Water shortage, why?

Finally someone has found a use for Wales.
Anywhere high up with lots of water is good. Wales, Peak District,Pennines etc.

You sadly now get retards in those areas demanding pavement for that area fir capturing and storing water.

As I say, we have plenty of water but don’t effectivly capture it. Talk of desalination plants is false economy.
 
Privatisation has by and large screwed all long term planning for all utilities.

Like all companies, utilities are share price and dividend driven. Thus they are doing the minimum possible to comply with their legal obligations whilst channeling funds to shareholders.

Thames water have been fined on multiple occasions for excessive leakage and pollution.

E.g. In March 2017 a judge imposed a record fine of £20.3m on Thames Water after large leaks of untreated sewage, totalling 1.4bn litres, occurred over a number of years.

Ownership:
Thames Water plc was acquired by the German utility company RWE in 2001. As well as its British operations, it continued as an international water treatment consultancy and acquired further overseas operations.

On 17 October 2006, following several years of criticism about failed leakage targets in the UK, RWE announced it would sell Thames Water for £8 billion to Kemble Water Holdings Ltd, a consortium led by the Australian Macquarie Group. In December 2006, the sale of Thames Water's British operation went ahead, with RWE keeping the overseas operations.

On 14 March 2017, Macquarie Group sold its remaining stake in Thames Water's holding company to OMERS and the Kuwait Investment Authority.

Currently the largest shareholders are Canadian pensions group OMERS (23%), BT Pension Scheme (13%), the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (9.9%), the China Investment Corporation (8.7%) and the Kuwait Investment Authority (8.5%)

Since 2007, it has made capital investments at least £1 billion a year in its infrastructure – the largest such annual investment within the UK water industry. In 2015–2016, this figure was £1.2 billion.[2] This level of investment has allowed the company to defer, but not avoid, substantial portions of its corporation tax liability in line with UK tax law.


The other water companies are not much better. BTW, Thames Water loses 25% of treated water through leaks, and Severn Trent 27%. These are typical of the privatised companies.
Interesting programme last light on BBC2 about Thames Water. Spending a lot of money it is.
 
The air that we breathe?[/QUOTE]


They already do, car road tax. My old motor, which on scrapping was 14 years old, the last road tax was £235 , my new car, 3 years old, slightly smaller engine, catalytic converter, and all the modern fitted clean engine bells and whistles,.... road tax £30. MOT gas emissions.........
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
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There are quite a few wrong assumptions going on here.

1. The UK has lots of rain. Actually it has a fairly average amount (~800mm per year) and it is very concentrated to the west - the south and east get a lot less. By comparison, New York gets something like 1,300mm, Milan around 1,100, Paris 650, Bordeaux 950. Britain is cloudy a lot. It is not as rainy as we think - partly because high rainfall places tend to get regular but passing storm or monsoon type conditions where huge amounts of water fall rapidly. The UK gets a lot of permacloud but low rainfall conditions. We equate lack of sun with presence of rain, and it's not the same.

2. UK water leakage is bad or extreme. Not so. We are somewhere in the middle of the pack again. The easiest source I can find is from 2000 (https://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/figures/losses-from-urban-water-networks) which has the UK at 22% loss, and about 8 years ago some areas (Thames) topped out at 29%, before improving again. It's fair to say that privatised water management has not been efficient: it's not true to say it is demonstrably worse than non-privatised management. That list includes both efficient and inefficient private and public water agencies. Also note that it's standard for a quarter to a third of "network leakage" to actually mean individual household leakage, i.e. you, not the agency running the network.

3. UK immigration is extreme. Again, not so: up to 2012 stats are here - List of countries by net migration rate - Wikipedia - sort the columns by net migration rate. UK is in the top third (36th / 37th) but our actual net inflow (+2.5 per 1000) is unremarkable. One third of Spain, half that of Australia, Belgium, Sweden, Switzerland, two thirds of the US, Italy, Ireland (yes, the UK main has a lower immigration rate than Ireland, who don't spaz out about it). Bear in mind these are also 2012 figures...since then many mainland EU countries have seen a large immigration uptick, so comparatively our net migration rate will be even less. This will clearly trigger some immigration crazies - the point is that other countries deal with the same or worse levels of migration without droughts. What we do have is a problematic population density, which is higher in the south-east of England than most comparable countries. There are too many people per square meter, effectively.

There is also a point that can be made about natural aquifers, but actually if you look at a geological map, the main UK aquifers (Groundwater | Climate change | Discovering Geology | British Geological Survey (BGS)) are pretty much bang on the main UK population centres (Demography of the United Kingdom - Wikipedia meaning that there isn't any particular improvement that can be gained from building elsewhere.

If you map those three things on top of each other, you get a concentration of problems around the south-east of England: most people per square meter; least annual mm of rain; least efficient water companies. Add to that, as someone pointed out earlier, in a year like this, freezing conditions (such as we had earlier in the year) actually cause more water problems than they solve, because the infrastructure often springs more leaks than the rainfall makes up.

This doesn't mean that the water companies like Thames are particularly good (Thames are clearly being run for a profit motive alone, and have been for nearly two decades); it doesn't mean that politicians are particularly competent in this area (broadly they can't even plan beyond 9 months at the moment, usually they have difficulty looking past 5 years, 10-20 year timescales are definitely beyond them); it doesn't mean migration doesn't create more problems (it clearly adds more pressure). It does mean that blaming or fixing any one of those things alone isn't going to solve the problem.

