Water shortage, why?

We also have the issue that we are trying to supply an increased population
That, to me, is the problem in a nutshell. It works out at about one new, thirsty mouth a minute for the thirteen years Labour held the door open. In that time how much infrastructure did they invest in - reservoirs, treatment plants, treated water storage, sewage plants, delivery network to get water from where it is plentiful to where it is not, etc?

Precisely.
 
That, to me, is the problem in a nutshell. It works out at about one new, thirsty mouth a minute for the thirteen years Labour held the door open. In that time how much infrastructure did they invest in - reservoirs, treatment plants, treated water storage, sewage plants, delivery network to get water from where it is plentiful to where it is not, etc?

Precisely.
As explained in...

https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/day-zero-in-cape-town-the-big-thirst.272050/

When you increase the population by 25% because of 'economic migration', the infrastructure will be fucked.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
That, to me, is the problem in a nutshell. It works out at about one new, thirsty mouth a minute for the thirteen years Labour held the door open. In that time how much infrastructure did they invest in - reservoirs, treatment plants, treated water storage, sewage plants, delivery network to get water from where it is plentiful to where it is not, etc?

Precisely.
Shouldn't all that be, in principle, the responsibility of the (privatised) water companies?

MsG
 
My old man lives on an estate of bungalows built before WWII. About 10 years ago he got a new neighbour whom he saw measuring his garden. When asked what he was doing he replied that every bungalow had a soakaway in the garden and he was claiming money back from his waste water bill. My old man contacted Southern Water and got 20 quid knocked off his annual bill.
Pretty soon by word of mouth every owner on the estate had done the same thing. Southern Water knew about these soakaways but neglected to tell anyone they existed, on a 100 home estate thats a lot of income for them.
 
Shouldn't all that be, in principle, the responsibility of the (privatised) water companies?

MsG
In theory electricity generation is in private hands but benefits from government investment.

It was another of Brown's massive blunders, selling off the "golden share" that ensured that privatised utilities of strategic importance remained under government control. The one-eyed Scottish idiot.
 
My old man lives on an estate of bungalows built before WWII. About 10 years ago he got a new neighbour whom he saw measuring his garden. When asked what he was doing he replied that every bungalow had a soakaway in the garden and he was claiming money back from his waste water bill. My old man contacted Southern Water and got 20 quid knocked off his annual bill.
Pretty soon by word of mouth every owner on the estate had done the same thing. Southern Water knew about these soakaways but neglected to tell anyone they existed, on a 100 home estate thats a lot of income for them.
Having acquired a copy of the construction layout for my village I'm in the middle of demonstrating to Wessex Water that my buildings surface water run-off does not enter the public sewage system and so, according to the notes they send with their bills, we're entitled to a discount not currently applied. As this has been the case since the place was built in 2000 there should be grounds to claim for the discount to be retrospectively applied, too, as it was policy since before then.

Then I'm telling the rest of the street. In fact, as the plans show the entire storm water system into which building rainwater run-off for the whole village runs is entirely separate from the sewers and outflows into the jurisdiction of the EA I'll be telling the whole village. Hopefully every household will claim - all 3000 of them, all the way back to 2000...

Not that I think WW take the piss or anything, and need rabbit-punching firmly in their corporate gonads.
 
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Didn’t see it but suspected the poster was tongue in cheek, didn’t really think we are going to lay grey water pipes and sell it did he?
I was at a school in liverpool, the caretaker asked to borrow a drill,

He was wantingto make a hole in the wall to connect to water to a vending machine,

err... you do know thats a central heating pipe going to that radiator..

anyone fancy a ferrox favoured cadbury hot chocolate ?
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
In theory electricity generation is in private hands but benefits from government investment.

It was another of Brown's massive blunders, selling off the "golden share" that ensured that privatised utilities of strategic importance remained under government control. The one-eyed Scottish idiot.
I wasn't aware of that. Thanks a bunch for the information. Would you happen to know when Cyclops Broon implemented the selloff? We didn't actually arrive in the UK until summer 2004, and I worked for Severn Trent for a three-month until we got on our feet. Which is why I've no time at all for the greedy bästards. Was the selloff before that?

MsG
 
there has been a hosepipe ban here in NI for a week or two, but why does it not apply to the three big romanian carwashers here in lisburn,power washers on full blast all day, but if I put a cupful of water on my marigolds it's off to jail for you sunny jim.
 
Interesting reading. Run and controlled by the Scots, In a word, nationalised, within the framework of the Scottish parliament. In England and Wales, not so, run by private firms, some foriegn, for profit.
Also supplying a population that hasn’t grown and may also be introducing a hosepipe ban in the not so distant future.

Explain to me again why as a tax payer I should be funding infrastructure projects that don’t benefit me?
 
Seen a few hippy, new age, enviro-community projects where they turn grey water into perfectly clear, pure, drinkable water with multi stage filtration which includes allowing the pre-purified water to run through hydroponic plant beds as a stage of the process.

I saw a project in Oxfordshire that had a rainwater collection cistern built under the drive of the house. The cistern was made of concrete, I can't remember the capacity of the cistern but, the number 12,000 [litres] pops into my head - I know it wasn't small.

I considered putting a couple of water friendly versions of these under the back garden to harvest rainwater. Not difficult, dig some holes and trenches, pipe, pump, bury everything.

Heating Oil Tanks & Kerosene Tanks | Fuel Tank Shop

And, if you think it is bad now, imagine what it will be like when the population of Nigeria reaches 500 million in the not too distant future and they all want to come to europe for a drink.
Imagine the amount of water saved every year (and costs in making water potable) if all new toilets only used rain water.... for example.
 
From 2010:

Water torture: 3,300,000,000 litres are lost every single day through

Add another 8 million people or so (that are accounted for), most of the country not on meters and it all looks very British ie Don't plan for the future and play down the current trend, charge the customer for the difference in losses.

I say make metering the law and have a high tariff for extreme users and a nice cheap tariff for responsible users.
For water companies, have caps on ludicrous profits, if they lose water due to bad infrastructure, they lose profits until they fix the problem, No passing the buck to the end user.

End users......No meter, no water, fvck off.

Get it all into law, no fvcking about. Green grass all round.
 
We need to flood a couple more welsh villages to prevent this happening in future, my Garden roses are looking sadder than a dying Rhino.
 
Also supplying a population that hasn’t grown and may also be introducing a hosepipe ban in the not so distant future.

Explain to me again why as a tax payer I should be funding infrastructure projects that don’t benefit me?

I assume you are north of the border, by your avatar, so your water charges are paying for the routine maintenance and infrastructure up-grades of Scottish water. If not, your water charges are paid into one of the many different regional private owned supply company's. Which ever way you cut it, somewhere along the line, you pay. If as you say it does not benefit you, I can only conclude that your supply comes from a well or stream on your own property, and you treat your sewage yourself.

I like all people pay tax, even thought I earn nothing, and am retired, they tax my pensions, I do not have any control over that. I resent it greatly, however, I realise that the world and its public facilities have to be funded, one way or another. You can moan all you like, but the only two constants in life are,......... death and taxes.
 

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