War Memorials

joey88

Old-Salt
The cenotaph in Cardiff and the Falklands war memorial after this mornings remembrance service.
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We saw a si

We saw a sign on the 'main' Road and followed it. Sadly we only had half an hour as we had another social engagement to attend and they are shut on weekdays from this week. We would recommend it and fully intend returning with more time. It was excellent and the guides we spoke to so enthusiastic.
When you return to Suffolk/Norfolk, if you get the chance go to Bury St Edmunds and about three miles east you come to Rougham Airfield. The have a very good Control Tower Museum and there is a nice Cafe on site with even more artefacts inside.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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When you return to Suffolk/Norfolk, if you get the chance go to Bury St Edmunds and about three miles east you come to Rougham Airfield. The have a very good Control Tower Museum and there is a nice Cafe on site with even more artefacts inside.
I'm certainly going back that way. Cousins will need more visits...
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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There’s a few good museums in East Anglia. Not far from the 100th Bomb Group museum just outside Long Stratton is the Norfolk Tank Museum, all BOAR equipment.
Ooh, himself will need a day there for misty-eyed remembering...
 

ancienturion

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Ooh, himself will need a day there for misty-eyed remembering...

Forget it!
I once did the Ribble viaduct thing and stopped in Carlisle to have a look at the Castle.
There was a museum there with a display of the stuff I had been initially issued with.
What was worse was the fact that the only fault I could find was webbing assembled incorrectly.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

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Forget it!
I once did the Ribble viaduct thing and stopped in Carlisle to have a look at the Castle.
There was a museum there with a display of the stuff I had been initially issued with.
What was worse was the fact that the only fault I could find was webbing assembled incorrectly.
Show parade in the foyer 1800.
 
I’m spending the weekend in Knaresborough and am most impressed by the war memorial here. It is splendidly located in the castle grounds overlooking the river, and it is beautifully maintained. Someone has clearly been applying a bit of brasso and some elbow grease!
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Joshua Slocum

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The terrible thing, was that SOE already had a team in the harbour, the explosives, and workers that were going to plant them, the ballyhoo over this raid caused many of them to be caught when houses were searched
they were intending to install explosive devices deep within the ships to sink them at sea
But M16 and M15 hated SOE , and always tried to scupper their plans, they had a chap working for SOE who passed everything on to MI5 and to the Germans as well
 

LARD

GCM
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Was taken by our village war memorial. Looks almost like the Christmas tree has got it's arm round it.
 
I‘VE been up in Kirk Yetholm, Scottish Borders, watching athletes finish the Montane Spine Race. There are two memorials here. One commemorates the residents of Yetholm who were killed or missing in the First World War (23 names) and the Second World War (3 names).

The other commemorates Major General Andrew Gilbert Wauchope CB CMG LLD, who gave his life on 11 December 1899 at Magersfontein in the South-African War (2nd Boer War).
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They`re a little on the large side. These might be better.

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There doesn't seem to have been a standard way of listing war dead on community memorials. Some give rank and regiment. others will distinguish by officer and Service but most seem to do it (perhaps most appropriately) by alphabetical order. Some give post nominals, but most don't.

Walking in the Thames Valley pre-lockdown I came across a small memorial in a village, and was a bit perturbed that regiments were not given amongst the many war dead (with obvious family name clusters) until I realised they were ALL from the same regiment, and I suspect, the same battle. Very moving.

I have also seen some memorials where all those who served are listed, and then a cross alongside the names of those who died.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
There doesn't seem to have been a standard way of listing war dead on community memorials. Some give rank and regiment. others will distinguish by officer and Service but most seem to do it (perhaps most appropriately) by alphabetical order. Some give post nominals, but most don't.

Walking in the Thames Valley pre-lockdown I came across a small memorial in a village, and was a bit perturbed that regiments were not given amongst the many war dead (with obvious family name clusters) until I realised they were ALL from the same regiment, and I suspect, the same battle. Very moving.

I have also seen some memorials where all those who served are listed, and then a cross alongside the names of those who died.

The memorial at Hambleden (in Bucks) is similar to that but some of the names inscribed are becoming rather weather worn now. However, in the church is a Roll of Honour which is turned to a new page each day.
As an aside, there used to be a rather nice pub in the village, called the Stag, with a local butcher shop next door.
 
Don’t know where, but there’s a village around who didn’t put a Regt or Branch on their memorial, they chose to just remember the people of the village.




Ours is like that. Just last name and initial. Designed by Harold Barkspear, it was erected in 1920 and is Grade II Listed. The memorial is a simple base and shaft with a carving in the top. The village raised funds and we refurbished it in 2014. I got "volunteered" to arrange refurbishment. The base was sinking and at an angle, there was damaged and cracked stone, the stone and the names were worn so working with the conservation officer we took the memorial down and rebuilt it on a new concrete base.we "sharpened" the names, replaced damaged stone and tidied up the memorial generally. The tabernacle at the top (the posh carving) is thought to have come from a medieval preaching cross.

The memorial is rural, rustic and simple as befits a small village based on agriculture. For what was a small village it was quite a toll
The names are:
1914-1918- J Barrington; W Cole; S Cousens; J Heath; L Humphries; J Lea; A Lewis; H Parsons; J Pollard; F Rose; A Russ; A Smith;
1939-1945: E Cove; J Heath


Edited to add: knowing our village, carving was often charged by the letter so rank and regiment would have cost more. Simple farming folk are not that simple, initial and last name would have been more...economic!

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