organisers of another Waterloo game at the National Army Museum in 2002. That was 12,000+ 15mm figures and 30+ players and that was big enough... Sky News turned up to cover it dressed in helmets and flak-jackets... :)
 
#16
25mm morphed into 28mm as the sculpting became ever bigger.
With the advent of GW and the like, we got 25mm 'heroic' scale, which could be up to 32mm.

15mm is still going strong, but it's mostly us old farts who use it. @Rodney2q

Most kids/students seem to be into fantasy/sci fi these days.
I've downsized a lot of my collection into 6mm and 10mm figures as I think it looks more in scale with the scenery and gives a more realistic scale effect, however I have too much time and effort invested in my 15mm Napoleonics, Franco-Prussian/19th Century and ancients to switch over. Frustratingly, if I sold the 15mm stuff I would have enough to buy 3 or 4 times the number of models in 10mm, but at my age I'd never get them painted before I croak... :)

My current 10mm WW1 BEF may well be one of my last projects. I just want to play with my toys rather than keep painting new ones.

Edited for crap spelling...
 
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#17
25mm morphed into 28mm as the sculpting became ever bigger.
With the advent of GW and the like, we got 25mm 'heroic' scale, which could be up to 32mm.

15mm is still going strong, but it's mostly us old farts who use it. @Rodney2q

Most kids/students seem to be into fantasy/sci fi these days.
I'm just confused, as the kewl kidz insist on referring to my 15mm toys as '18mm'... Bah!

 
#18
It's funny, i never enjoyed painting the non-uniformed models. It was always a challenge for example, to paint the Roman legionnaires, but dull as dish-water painting the 'Ancient Britons' (?) because there were no rules as to colour etc.

(I'm possibly a bit odd).
Same here. I'm presently at an impasse with my Mamelukes of the Guard because they have random shirt, waistcoat and sash colours and I'm wracked with indecision...
 
#19
I'm just confused, as the kewl kidz insist on referring to my 15mm toys as '18mm'... Bah!

18mm is the new 15mm in the same way that 28mm has become the new 25mm, largely due to the influence of the excellent AB Napoleonic range.
 
#20
18mm is the new 15mm in the same way that 28mm has become the new 25mm, largely due to the influence of the excellent AB Napoleonic range.
Bah! They were just big 15mm when I sold 'em… ;) Tony B just made them big because his eyesight was suffering... The kewl kidz in Oz now call them 18mm, but they're still the same 15mm figures... ;)
 
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