Was the Comet tank the best Medium tank of WW2?

Following this thread and reading up about the Comet, I found that one is preserved at the Russia tank museum at Kubinka. In Steven Zaloga's Osprey book about Lend-Lease tanks supplied to the USSR it is stated that 'At least one Comet tank was delivered later.' The 'later' in this context means after the USSR had tested the Cromwell (from autumn 1944) and decided not to ask for supplies thereof.
Going off topic a bit, there is info here about Soviet trials of the Cromwell, at Kubinka, in September 1944.
Tank Archives: Cromwell: English Dictator in Soviet Fields
 
Well there was a HE Round for it. According to my docs there's about 600ml* of space inside it when fired at 1800fps.

*Why is the space given in millilitres? Well the doc I have is from 1955 when the British were worrying about the large number of 17Lbr's in service and how they'd do against the Commie tank horde.
Step forward the brightest of Britain's scientists to come up with a solution, chemical anti-tank rounds. No not HEAT, or even HESH, but Chemical. the scientists were from Porton Down. They worked on the principle if we take normal service HE, fill it with thickened GD and smash it into an enemy tank, who cares about armour?
Just to stay on the thread, they used a Comet for the tests, and I've got a series of photographs of the Comet getting drenched by the impacts.
Sorry for a possibly bone question but what is thickened GD
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Great video, I enjoyed the tank restoration series, notice that Bob Darwood from this film has moved across to the Bovy Matilda Diaries, and is heavily involved in getting the Tank Museums Matilda back in milk.
Shirley more logical?
 
Shirley more logical?
Dairy - where miĺk comes from.
Diary - a written log or planner.

Hand in your Grammar Gestapo warrant card and double away to the Guardroom! :-D
 
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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Dairy - where miĺk comes from.
Diary - a written log or planner.

Hand in your Grammar Gestapo warrant card and double away to the Guardroom! :-D
Fuxake. Must be the heat.

Warrant card handed in, but bollix if I'm doubling anywhere.
 
One error in the documentary is where he says the Comet's gun fired the same round as the 17pdr.
It fired the same projectile but the case was smaller (from the 3" AA gun) & thus the velocity & penetrative qualities somewhat less.

Yes, the 3in cartridge case was used as the base for the 77mm round. There was a limited supply available so they were collected after firing for reloading. I'd need a bigger press for that job.
 
One error in the documentary is where he says the Comet's gun fired the same round as the 17pdr.
It fired the same projectile but the case was smaller (from the 3" AA gun) & thus the velocity & penetrative qualities somewhat less.

Yes, the 3in cartridge case was used as the base for the 77mm round. There was a limited supply available so they were collected after firing for reloading. I'd need a bigger press for that job.
Lyman still does the dies iirc :p
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
that Valentine must have been awfully cramped with a 75mm if it was originally designed for a 2 pdr. No wonder a Comet felt positively roomy!
I got the impression upthread that the model of 75 in question was actually a 6pdr bored out to 75mm. Certainly that's the 75 used on Churchills according to the Haynes manual (every day a training day eh? I thought so). Jump from 2pdr breech to 6pdr in turret doesn't sound as extreme to me.
 
I got the impression upthread that the model of 75 in question was actually a 6pdr bored out to 75mm. Certainly that's the 75 used on Churchills according to the Haynes manual (every day a training day eh? I thought so). Jump from 2pdr breech to 6pdr in turret doesn't sound as extreme to me.
They also reduced the crew by one.
 
Id imagine the difference between loading a 2pdr round, the size of a milk bottle, with one hand, was a piece of piss compared to a two-foot long 75 round, in that tiny turret, not to mind the greater recoil...
 
I suppose your probably right.

The reason I asked is, I'm on the World Of Tanks historical section forum and they're ranting and raving about the T-34 and the Sherman as usual.

I've no doubt that the Sherman was a behemoth of industrial engineering but there're no way was any of it's variants or the T-34-85 in the same league as the A34 Comet.
What is criteria for best tank though?

For overall impact on the war it would have to be the Sherman and the T34. Individually they were not the best by far but they were easy and cheap to build so huge numbers were put into operation.
 
What is criteria for best tank though?

For overall impact on the war it would have to be the Sherman and the T34. Individually they were not the best by far but they were easy and cheap to build so huge numbers were put into operation.
Armour, Firepower, Mobility, Reliability. After seeing the documentary though I wouldn't fancy getting hit in a Comet and trying to get out as the driver.
 

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