Water Wars

Water scarce, Aurangabad villagers guard tank 24X7 - Times of India

Interesting article but I'm blowed if I can see tank in the pics. Are they actually referring to the lake?
In India and Sri Lanka the word "tank" can also refer to an artificial reservoir in the ground. There is probably some size above which it wouldn't be a "tank" anymore, but I have no idea what that would be. Most of the "tanks" that I have seen pictures of are smaller than the one in that story and usually seem to be rectangular in shape.
 
Central Asian problems in the 'Stans

In Kyrgyzstan, warming brings less water - and more conflict | Reuters

Musabaev, of the Central Asian Alliance for Water, says that lack of cooperation could mean more conflict ahead as climate change brings more competition for water.

“Unless there is greater regional cooperation over water then these issues might create the next big war,” said Musabaev. “The war of the 22nd Century - a war over water.”
 
Central Asian problems in the 'Stans

In Kyrgyzstan, warming brings less water - and more conflict | Reuters

Musabaev, of the Central Asian Alliance for Water, says that lack of cooperation could mean more conflict ahead as climate change brings more competition for water.

“Unless there is greater regional cooperation over water then these issues might create the next big war,” said Musabaev. “The war of the 22nd Century - a war over water.”
As the story notes, things will get much worse as the glaciers shrink. Much of their water for the summer months comes from glacial melt. Once the glaciers become too small to matter, what water they do get will come as melting snow all at once in the spring and then little to nothing over the summer. The same is true in quite a few other places.
 
As the story notes, things will get much worse as the glaciers shrink. Much of their water for the summer months comes from glacial melt. Once the glaciers become too small to matter, what water they do get will come as melting snow all at once in the spring and then little to nothing over the summer. The same is true in quite a few other places.
The glacial headwaters are a problem, so is the dodgy post Soviet infrastructure, but the key problem is that 25 percent of the population live in the same valley, all compete for the same resource, u Der three nations ...
 
The glacial headwaters are a problem, so is the dodgy post Soviet infrastructure, but the key problem is that 25 percent of the population live in the same valley, all compete for the same resource, u Der three nations ...
There is also a special problem in this particular case which the news story only alludes to. The Fergana Valley is a large, fertile, densely populated valley where most of the valley floor (where the farms are) belongs to Uzbekistan, while the surrounding mountains (where the water comes from) belong to Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. In fact Uzbekistan is almost entirely dependent upon water which originates in other countries. Since they have the largest population in Central Asia and an economy that is heavily dependent upon agriculture, that is a big problem.

When Central Asia was controlled by first the Russian Empire and later the Soviet Union, the borders didn't matter so much. Now however that each is an independent country, there is much less incentive to cooperate in terms of water resources.

Add in the fact that population growth is very rapid, and the situation there has a lot of potential for conflict.
 
In Finland very pure water is retrieved from a bore hole. However, farmers are concerned that this could adversley affect the water table and their livelihood. This article shows how the British Geological Survey has been able to provide a monitoring solution.


There are some interesting BBC "pop up" articles / videos relating to water shortages in India. Many of these are a couple of years old but are still relevant.

When a well dried up, a farmer's found a sewage pipe with some water in it. Using raw sewage to irrigate and feed crops is very risky. Fortunately the farmer realised that he could turn his land over to producing non-food plants which silk worms feed on. This has been successful and has improved his income.



Bangalore has physically run out of water - it has to be transported in by tankers. There are issues with corruption and concerns about the water quality. It is ironic that Bangalore was once a water management pioneer.

ARRSE parses the hyperlink as a blank media object o_O
Try copying and pasting the link below but remove the two "%" symbols:
https://%www.%bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-43252435

Communities are gradually dying out as women will not move there when they know that there is a shortage of water. Those who are there have a very hard life physically carrying water to the villages.
 
Last edited:
This is very interesting. A French inventor has developed highly absobent granules which retain over 90% of the water they encounter. Plants grown with the granules adopt them as a life support package of water and nutrients which tides them over periods of drought. He has exported a lot of it to Africa. In France they have been used to grow flowers for the past seven years but have not yet been approved for growing food with. Some biodegradable plastic is used so further studies are required. Two plants are shown by a farmer. One grown normally and the other with the granules. The former has the usual packed out roots and the latter a lot less roots. This aspect seemed obvious but was not mentioned. It may make harvesting easier but I wonder about helping to prevent desertification in terms of soil binding given fewer roots. It is clearly better than nothing and looks like it has a lot of potential. Link to video at bottom of post.
1544289942883.png

1544289973892.png

French inventor touts new tech to battle drought
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top