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War Pension Info & Questions

Forces Pension Society

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If the individual is invalided for an attrib condition and the Principle Invaliding Condition is assessed at 20% disability or above by WpS , my understanding is that the pension is tax free. These days it is likely to be an AFCS award and if that is linked to a medical discharge and the AFCS awards a Guaranteed Income Payment for the Principle Invaliding Condition, the pension becomes tax free.
 

Tiffy_Massive

Old-Salt
The war pension is tax free but I have spoken to someone in receipt of a war pension who told me their normal military pension is also tax free as they are on a 30% invaliding pension. Hence the question.
 
I was on 30% disability I contacted the nice kind tax man who worked their magic and made my normal pension tax free. It lasted six months until one day I had a nice letter saying that it was a mistake and could I kindly repay the back tax on my 24 year pension. Trying to argue the point that they cocked up went way above their heads so pay it back I did.
 

OldTimer

War Hero
You should not have had to pay it back , I think it is called Section 19 , if the tax people do not apply taxes correctly or fail to take notive of something they should have been aware of then you do not need to pay , I had this problem some years ago when they wanted nearly £6000 from me as they had not chased up tax from the MOD . They gave me the option of paying it or having it deducted from my pensions plus interest , Conacted my MP who sorted it out , The tax people tried it again the next year for a slightly smaller amount , again contated the MP . End result I| didnt have to pay it, Took a bit of work but much better in my pocket than the tax people
 
No but the treatment I.e. Upper tibial osteotomy followed by a Full knee replacement years later were carried out while still serving.
Thanks. In that case (and I am not an expert but have a lot of personal experience and research) I doubt your service pension will be made tax free, as it is a ‘normal’ pension, rather than a Service Attributable Pension or Service Invaliding Pension.

I believe there is a mechanism to argue for a retrospective medical discharge, thereby changing the pension status, but believe this is a very unlikely outcome. In other words, your WDP will be paid tax free (as always) but your service pension will be taxed.
I hope your knee is doing okay.
 

bluenosewrx

Old-Salt
Quick question to the experts, I lost most of my little finger in a accident in 2001, i am still serving at moment, will i be able to claim anything under the war pension scheme when i leave, i have heard yes and no but would like any feedback on here.
 

Forces Pension Society

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If the injury or condition is attributable and has its origins before 6 April 2005, it is the War Pension Scheme that could cover it - and that scheme does not allow in-service claims so you need to claim on discharge. AFCS covers attributable injuries or conditions arising on or after 6 April 2005.
 

bluenosewrx

Old-Salt
If the injury or condition is attributable and has its origins before 6 April 2005, it is the War Pension Scheme that could cover it - and that scheme does not allow in-service claims so you need to claim on discharge. AFCS covers attributable injuries or conditions arising on or after 6 April 2005.
Thank you, looks like its a yes then, every little helps for when i leave.
 

Mosquito

Swinger
I have a rather technical question regarding SAP/ACP rates.

Background
I was injured in 2003 on duty (i.e. attributable) and was medically discharged as a captain in 2006. Awarded 80% War Disablement Pension, Service Attributable Pension, WPMS and Clothing Allowance under AFPS 75.

I appealed my 80% disablement figure in 2017, which was heard in summer 2020 and my disablement increased to 100%. After my appeal case, Veterans UK (Norcross) updated my WDP and issued arrears back to 2017. A really impressive service as they made all the changes within two weeks of the decision.

Veterans UK (Glasgow), in contrast, took twelve weeks to increase my SAP, which they have just done. I was confused by them referring to my "SAP" as an "Annual Compensation Payment" and I'm very grateful to this thread for explaining the name change.

My current thought process
I had expected the SAP increase to work like with the WDP (i.e. 100% is 1.25 higher than 80%). But that appears to be far from the case.

- My 80% SAP in 2020 was £24,376.73.
- My 100% SAP in 2020 is £26,201.38.
- I'm very grateful for the £1824.65 increase; however, as a proportion of the 80% rate, that's an increase of only 7.5%, rather than the 25% increase I had expected.

I have gone through the SAP payment rates (for “OF2 and below") for 2006 (my year of discharge), 2007, 2019 and 2020. If one takes the 20% financial amount and divide it by 20, one can suggest the £ per % point. Using that relationship, one can calculate what the higher % tiers are actually worth. The figures are relatively constant over the years. For 2020, this leads to 30% not being worth 30% but only 23%. 40% = 28%, 50% = 34%, 60% = 38%, 70% = 42%, 80% = 51%, 90% = 55%, 100% = 59%. I’ve attached an image of my spreadsheet.

