Water shortage, why?

#82
Because if we had drinking water and " grey " water supplies to homes at differing prices a lot of morons will be trying to sue because they've got ill from drinking the less treated water.

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They grey water is only plumbed to your toilet, if you are drinking from that there is a fair chance your illness is from your own fecal matter!
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#84
They grey water is only plumbed to your toilet, if you are drinking from that there is a fair chance your illness is from your own fecal matter!
Hence the previous poster's use of the word "moron".
 
#85
What a bunch of snowflakes you all are, one water authority has, after at least 6 weeks with effectively no rain, imposed a ban on wasting water on your garden, which you shouldn't need to do anyway if you planted sensibly. Your grandad made do with 2 pints per day in North Africa, what would he say. [Yes, I know "During the War....."]
 
#88
Your grandad made do with 2 pints per day in North Africa, what would he say. [Yes, I know "During the War....."]
My brother and SiL, having been here and suffered it, adopted Cape Town water saving drills in theit South of England home.
The council came round to check why they were using so little water, assuming the meter was faulty!
 
#89
Do office buildings (where a great load of shit is generated) have water tanks and grey water recycling? Look at the shard and gherkin, fugly but they should be able to recycle grey water I assume?

What if housing towers had a grey water facility to recycle sink and shower runoff to toilets.

Yes I am sure as mentioned before some people (morons) will tap it for free water, but they probably drank worse than that in whatever African sh..hole they came from.
 
#90
My brother and SiL, having been here and suffered it, adopted Cape Town water saving drills in theit South of England home.
The council came round to check why they were using so little water, assuming the meter was faulty!
I bet they conceded that your brother was cheating the council rather than saving them from drought and how can we monetize this.

It would therefore be easier to tax these innovative folks for their low cost water rather than encouraging it through grants for the better of the future....4 year term government mentality.
 
#91
I bet they conceded that your brother was cheating the council rather than saving them from drought and how can we monetize this.

It would therefore be easier to tax these innovative folks for their low cost water rather than encouraging it through grants for the better of the future....4 year term government mentality.
Just goes to show how much wastage there is.
There's stories of stand-up fistfights in certain local sports club, where some members who are 'aware' called some 10 minute shower asshat an asshat.
 
#93
I think the main problem is about 70 years of government without any strategic infrastructure plan for the country (thank fnuck for the Victorians and Edwardians; where would we be without their vision and effort?!).


According to latest figures, we imported around 280,000 people last year alone (possibly thats 350k in realistic figures). Thats enough people to fill a major city. I imagine that 280-350k people require a lot of water, even if some of them are averse to washing.

Question is, how did the government intend to supply that "instant major city" with water (or power, or road capacity, or public transport capacity, etc and so on)? Where is the infrastructure White Paper that describes the build targets that have to be met - from private industry, the State, or some PFI mess?
To be fair. It does get addressed when it needs addressing.

Thames Tideway Scheme - Wikipedia

There’s akso HS2. Aneccessary requitement because areas of the British rail infrastructure need increased capacity.

Dealing with hosepipe bans isn’t really a major problem. It’s a first world problem and we’re no where near the level off water rationing.

Give it 6 months and we’ll be complaining about flooding because we decided to build on flood planes
 
#95
Yep.
And when they 'brown envelope' it so that homes can be built on flood plains...
Happens a lot in Safferland.
Unfortunately, those 20-30 year occurrences when the rivers go batshit, and your house is now 6" under water...
I remember seeing a sign stating land for future development sticking out of about six feet of water formed by a temporary lake during one of the winter floods of the last few years. Where it was is now a new estate.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
#96
In my view, it's the private water companies that are to blame. They constantly put off any improvements/repairs until they can't get around them anymore. And all because they're intent on making maximum profits.

There are three types of sewerage: surface water sewerage (SWS), taking water from runoff and normally piping it to the nearest stream, river or lake: foul water sewerage (FWS), getting rid of what goes into bogs and being piped to the local water-treatment facility; and mixed water sewerage (MWS), which is found in practically all old town-centres and goes in with the FWS contents.

Where the water companies have found the goose that lays the golden egg is the way in which they charge for water. There are quite a few folks in the UK who have water meters and they're charged accordingly, because they can "prove" how much they've used. The important, and lucrative, point here is that the water companies can only monitor how much fresh (drinking) water they produce, but not where it goes to. So what they do is to divide up the rest among the vast majority of UK water users who have no water meters. What they don't mention is that they also include the wastage in that amount (Severn Trent water has a wastage figure of about 30 percent of the fresh water they produce). That means that they're getting paid for it regardless, but no-one gets to use it. It's the reason why they've no real interest in actually repairing the faulty lines.

Another scam they're all party to is with "run-off". That's supposed to be the rainwater that falls on your property and finds its way into the SWS pipes. However, a terraced house occupied by one family will pay the standard rate, while the terraced house next door, that's been divided up into, say, three separate flats will pay three times that amount because each flat is charged at the same rate as the exact same-sized house occupied by the single family. The formula used for calculating runoff is also a complete load of bollocks. I've called and e-mailed Severn Trent a total of 12 times, asking for a comprehensive breakdown of their figures, but to date I've received no response.

It really is time that water (as something essential to life) is nationalised, before purely profit-orientated, shite water companies like Severn Trent actually get what they've been pushing for for years: which is the right to cut off someone's water supply if they fail to pay the bill (which is at present prohibited by law), if the consumer has literally been priced out of the market.

MsG
 
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#97
They're still building on the Somerset Levels.
They'll be sorry!
 
#98
Ireland is also suffering similar problems but we have huge issues with Victorian era pipework that leaks.

Bigger reservoirs?

Complusory rain & grey water collection for new builds?
Seen a few hippy, new age, enviro-community projects where they turn grey water into perfectly clear, pure, drinkable water with multi stage filtration which includes allowing the pre-purified water to run through hydroponic plant beds as a stage of the process.

I saw a project in Oxfordshire that had a rainwater collection cistern built under the drive of the house. The cistern was made of concrete, I can't remember the capacity of the cistern but, the number 12,000 [litres] pops into my head - I know it wasn't small.

I considered putting a couple of water friendly versions of these under the back garden to harvest rainwater. Not difficult, dig some holes and trenches, pipe, pump, bury everything.

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And, if you think it is bad now, imagine what it will be like when the population of Nigeria reaches 500 million in the not too distant future and they all want to come to europe for a drink.
 
Seen a few hippy, new age, enviro-community projects where they turn grey water into perfectly clear, pure, drinkable water with multi stage filtration which includes allowing the pre-purified water to run through hydroponic plant beds as a stage of the process.
Yes.
There's a system available for swimming pools, with a mahoosive filtration tank, pushes it though a system of filters and returns it to the pool without all the nonsense of chemicals.
Other versions involve a 'bio weir', where a huge water feature has lots of plants in it, as well as various outlets, back into the pool.
Unfortunately the fact for both you have to have a GBFO pump running 24/24, and the filters have to be taken out, scrubbed (using clean water, and all the crud gets flushed down the drain) every 3 days, tends to negate the 'green' aspect.
Spending hundreds to save pennies.
 

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