War Memorials

LARD

GCM
Don’t know where, but there’s a village around who didn’t put a Regt or Branch on their memorial, they chose to just remember the people of the village.
The one in our village is like that. Although most will have been 10th of Foot no doubt.
 
Don’t know where, but there’s a village around who didn’t put a Regt or Branch on their memorial, they chose to just remember the people of the village.

West Auckland in County Durham has a new war memorial (2009) with 71 WWI, 38 WWII and 1 Northern Ireland names. No rank, unit or decorations, just first name, initial if applicable and surname.

I'm not sure how one qualified to be on the memorial. My great aunt is on there, an ATS Serjeant and an Army running champion, but she died in 1947 from influenza and is buried in the local cemetery.

The memorial is in front of a water fountain that was opened for Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897.

There is a memorial hall built in 1925 via public subscription on Darlington Road but I don't know if there was a memorial plaque in the building, or how the names were listed.

(Apologies, I've tried to post a picture of the new memorial from online but it doesn't want to upload.)
 
West Auckland in County Durham has a new war memorial (2009) with 71 WWI, 38 WWII and 1 Northern Ireland names. No rank, unit or decorations, just first name, initial if applicable and surname.

I'm not sure how one qualified to be on the memorial. My great aunt is on there, an ATS Serjeant and an Army running champion, but she died in 1947 from influenza and is buried in the local cemetery.

The memorial is in front of a water fountain that was opened for Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897.

There is a memorial hall built in 1925 via public subscription on Darlington Road but I don't know if there was a memorial plaque in the building, or how the names were listed.

(Apologies, I've tried to post a picture of the new memorial from online but it doesn't want to upload.)
Fulstow war memorial dedicated 13 November 2005


 
Fulstow war memorial dedicated 13 November 2005


I wonder who told them that they couldn't have the name of an executed deserter on their memorial? There's plenty of memorials from the time with the names of executed deserters on them. Haigh even unveiled one in Lancashire (I think, it is referenced in Blindfold and Alone by Corns and Hughes) that contained the names of two men that were executed for desertion.
 
I wonder who told them that they couldn't have the name of an executed deserter on their memorial? There's plenty of memorials from the time with the names of executed deserters on them. Haigh even unveiled one in Lancashire (I think, it is referenced in Blindfold and Alone by Corns and Hughes) that contained the names of two men that were executed for desertion.

Charles H Kirman's name does appear on the Immingham War Memorial.
 
I wonder who told them that they couldn't have the name of an executed deserter on their memorial? There's plenty of memorials from the time with the names of executed deserters on them. Haigh even unveiled one in Lancashire (I think, it is referenced in Blindfold and Alone by Corns and Hughes) that contained the names of two men that were executed for desertion.
I initially believed this story when it surfaced, about 10 years or so ago when the 'missing names' movement became fashionable. I now believe it is a myth manufactured by a 'missing names' hunter.
I've found many of these 'historians' to be quite creative in their reasoning why names are missing some of which defy simple logic. For example, "There was a list made in the local library but someone tore the bottom part of it off"
There are a few villages surrounding the country town where I live that have no War Memorials, not because no one died but it was more reasonable to have the names on our town memorial (which is similar what happened in the case of Charles H Kirman as pointed out in an above post. I dare say if one of those villagers had been executed, it would have been possible to weave a similar story about their absence for a non-existing village war memorial.
But, no doubt it was convenient to ignore Charles Kirman's presence on the Immingham War Memorial for the sake of a good 'look what I've found' story.
 
Walking along the Thames today, on a path I used run along, and saw for the first time this memorial at Hays Wharf (Now Hays Galleria), next to the Horniman Pub:
20220115_132207.jpg
 
I initially believed this story when it surfaced, about 10 years or so ago when the 'missing names' movement became fashionable. I now believe it is a myth manufactured by a 'missing names' hunter.
I've found many of these 'historians' to be quite creative in their reasoning why names are missing some of which defy simple logic. For example, "There was a list made in the local library but someone tore the bottom part of it off"
There are a few villages surrounding the country town where I live that have no War Memorials, not because no one died but it was more reasonable to have the names on our town memorial (which is similar what happened in the case of Charles H Kirman as pointed out in an above post. I dare say if one of those villagers had been executed, it would have been possible to weave a similar story about their absence for a non-existing village war memorial.
But, no doubt it was convenient to ignore Charles Kirman's presence on the Immingham War Memorial for the sake of a good 'look what I've found' story.
In the case of Fulstow the local town is Louth.. None of the Fulstow names are on the Louth memorial or any other local memorial. So why no memorial.? 10 men died so I think people would have cared .
Was cost an issue as most memorials were raised by suscription and local fund raising?
Locally we have one memorial at Strubby which is hand drawn on paper, the Yarburgh memorial consists of a wooden plaque. So I don't believe cost was an issue.

Prior to WW2 money was collected to erect a village hall, post war this was erected as a memorial to WW2 casualties of which there were 5. Why not to the WW1 casualties as well? Clearly something unusual is happening here. In 1956 when the original hall was erected their would have still been many who served or had a direct link to WW1.

I believe the Kirman story is credible, but with all surviving witnesses long gone proof other than local aural history is in short supply.
 
Last edited:
Top