Water shortage, why?

#61
Why aren’t farmers encouraged to dig a few ponds for watering their crops.
There are many and farmers make money by renting them out to Angling clubs, Berners Hall, Little Henham plus loads of others around my way are used for crop and animal drinking.
 
#62


Rainwater collection tank, in SA.
My dad (not him in the pic) has one this large, and uses it to fill 2l plastic bottles, which are then used to flush the loo.
Again, being restricted to 50l a day, on pain of incredibly punitive tariffs, does tend to concentrate the mind a bit.
And yes, we were worried that the city would run out.
I have 3 rainwater butts, for garden use only. Now all empty, so I decided to clean them all out, they are all about 5 years old. The stench and black sludge at the bottom was horrific, years of pollution in the air, trapped in rain droplets and slowly built up into a thick sludge. Looking at the picture of the jumbo tank in SA, how do you clean out the stinking muck that will inevitably build up over time?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#63
South Africa is close to how life was in Puerto Rico although in PR here was less crime but the water to a whole town would go off with no notice, not even in Spanish whilst some one dug up a road. Not enough rain in winter for water butts and to add insult to injury power cuts were commonplace. No ice to chill the cola. We used to buy frozen OJ and mix it with bottled water. The 5 litre jugs were refilled with tap water and stored in the bathroom so we could flush the loo it was that commonplace.
A mate of mine in Sussex lives partly off the grid, he did connect to the sewers so his septic could be used to catch rainwater and as he pumps it back I for domestic use he gets a big rebate, they wont do a rebate for tanked catchwater even if like me you have 1500l of drums permanently attached to your downpipes the tossers.
 
#64
I have 3 rainwater butts, for garden use only. Now all empty, so I decided to clean them all out, they are all about 5 years old. The stench and black sludge at the bottom was horrific, years of pollution in the air, trapped in rain droplets and slowly built up into a thick sludge. Looking at the picture of the jumbo tank in SA, how do you clean out the stinking muck that will inevitably build up over time?
The plastic inner bladder is treated, so it discourages the growth of algae.
There's also a very clever sump underneath, 10" or so below the normal tap, so all the sediment can be drained off occasionally - IIRC a 'service' is recommended every 24 months.
As the water is static most of the time, unlike in a swimming pool, the nasty stuff sinks to the bottom, and doesn't stay in solution.
 
#65
It isn't necessarily more water efficient to wash by hand. Our normal sized dishwasher goes on every other day typically (4 of us in the house) and uses approx 12 litres per wash cycle, or about one third of doing it by hand.

We keep a couple of steel litre jugs by the sink which any clean water goes into e.g. part glasses of water, the cold water before the hot arrives etc -- this gets used to water the plants and for rinsing things. We also have 1200 litres of rainwater capacity.

I'm currently looking at installing a DIY rainwater collection system for the toilet in the garage outbuilding.

However, the payback time in terms of water saving is ridiculous (about 20 years for a 200 litre rainwater butt) so you're just saving money for the utilities companies.
And that’s why the utility company’s have been very clever at getting people to find that themselves to make themselves feel good.

Worried about the environment? Buy a Prius and do you’re bit.....please do ignore the fact that a Prius is more damaging to the environment than a Hummer. Just sit back and feel smug amongst your friends.

Changes like rain water harvesting and reusing water can easily be rectified over time, but we always seem to think short term. Pass legislation to ensure that new builds can recycle bath water for the toilet . Do it slowly and methodically. Not knee jerked and uncoordinated.
 
#66
Oh well, I guess that I will have to fill my daughters paddling pool up at night then, only takes about 3-4 hours so I’ll take a few ciders out to the garden to while away the time. :)
 
#67
You know something's not right when the words desalination and the UK are mentioned in the same sentence. It's not Saudi Arabia FFS!! It's pouring/ drizzling/ raining/ whatever here a lot of the time! Yes, the summer this year has been uncharacteristically warm/long/ good (at least in/ around London) but even then. The water companies really must be taking the piss.
Agree, that was my point, Adelaide was in almost 5 years of drought, every new house has to have water tanks which feed one toilet as standard and you can obviously use it for the garden.

That must have been so successful that after all this time I have never had a water ban (they do restrict garden watering to one day a week in summer but it’s a bit opulent to expect a green lawn in a desert)! Plus plastic lawns are OK if you don’t own an acre!

There are large pipelines across the state of South Aus to move the water but they still manage farming and no stand pipes!

Suppose it’s just one of the things the government let slip when they prioritize foreign aid over infrastructure!
 
#68
Worried about the environment? Buy a Prius and do you’re bit.....please do ignore the fact that a Prius is more damaging to the environment than a Hummer. Just sit back and feel smug amongst your friends.
.
And have 4 kids.
And a Harley for weekends.

Notice how many hybrids actually advertise the fact that they are hybrids - by being ******* ugly?
"Oh everyone look because not only am I doing my bit for planet-saving, but also have this fugly POS car to prove it!"
 
#69
I think the main problem is about 70 years of government without any strategic infrastructure plan for the country (thank fnuck for the Victorians and Edwardians; where would we be without their vision and effort?!).


According to latest figures, we imported around 280,000 people last year alone (possibly thats 350k in realistic figures). Thats enough people to fill a major city. I imagine that 280-350k people require a lot of water, even if some of them are averse to washing.

Question is, how did the government intend to supply that "instant major city" with water (or power, or road capacity, or public transport capacity, etc and so on)? Where is the infrastructure White Paper that describes the build targets that have to be met - from private industry, the State, or some PFI mess?
 
#70
Isn’t the byproduct of fuel cells water? Collect the water from your fuel cell to use in your shower, just like perpetual motion you could use the power cell to create and heat the water.
 