My questions
1. Why do War Disablement Pension rates increase directly in line with the percentage disablement?

2. Why does a SAP not do so? I.e. if a 2020 SAP at OF2 is worth £8371, then why isn't a 100% SAP worth five times more, i.e. £41,855?

3. To learn more about the AFAB scheme, is the best document for me to study the Army Pensions (Armed Forces Pension Scheme 1975 and Attributable Benefits Scheme) Warrant 2010?

4. Do the updated warrants since 2010 include any significant changes to the AFAB?

5. Why hasn’t the government made the warrants available via the www.legislation.gov.uk website?

6. Does the MOD provide a full explanation of how it calculates each year’s SAP rates and, if so, what is that process called and where can I find the details?

7. Is it usual practise for “annual compensation payments”, whether military related or not, to get proportionately less valuable as the severity of injury increases?

<edit, 13-12-2020> 8. I thought that Glasgow had stated that my 2020 100% SAP is worth £26,201.38 but I've realised that their letter was stating the figure for 2017, the year the changed was introduced; something that I think Glasgow could make clearer in its correspondence</edit>

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
 

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Last edited:
I have a rather technical question regarding SAP/ACP rates.

Background
I was injured in 2003 on duty (i.e. attributable) and was medically discharged as a captain in 2006. Awarded 80% War Disablement Pension, Service Attributable Pension, WPMS and Clothing Allowance under AFPS 75.

I appealed my 80% disablement figure in 2017, which was heard in summer 2020 and my disablement increased to 100%. After my appeal case, Veterans UK (Norcross) updated my WDP and issued arrears back to 2017. A really impressive service as they made all the changes within two weeks of the decision.

Veterans UK (Glasgow), in contrast, took twelve weeks to increase my SAP, which they have just done. I was confused by them referring to my "SAP" as an "Annual Compensation Payment" and I'm very grateful to this thread for explaining the name change.

My current thought process
I had expected the SAP increase to work like with the WDP (i.e. 100% is 1.25 higher than 80%). But that appears to be far from the case.

- My 80% SAP in 2020 was £24,376.73.
- My 100% SAP in 2020 is £26,201.38.
- I'm very grateful for the £1824.65 increase; however, as a proportion of the 80% rate, that's an increase of only 7.5%, rather than the 25% increase I had expected.

I have gone through the SAP payment rates (for “OF2 and below") for 2006 (my year of discharge), 2007, 2019 and 2020. If one takes the 20% financial amount and divide it by 20, one can suggest the £ per % point. Using that relationship, one can calculate what the higher % tiers are actually worth. The figures are relatively constant over the years. For 2020, this leads to 30% not being worth 30% but only 23%. 40% = 28%, 50% = 34%, 60% = 38%, 70% = 42%, 80% = 51%, 90% = 55%, 100% = 59%. I’ve attached an image of my spreadsheet.

My questions
1. Why do War Disablement Pension rates increase directly in line with the percentage disablement?

2. Why does a SAP not do so? I.e. if a 2020 SAP at OF2 is worth £8371, then why isn't a 100% SAP worth five times more, i.e. £41,855?

3. To learn more about the AFAB scheme, is the best document for me to study the Army Pensions (Armed Forces Pension Scheme 1975 and Attributable Benefits Scheme) Warrant 2010?

4. Do the updated warrants since 2010 include any significant changes to the AFAB?

5. Why hasn’t the government made the warrants available via the www.legislation.gov.uk website?

6. Does the MOD provide a full explanation of how it calculates each year’s SAP rates and, if so, what is that process called and where can I find the details?

7. Is it usual practise for “annual compensation payments”, whether military related or not, to get proportionately less valuable as the severity of injury increases?

<edit, 29-11-2020> 8. How did Glasgow decide my 100% SAP is worth £26,201.38? </edit>

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
@Forces Pension Society ?
 

Forces Pension Society

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The War Pension Scheme (WPS) is separate to the AFPS Service Attributable Pension (SAP). An adjustment of one does not necessarily mean an adjustment of the other. AFPS SAP could change if the original assessment of the condition is wrong. The WPS assessment responds to deterioration etc. If you are in any doubt, you need to contact Veterans UK.
 

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