War Memorials

I'll approach the local vicar and get the lie of the land. The reason Herr Schulze headstone is in such a state, is because the Church and cemetery are right on the North sea coast.
Strange that, a German Regt having a depot in the UK.
Just remembered, I heard a rumour that's there might be a RHA Gentleman buried in a village around 10 miles away, who was also at Waterloo. Have to chase that one up as well.
Hi Robinrocket,

I have copies of both volumes of "Wellington's Men Remembered". Let me have the name of the village and I'll see if they have an entry for the RHA Gentleman.

Schultze does not appear, so The Waterloo Association may not have the details of this memorial. Although the books have been published, the database may still be open. You might want to contact the archivist.

djbromley1815@gmail.com

Likewise, if you were thinking of some restoration/preservation it might be worth contacting The Association as they have successfully helped in the past.
 
That's handy. I'll send him a quick message this evening.
As for the RHA Gent, it was a Legion member who told me about him. I'm in tomorrow as he and I are part of the committee for the AFD at Lowestoft next year.
 
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One inscription that makes the air dusty for me is on a number of New Zealand memorials, most notably at Çunuk Bair, at the top of the Gallipoli peninsula. Simple, accurate and very moving:

“FROM THE UTTERMOST ENDS OF THE EARTH”

I can’t help but think that many of the men, whether it was at Gallipoli, Palestine or the Western Front, must have had a “fûck me, how the Hell did I end up here?” moment.

But the diaries and letters that survive, even late into the war, were pretty optimistic and full of exciting things they got up to on leave. Of course, they would want to shield their loved ones from the horror, but for most Kiwis, every thing was new. My Grandfather chose to visit Catholic relatives on his mother’s side in Ireland over Easter in 1916. Firstly, they were shocked to find he wasn’t a Catholic* (he’d taken the Pledge and was a Methodist) and, secondly, his letters described the poverty that many of his cousins were enduring. My grandfather left school on Auckland at 12 and worked as a forester, driver and a blacksmith. He was not from a wealthy background and would have known hard times growing up. He was similarly shocked seeing the conditions in West and South Yorkshire that paternal relatives were living in, and described it in simple, elegant prose.

*in 1990 I met a very elderly Catholic relative in NYC who was a teenager in Ireland in 1916 and remembered “Bob” well. Her eyes lit up as she described his colouring as the same as mine (Sandy/hint of ginger), his piercing blue eyes and his robust build. (He died when my dad was 7 and he could only remember that Bob has very blue eyes and red hair). He would have been 25 or 26 and she noted that he was much taller than her brothers and other men of similar age. His enlistment papers have him at 5’9”, so no giant, and he was also on sick leave at the time. She said the family were shocked when they asked him to go to Mass and in a happy-go-lucky way, he responded with “no thanks, I’m a Methodist” but accepted it and stayed with them for about a week. I did wonder whether she had gone a bit girly about him at the time...
 
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Am I reading that right. The blokes buryed there don't have headstones?
I wondered about that as well. Not least because a CWGC headstone with multiple names must be very rare.

That was the only Portland stone CWGC style headstone in the cemetery. It was up against the church wall rather than in the burial area. I did have a good look around for others (on the basis that they should be easy to spot given most of the memorials are black granite or weathered sandstone) but could't find any. It was a big boneyard attached to a beautiful Edwardian Methodist church and there were a lot of graves (it was a big nonconformist area with all manner of churches, chapels etc) so searching for Sapper Binns was impractical.

It stood alone on a well manicured lawn so my guess is that it was carved as a sort of joint memorial to the dead who could be commemorated in one place.

They take their commemoration seriously here. The memorial in the town square has a poppy wreath on it with a WWI picture in the middle.
 
I wondered about that as well. Not least because a CWGC headstone with multiple names must be very rare.

That was the only Portland stone CWGC style headstone in the cemetery. It was up against the church wall rather than in the burial area. I did have a good look around for others (on the basis that they should be easy to spot given most of the memorials are black granite or weathered sandstone) but could't find any. It was a big boneyard attached to a beautiful Edwardian Methodist church and there were a lot of graves (it was a big nonconformist area with all manner of churches, chapels etc) so searching for Sapper Binns was impractical.

It stood alone on a well manicured lawn so my guess is that it was carved as a sort of joint memorial to the dead who could be commemorated in one place.

They take their commemoration seriously here. The memorial in the town square has a poppy wreath on it with a WWI picture in the middle.
You hear or even see that type over in France or Belgium in the WW1 dressing station cemeteries. I've never seen one in the UK. That's strange!
 