#71
I think the main problem is about 70 years of government without any strategic infrastructure plan for the country (thank fnuck for the Victorians and Edwardians; where would we be without their vision and effort?!).


According to latest figures, we imported around 280,000 people last year alone (possibly thats 350k in realistic figures). Thats enough people to fill a major city. I imagine that 280-350k people require a lot of water, even if some of them are averse to washing.

Question is, how did the government intend to supply that "instant major city" with water (or power, or road capacity, or public transport capacity, etc and so on)? Where is the infrastructure White Paper that describes the build targets that have to be met - from private industry, the State, or some PFI mess?
Is the problem that the majority of these 300k will never have a job to pay for the water.

Merkel can allow it but imagine the strain on Greece!

Bloody EU’s fault!
 
#72
I do find it weird that it is us in the NW (with a HUGE amount of reservoirs) being hit with this first, and apart from the supply issue caused by the UV filters I mentioned earlier, there is a fair chance that the massive house building program going on around here (Preston) may have something to do with it.
17,000 new homes and no extra capacity in infrastructure. It really does begger belief that no one thought this would not create issues.
 
#74
Here in Algarve the construction of more and more golf courses is de rigeur - at the last count there were nearly forty. Each takes at least 100,000 litres of water per day from the common water table by the easiest (and cheapest) expedient of sinking a super-borehole of 300 metres or so and sucking up everything for miles around, so if your own domestic borehole nearby is only 70 metres deep then you're stuffed. Bearing in mind that a single round of golf costs upwards of 140/150 Euros per head and the courses are fully booked, I believe the solution is to make it mandatory that course operators install a desalination plant and that future planning consents are not granted unless one is included. Almost all of these courses are no more than a few kilometres from the coast (in fact, many are classified as links courses) and there was an abundance of water in the Atlantic the last time I looked.

For the record, my remote property has no mains water, relying instead on a borehole and 5,000 litres of rainwater tanks.

OZ
Agreed, corporates that own golf courses possible also can avoid paying their fair share of taxes too, however you could offset that with the tourism they bring in?

Water should be a national commodity though owned by the state and within reason taxed according to prevent the boreholes you mention ruining it for the self sufficient types off grid exactly how you mention.
 
#75
I do find it weird that it is us in the NW (with a HUGE amount of reservoirs) being hit with this first, and apart from the supply issue caused by the UV filters I mentioned earlier, there is a fair chance that the massive house building program going on around here (Preston) may have something to do with it.
17,000 new homes and no extra capacity in infrastructure. It really does begger belief that no one thought this would not create issues.
I lived in Preston, when we built there, there was no grey water considerations, it doesn’t take much to make it a building permit requirement for new dwellings to install a slimline grey water tank but I suppose when it’s raining all the tanks are full and so are the reservoirs, it’s only a problem if the reservoirs aren’t filling to capacity when it rains because demand outstrips supply, but if you look at a 5 year cycle, and rainwater tanks can keep the reservoirs full in low rainfall rain seasons, then they should be full enough that even when the tanks run empty and there is 100% demand there is still enough reserve for say 6 months.

A bit like electricity and renewables but with a simpler existing technology (unlike batteries).
 
#76
Agree, that was my point, Adelaide was in almost 5 years of drought, every new house has to have water tanks which feed one toilet as standard and you can obviously use it for the garden.
/thread drift

Speaking of Adelaide, how's it anyways? My knowledge, familiarity of Aus is restricted to the east, mainly from Melbourne to Brissy stretch. Adelaide and Perth are next on my list. Meaning to go to Perth for a while since one of my friends lives there, keeps inviting me all the time. Maybe when I am there next time.

/end of thread drift
 
#77
I do find it weird that it is us in the NW (with a HUGE amount of reservoirs) being hit with this first, and apart from the supply issue caused by the UV filters I mentioned earlier, there is a fair chance that the massive house building program going on around here (Preston) may have something to do with it.
17,000 new homes and no extra capacity in infrastructure. It really does begger belief that no one thought this would not create issues.
I remember watching countryfile earlier this year, they were interviewing one of those legal vultures who basically make a living running rings around local councils and forcing them to grant planning permission to build houses, all in accordance with government policy natch. He had the front to declare that he was helping to sell dreams and future memories in the form of homes, it’s funny how the developers are keen to tear up the green belt where they can name toy town estates “moorland view” or some such tosh and charge an extra 30 grand per house rather than build on brown field.
Local infrastructure considerations stand no chance against developers profits.
 
#78
I remember watching countryfile earlier this year, they were interviewing one of those legal vultures who basically make a living running rings around local councils and forcing them to grant planning permission to build houses, all in accordance with government policy natch. He had the front to declare that he was helping to sell dreams and future memories in the form of homes, it’s funny how the developers are keen to tear up the green belt where they can name toy town estates “moorland view” or some such tosh and charge an extra 30 grand per house rather than build on brown field.
Local infrastructure considerations stand no chance against developers profits.
Yep.
And when they 'brown envelope' it so that homes can be built on flood plains...
Happens a lot in Safferland.
Unfortunately, those 20-30 year occurrences when the rivers go batshit, and your house is now 6" under water...
 
#79
I do note that the reservoirs the beeb have listed are those feeding Manchester/Greater Manchester.
Given the amount of building that has gone on there over the past decade I'm wondering whether the lack of planning as regards water requirements has been foolishly left ignored.
Naturally , you don't expect people to PLAN for unforeseen events , do you ?
You'll be expecting them to grit the roads in winter , next .
 
#80
Reservoirs cost money to build. A shed load of money that might otherwise be used to make rich people even more obscenely rich.
And you have to contend with pressure groups objecting to badger/rare moth / rare plant / nightingale / great crested tortoiseshell / etc loss of habitat if you flood a remote valley in Wales
 

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