War Memorials

A slightly different one from abroad, a memorial garden directly on the coast of Jutland where the naval battle took place in 1916.
Probably where a lot of boys got washed up days and weeks later, up and down this coast.
Very different, but still respectful and tastefully designed.
Each large stone, and there are a lot, bears the name of a ship lost with lives taken away too.
Very sobering and a time for sombre reflection.

The small white statues alongside represent the number of lives lost from each ship, quite spooky and sobering really.

The second photo is of the stone representing HMS Black Prince which went down with all hands apparently.


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A slightly different one from abroad, a memorial garden directly on the coast of Jutland where the naval battle took place in 1916.
Probably where a lot of boys got washed up days and weeks later, up and down this coast.
Very different, but still respectful and tastefully designed.
Each large stone, and there are a lot, bears the name of a ship lost with lives taken away too.
Very sobering and a time for sombre reflection.

The small white statues alongside represent the number of lives lost from each ship, quite spooky and sobering really.

The second photo is of the stone representing HMS Black Prince which went down with all hands apparently.


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German losses are commemorated too
 
German losses are commemorated too
An important point. Indeed, the memorial was opened by Admiral Jellicoe's grandson, Nicolas Jellicoe, and by Vice Admiral Reinhard Scheer's great-grandson, Reinhard Scheer.
 
There is a small museum nearby where the battle ensign of Jellicoe senior is displayed, it is on loan from the family.
From his flagship of the time HMS Iron Duke.
Although Denmark was neutral then, it was a surprise to learn that over a thousand Danish sailors died due to mines laid by both sides, and how many CWGC sites there are in some very isolated places from WW1.
 
People here will know about this one but I just learned of it. Market Garden Memorial at Paulton in Somerset. On 17th September 1944 a Horsa Glider towed by an RAF Keevil Stirling came apart or exploded - nobody seems to be sure. The tail fell on the road and the front section fell in a field. The men in gliders were not issued with parachutes and I am unsure whether, at the time of the disaster, the Stirling/Horsa was flying high enough for them to have been deployed. There were no survivors.
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Enhanced Double Hills Memorial, Dec 2009.jpg
Paulton Double Hills Memorial.jpg
 
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Oosterbeek.
Arnhem J.jpg
Arnhem Defiance.jpg
Wallpaper preserved in Hartenstein Hotel Museum. Defiance Airborne style.
 
Oosterbeek. Last time I was there, the most memorable sight was the smallest meanest floral tribute from 3 Para. It looked like it had been bought in a Poundshop sale. It was insignificant compared to the other tributes from the great and the good. But those words reduced me to tears;

'From Brothers who visit in memory of Brothers who remain'.
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The Reason Why
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legobrick

Old-Salt
Nice memorial to the Polish forces and Wojtek the bear in Prince's Street Gardens, Edinburgh.
 

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F*ck the Gerry's ....what? Unnecessary apostrophe.

(signed)

Grammar Nazis
I think the author may have been under a bit of pressure at the time of writing
 
Yes, perhaps he was unable to finish the sentence.
Yes. When you are trying to defend a compromised perimeter and a Tiger tank rolls up and crushes your fox hole and all you have is a rifle
Baskeyfield3.jpg
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, life can be a bit of a bitch. Jack Baskeyfield knew how to tame a Tiger though.
 
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Jack's Tree.jpeg

Jack's Tree
 
Nice memorial to the Polish forces and Wojtek the bear in Prince's Street Gardens, Edinburgh.
Part of its inscription "For Your Freedom and Ours".
 
I stumbled across this BBC article this morning. Did a search for 'Horsmonden' on this thread and nothing came up so perhaps, like me, this is a new one for you.

If you can get past the initial few seconds of 'intro' you may find it quite unique and (when the segment covers 2 brothers) even a bit moving.

 
I stumbled across this BBC article this morning. Did a search for 'Horsmonden' on this thread and nothing came up so perhaps, like me, this is a new one for you.

If you can get past the initial few seconds of 'intro' you may find it quite unique and (when the segment covers 2 brothers) even a bit moving.

How moving that was. And what unimaginable grief that mother suffered when receiving that touching letter telling her that her sons had died together.
 
How moving that was. And what unimaginable grief that mother suffered when receiving that touching letter telling her that her sons had died together.
Without wishing to be morbid I was hoping that the report would state the rank/name of the (Platoon) Commander who wrote that letter?

Trying to imagine a young 2lt or Lt sat in front of a typewriter somewhere having to word such a letter.
 
Without wishing to be morbid I was hoping that the report would state the rank/name of the (Platoon) Commander who wrote that letter?

Trying to imagine a young 2lt or Lt sat in front of a typewriter somewhere having to word such a letter.
I remember reading - and being moved to tears - an account by one of the wartime poets, writing to the mother of a (very) close friend and fellow Subaltern who had been killed during an assault. He was trying to tell the grieving mother how heartbroken he was that his friend was killed, without revealing the awkward depth of their friendship.

ETA: I think many of these close relationships were filial and not sexual - like Charles Ryder and Sebastian Flyte in 'Brideshead Revisited'. BTW, recently watched the series from the early 1980s...excellent.
 
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