The UK clearly has a general problem of inadequate and ailing infrastructure in all sorts of areas. Anyone who has lived in plenty of other countries in Europe, Middle East, Americas - with some exceptions like California - can probably relate that UK infrastructure is often second-world, from trains to roads to internet to water. But taking general lines of thought like "it seems to be raining a lot, why do we have water shortages?" or "must be too many immigrants" aren't a great way to understand the problem.
 
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As I say, we have plenty of water but don’t effectively capture it. Talk of desalination plants is false economy.
Not down here it isn't. Algarve is famous for three hundred days of sunshine per year and it rarely rains at all between the end of May and October, the holiday period when all the summer complaints are filling the hotels, restaurants and beaches, clogging the roads with their mong driving and stomping all over the lawns.

Let us be realistic. Either each and every summer complaint gets three showers a day, at least two dumps, innumerable chi-chis and fresh sheets and towels every morning, or else the golfiistas have to pay a little extra for a desalination plant. As a permanent resident I hate them all equally, but the water table cannot accommodate both.

OZ
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
Some states in the USA either ban entirely or restrict the amount of rainwater you can collect. Admittedly they are in the hotter, more arid areas: Arizona, Colorado (here, I believe, you can collect upto 110 liters in no more than 2 water butts.), Oklahoma and Utah.
 
The air that we breathe?

A signaller wrote at 10.18 this morning, "They already do, car road tax. My old motor, which on scrapping was 14 years old, the last road tax was £235 , my new car, 3 years old, slightly smaller engine, catalytic converter, and all the modern fitted clean engine bells and whistles,.... road tax £30. MOT gas emissions........".

Don't even get me started on this one. I brought my 3.9 petrol V8 Range Rover Classic with me when I emigrated to Portugal from the UK. Free movement of goods and services within the EU, my Arrse! Ten grand 'import duty', which is illegal under EU law, with an extra grand on top for 'emissions' despite it having two brand new cats when I arrived and then the fekkers still demand eight hundred and something Euros every year for the privilege of taking it on the road. Meanwhile at Faro airport, there are reserved parking spaces nearest the terminal for hybrids and other electric nonsense each with a carbon footprint that would make Bigfoot blush, yet when I park the RR next to them the emissions are identical at zero. The virtue signalling, disfunctional, thieving fekkers!

And relax.

OZ

Edited for mong code.
 
Not down here it isn't. Algarve is famous for three hundred days of sunshine per year and it rarely rains at all between the end of May and October, the holiday period when all the summer complaints are filling the hotels, restaurants and beaches, clogging the roads with their mong driving and stomping all over the lawns.

Let us be realistic. Either each and every summer complaint gets three showers a day, at least two dumps, innumerable chi-chis and fresh sheets and towels every morning, or else the golfiistas have to pay a little extra for a desalination plant. As a permanent resident I hate them all equally, but the water table cannot accommodate both.

OZ
As somebody else posted. Franco made sure that he captured the not insignificant amount of water from the mountains.

Amy problems now are similar to the U.K. extra capacity built in has been eaten away by unexpected population growths. Unless of course Franco planned for Spain to become a tourist Mecca
 
You think your bad

Irish Government set up a new independent privatised water utility a few years ago. They then set about the task of installing water meters (which had been previously removed). Huge protests.

Then they gave a “water conservation grant” (basically money off).

I think the 1st (possibly the 2nd) bills were issued. Then roll back no more charging for water. Then the money off and paid bills were refunded.
As you mentioned water meters: We have just moved out of a house into another and are still responsible for the old house for a couple of weeks. Couple of days ago the Mrs rolls up to the old place to make sure it has not been stolen or burnt down and there is a City Utilities pick-up truck parked across the driveway.

The house has a smart meter fitted to measure water consumption and as it had returned zero usage for a week they sent someone out to check why. Nosey, big brother, fcekers. Allegedly to see if there were any problems but, my spidey sense's tell me it was to check we had not managed to bypass the meter during the annual high water usage period.
 
Some states in the USA either ban entirely or restrict the amount of rainwater you can collect. Admittedly they are in the hotter, more arid areas: Arizona, Colorado (here, I believe, you can collect upto 110 liters in no more than 2 water butts.), Oklahoma and Utah.
Why so?
 
I would comment in terms of population that we have a nominal 65 million recorded people within the UK but a lot more unrecorded living illegally off grid.
  • The ONS reported thair estimate of ~650,000 in 2016,
  • LSE estimated ~670,000 in 2007 (a left-leaning organisation)
  • Migration Watch estimated 1,100,000 in 2010
  • Alisdair Palmer[Home Office] claimed that the Home Office were of the opinion that each year as many as 150,000-250,000 foreign nationals fail to return home when they should or enter illegally [per year]
  • The Times [June 2017] claimed "Secret Home Office estimates put the level of illegal immigration at up to 250,000 people a year and ministers are suppressing the true scale of the issue, a report by two former officials published today has claimed."
Potentially, I suspect that we have something around 1.5 - 1.75M people illegally in the UK putting additional strain on resources. Many will be in London & the South East. [The rest are probably in Accrington.]

Once the additional numbers are factored in, it illustrates that the whole system is under strain.

My friend who works in Slough reckons that they have 5,000+ illegals living in garages and garden sheds, just from the number they are clearing out every week.
 

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