Aston Subedge, Cotswolds


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Hi Robinrocket,

I have copies of both volumes of "Wellington's Men Remembered". Let me have the name of the village and I'll see if they have an entry for the RHA Gentleman.

Schultze does not appear, so The Waterloo Association may not have the details of this memorial. Although the books have been published, the database may still be open. You might want to contact the archivist.

djbromley1815@gmail.com

Likewise, if you were thinking of some restoration/preservation it might be worth contacting The Association as they have successfully helped in the past.
Sent two messages today, one to that Bromley feller, and another to a bloke I found on their Web page. No response as of yet.
 
Sent two messages today, one to that Bromley feller, and another to a bloke I found on their Web page. No response as of yet.
The Association are great people, but it's quite a traditional organisation and they don't always go at Internet warp speed.

The 1st Hussars KGL was in Dornberg's 3rd Cavalry Brigade at Waterloo, along with the 2nd Hussars KGL and 23rd Light Dragoons.

The majority of KGL officers returned to Hannover after the war, many going on to serve in the new Hannoverian army. There could well be a romantic back story that kept Schultze here.
 
The Association are great people, but it's quite a traditional organisation and they don't always go at Internet warp speed.

The 1st Hussars KGL was in Dornberg's 3rd Cavalry Brigade at Waterloo, along with the 2nd Hussars KGL and 23rd Light Dragoons.

The majority of KGL officers returned to Hannover after the war, many going on to serve in the new Hannoverian army. There could well be a romantic back story that kept Schultze here.
It would be interesting to find out why he decided to settle in England, but we're not likely to ever find out. Not unless he's got some hidden diary somewhere!
As for the Association, just have to wait and see.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Taken this afternoon in the Cathedral at Bayeux. People here don't forget.


(They don't know how to use dusters either. So many cobwebs and a layer of dust on many of the wreaths from last November. )

Sorry the last one has the reflection of my hand. You should be pleased I noticed my first efforts showed all of me.
(Polishing staff more assiduous than dusting staff...)
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Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
@Grownup_Rafbrat , don't know if you've the time or have been, but on the Outskirts of Bayeux there's the Salvage Museum. Really interesting.
We would probably like that. Any clue as to location? It's not on the map we have


Tomorrow we'll be going t o the British Cemetery, then moving on. I would like t o look at the Salvage Museum on the way...
 
We would probably like that. Any clue as to location? It's not on the map we have


Tomorrow we'll be going t o the British Cemetery, then moving on. I would like t o look at the Salvage Museum on the way...
Here we go Lass,
Museum of Normandy Wrecks
Musee des Epaves,
Route de Bayeux B.P. 9
14520 Port-en-Bessin.

Hope that helps.
 
Update lass, I've just gone on Google earth. If you've got Google earth, find the Route de Bayeux D9
Carefully follow it south you'll find a large roundabout, keep following the D9 ie straight over. The museum is on your left @ half a click further on. Enjoy.
 
Chipping Campden War Memorial

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Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Whilst researching some family history in Dublin's Deans Grange cemetery I stumbled across this very unusual war memorial\graves setup to not only a British soldier, some 1916 civilian casualties but also to a couple of Irish Volunteers.
Very strange I think you will agree.
no 1.jpg
No 2.jpg


@oldbaldy @tiger stacker you may find the Scots Guard chap's grave interesting for research purposes.
 
Is the Guardsman 1918 or 1916, it would seem like a multiple grave going by the angle or ?
Some google info here:

Dublin – Deansgrange Cemetery

Guardsman Peter Ennis of the Scots Guards, who was at home on leave in Dublin when the Rising broke out. He was shot, some say accidentally, outside Sir Patrick Dun’s Hospital, by the Volunteers who had occupied Boland’s Mill.

Dublin People - Dead of both sides remembered at 1916 event in Deansgrange

Poor chap was on leave when it all kicked off in 1916, not uncommon by the way.
 
Hi Robinrocket,

I have copies of both volumes of "Wellington's Men Remembered". Let me have the name of the village and I'll see if they have an entry for the RHA Gentleman.

Schultze does not appear, so The Waterloo Association may not have the details of this memorial. Although the books have been published, the database may still be open. You might want to contact the archivist.

djbromley1815@gmail.com

Likewise, if you were thinking of some restoration/preservation it might be worth contacting The Association as they have successfully helped in the past.
I've been in contact with the Waterloo Association, there is to be a third book and Lt Schulze is to be included in it.
They also said, they have put things in motion to try and get his headstone restored. I think from an email I received from the Waterloo Ass that the KGL Association may also have been in touch.
 
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