Was Serving In The Military Your Life and if so Why?

27 years in the RN. Been out three yers now (that's gone quickly). Yes It still is my "my life" in a way - if only for the reason that I've done longer inside than outside (few years more until this isn't the case). One itch that won't go away is the need to right it all down, kind of put it all away for once. So this year have finally started putting pen to paper - not with the intention of it being read by anyone, just to get 27 years of shit dits out my system.

Be careful, I did less years than you, but felt the same, writing it down is one thing, don't fall into the trap of boring the hat off people by becoming an "Uncle Albert" its easily done, I was reigned in by family, before it got too bloody tedious. keep the photos, bits of kit, and souvenirs for the grand kids. I have both my fathers and grandfathers from WW1 & WW2. These threads are a good place for Memory jogs, where applicable.
 
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Boxy

GCM
As said above, Full Time Reserve Service, jobs are advertised on the RAOL

Saves be having to get a ‘proper job’ and working for a living :)
Oi! don’t blow it for us!
“Money for old rope”
 

jg505

Old-Salt
Hmmm, I did 27 yrs in the RAF, so not sure if that counts for Military service. ;-)

If it does, I joined mid 80s, served all over the world, best tour was on 72 Sqn, NI, where I actually felt I was making a difference.

Reasonable promotion, left on my terms, nice pension, plus small war pension (many thanks to RAFA for all their help at my tribunal).

Met some incredibly brilliant people from all 3 services (incl RM).

Met some complete fcukwits, incl Acting Camp Bastion GSM who I told to stop swearing at me (before I'd talk to him). He'd clearly never come up against a 6' 4", 16 stone crusty RAF FS. Once he'd stopped swearing at me, he was actually quite nice, god bless him. (Although I honestly thought he'd had a small stroke when I told him to shush).

Got fcuked over at times, but c'est la vie.

Am I happy I left? Most definitely.

Was I proud to serve? Most definitely.

Would I do it again? Most definitely.

Do I miss it? Incredibly, for RAF, I miss the operational tours, but that's about it.
 

jg505

Old-Salt
Be careful, I did less years than you, but felt the same, writing it down is one thing, don't fall into the trap of boring the hat off people by becoming a "Uncle Albert" its easily done, I was reigned in by family, before it got too bloody tedious. keep the photos, bits of kit, and souvenirs for the grand kids. I have both my fathers and grandfathers from WW1 & WW2. These threads are a good place for Memory jogs, where applicable.
Well said Sir. I keep my reminiscing to getting drunk with guys I served with.
 
I had 22 years of sapper to WO2. A lot of it was shit. But the good times made up for it. Best times were in 2 AES as a tank driver - Cent bridge layer - then tank commander as as lance jack. After that 73 to 90 in EOD the last couple of years were crap as RE1 at DEODS but hey ho that’s life.
 

RE-DSO

Old-Salt
I had 22 years of sapper to WO2. A lot of it was shit. But the good times made up for it. Best times were in 2 AES as a tank driver - Cent bridge layer - then tank commander as as lance jack. After that 73 to 90 in EOD the last couple of years were crap as RE1 at DEODS but hey ho that’s life.

So you were 1 of the aloof WO's from DEODS?? LOL I was at CTSW/NSC/DEMSS/PNSC or whatever name it went by, changed almost monthly or what it felt like.
 
Best postings for me were 33 EOD at lodge hill and AAC Chepstow
 
Sandy was a brilliant instructor, and what he had forgotten about EOD probably wasn't worth knowing, the world iz a poorer place with his passing.
 
Sandy was a good mate of mine. He took over from me as RE1 at DEODS. We went back a long way. First time I met him he was a Sgt and I was a Ssgt. Sandy had located a crashed German bomber with a full bomb load at York airport and had asked for assistance. Sweetie papers was BDO and I was his No2 so we attended. We ended up carting a load of 50kg out of a hole in the ground that day. Come evening time, the police took me and SP to an hotel in York. SP didn't like the look of it - too posh he reckoned - so he sent me in to ask the price of a room. I walked in and spoke to the front of house manager, asked him the price. Unknown to me SP had followed me in and was standing behind me. The price was way above our subby level and when the front of house manager told me how much, a voice in broad Geordie said from behind me, "How much? I'd want waall to waall c unt for that price, cum on staff, f uck staying here".

The piano stopped playing, tumbleweed rolled across the foyer as we left the hotel.
 
So you were 1 of the aloof WO's from DEODS?? LOL I was at CTSW/NSC/DEMSS/PNSC or whatever name it went by, changed almost monthly or what it felt like.
I might have been a c unt as a WO2 but I was never aloof! :cool:
 
That is how a lot of autobiographical books start, I think: a brain dump!

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
It is cheaper than going to a shrink and him saying, "so, tell me about yourself". It clears the brain and allows you to reconsider past events, a bit like recounting your past and telling dits on here.
 
It was always that way, Recruiting Sgts have a long history, my comment was recruiting off ARRSE.
Not off ARRSE , at people's resettlement process .
If the Army has it's ducks in a row , these people will have already been earmarked for the interview .
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
I was radicalized from an early age.

My first experience of the army, apart from black and white TV, was late 1950's or early 60's.
I must have been small because the Saladin trundling down our high street seemed fecking huge.

Got to blame the Beatles next for the Centurion and Salisbury Plain scenes in "Help" at the cinema.

Early teens, I remember sitting in my back garden pondering my future and looking at the bloke's Honda 50 next door. He was probably a very experienced metal worker at Vickers Armstrong but you could set your Timex watch by his daily commute.
I decided then I didn't want to work where I couldn't see the sky.

His son joined the navy and was hardly ever seen again, I didn't fancy being on a boat staring at the water or being bounced around on it either.

As I got older I realised I was never going to fly a Phantom or Jaguar and the TSR2 had been cancelled. That was the RAF off my short list.

Later, on a day out with my Dad, we accidentally found Bovington.
There was all sorts of armour being driven around the training area and I couldn't believe they would pay you to do that.

Finally 1971. On a rainy day, I went along to a KAPE tour at our fire station and had a good chat with a Stalwart driver that was only a couple of years older than me.

Joined up the day after my 17th birthday. It only seemed like a couple of weeks between walking into the recruiting office and stepping off the train at Darlington for my basic at Catterick. Other recruits couldn't believe I had signed up for 22.

Arrived Germany Jan '72 and a couple of weeks later I was in Mosbach? skiing.

What I liked about the army was the constant variety of what you did and the amount of time, money and effort they invested in you to get you trained up.

No matter where you were, what you were doing or knew, there was always something else going on under the surface for you to discover.

Always enjoyed my operational tours (NI). I was never into the ceremony side of things.

Last two years, I was an instructor and got sent to the Army School of Education to be taught the army way to teach. Met a guy from the RE, same age and service. He had been all around the world and had every building trade you could think of.
I had only been to Germany, England and Ireland and could do just about anything with a Chieftain or 438. Still prefered my life.

1982 I PVR'd because I got married and joined the police.
My army creeping about skills set me up for a lifetime of surveillance and intelligence gathering against organised crime.
When computers became widespread the police stopped collating intel. Their systems were haystacks full of needles.
If you remembered from your army days collection, assessment, collation, assessment you did well.

Spent a year commuting from the Isle of Wight and got permission to park my van in Portsmouth dockyard.
Got the catamaran from Ryde most days, walked into the docks before driving passed the Victory and navy ships of all sizes before driving all over the country.

Maybe the RN was not such a bad choice.

edit..
The brain dump.
When you finish everything and have time to look back you realise how much stuff is in your head.
 

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